Unpatriotic Kaepernick will opt-out of contract

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Unpatriotic Kaepernick will opt-out of contract

[cap­tion id=“attachment_94866” align=“alignright” width=“227”] Chicago’s South Side last autumn[/caption]

By John Ruberry

Posi­tion wanted: Start­ing quarterback.

A dis­mal National Foot­ball League sea­son will end tonight when between the Atlanta Fal­cons and the New Eng­land Patri­ots meet in the Super Bowl in Hous­ton, after of course our national anthem is performed.

Oh, Da Tech Guy him­self, a Patri­ots fan, may not agree of my “dis­mal” assess­ment. His team is in the Super Bowl, not mine, the Chicago Bears.

The Star Span­gled Ban­ner has been one of the major NFL sto­ries this sea­son, much to the cha­grin to league brass because San Fran­cisco 49ers quar­ter­back Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the anthem, which of course is per­formed before every game. A few mem­bers from roughly one-​third of the other NFL teams fol­lowed his unpa­tri­otic lead, along with some col­lege and high school ath­letes. Kaepernick’s beef with the anthem is that he believes Amer­ica stands for racial prej­u­dice and police bru­tal­ity, which are ideas you’ll find in the play­book of Black Lives Mat­ters rad­i­cals, not the 49ers. Kaeper­nick, who is black but was raised by white par­ents, is a mil­lion­aire. Although NFL rules pro­hibit him from mak­ing it offi­cial until next month, Kaeper­nick will be a free agent next month, an ESPN reporter reported Fri­day. The tim­ing is curi­ous – I sus­pect that two days before the Super Bowl was cho­sen because of hyp­ing of the game itself, and the reveal­ing of the new NFL Hall of Fame inductees on Sat­ur­day, would bury the Kaeper­nick self-​firing, as his anti-​anthem, and yes, anti-​America protests have been an embar­rass­ment to the league.

TV rat­ings were down eight per­cent for the 2016 sea­son, more so ear­lier on as the Kaeper­nick story was fes­ter­ing. While some lib­eral jour­nal­ists chose to ignore the Kaeper­nick fac­tor when report­ing the rat­ings decline, point­ing out that con­cerns over con­cus­sions, the lack of NFL star power, par­tic­u­larly in the first four weeks of the sea­son when Patri­ots’ quar­ter­back Tom Brady was under sus­pen­sion because of Deflate­gate, and view­ers being more inter­ested in the rau­cous pres­i­den­tial elec­tion were the real cause, an early Octo­ber poll by Ras­mussen found that nearly one-​third of Amer­i­cans said they’d be less likely to watch an NFL con­test because of the anthem protests.

Soon the bid­ding war will begin for Kaeper­nick. Or maybe not. While he did take the 49ers to the Super Bowl four years ago, he per­formed poorly dur­ing his last two sea­sons; in 2016 Kaeper­nick was 110 as starter. I only watched him play once on tele­vi­sion in ’16, on a snowy day against another rot­ten team, the Chicago Bears, Kaeper­nick com­pleted just one pass out of five attempts with four yards gained. He was sacked five times.

The 49ers signed Kaeper­nick to win foot­ball games – not to be a rad­i­cal. The other 31 NFL teams will be look­ing to sign a win­ner as quar­ter­back, not some­one who gets sacked more times than the yards he passed for. Oh, some team will sign him, only because of his Super Bowl pedi­gree. But can Kaeper­nick sur­vive train­ing camp ros­ter cuts?

NFL: Your long Colin Kaeper­nick night­mare may soon be over.

On a per­sonal note, I will be root­ing for the New Eng­land Patri­ots in the Super Bowl. I usu­ally line up behind the NFC cham­pion, but because Tom Brady is under attack by left­ists for not back­ing out of his friend­ship with Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump, I am part of the Patri­ots Nation today. Go Pats!

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

Chicago’s South Side last autumn

By John Ruberry

Position wanted: Starting quarterback.

A dismal National Football League season will end tonight when between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots meet in the Super Bowl in Houston, after of course our national anthem is performed.

Oh, Da Tech Guy himself, a Patriots fan, may not agree of my “dismal” assessment. His team is in the Super Bowl, not mine, the Chicago Bears.

The Star Spangled Banner has been one of the major NFL stories this season, much to the chagrin to league brass because San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the anthem, which of course is performed before every game. A few members from roughly one-third of the other NFL teams followed his unpatriotic lead, along with some college and high school athletes. Kaepernick’s beef with the anthem is that he believes America stands for racial prejudice and police brutality, which are ideas you’ll find in the playbook of Black Lives Matters radicals, not the 49ers. Kaepernick, who is black but was raised by white parents, is a millionaire. Although NFL rules prohibit him from making it official until next month, Kaepernick will be a free agent next month, an ESPN reporter reported Friday. The timing is curious–I suspect that two days before the Super Bowl was chosen because of hyping of the game itself, and the revealing of the new NFL Hall of Fame inductees on Saturday, would bury the Kaepernick self-firing, as his anti-anthem, and yes, anti-America protests have been an embarrassment to the league.

TV ratings were down eight percent for the 2016 season, more so earlier on as the Kaepernick story was festering. While some liberal journalists chose to ignore the Kaepernick factor when reporting the ratings decline, pointing out that concerns over concussions, the lack of NFL star power, particularly in the first four weeks of the season when Patriots’ quarterback Tom Brady was under suspension because of Deflategate, and viewers being more interested in the raucous presidential election were the real cause, an early October poll by Rasmussen found that nearly one-third of Americans said they’d be less likely to watch an NFL contest because of the anthem protests.

Soon the bidding war will begin for Kaepernick. Or maybe not. While he did take the 49ers to the Super Bowl four years ago, he performed poorly during his last two seasons; in 2016 Kaepernick was 1-10 as starter. I only watched him play once on television in ’16, on a snowy day against another rotten team, the Chicago Bears, Kaepernick completed just one pass out of five attempts with four yards gained. He was sacked five times.

The 49ers signed Kaepernick to win football games–not to be a radical.  The other 31 NFL teams will be looking to sign a winner as quarterback, not someone who gets sacked more times than the yards he passed for. Oh, some team will sign him, only because of his Super Bowl pedigree. But can Kaepernick survive training camp roster cuts?

NFL: Your long Colin Kaepernick nightmare may soon be over.

On a personal note, I will be rooting for the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl. I usually line up behind the NFC champion, but because Tom Brady is under attack by leftists for not backing out of his friendship with President Donald Trump, I am part of the Patriots Nation today. Go Pats!

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.