Norma, Olivia, Natashia and a Protest in Fitchburg

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Norma, Olivia, Natashia and a Protest in Fitchburg

At the last minute my sched­uled extra shift was can­celled and I found myself able to briefly attended the anti-​abortion protest in Fitch­burg which while part of a series of national protests for defend­ing planned par­ent­hood was delayed a week by win­ter storms.

In the seven years that Planned Par­ent­hood has been in Fitch­burg there have been many demon­stra­tions there and lots of prayer but over the last year our friends on the left started count­ing protest­ing so there were two dis­tinct groups, one near the entrance of the park­ing garage that was pro­life and want­ing to defund planned parenthood

And one directly oppo­site the “clinic” that was in favor of abor­tion and planned parenthood

When we first started protest­ing planned par­ent­hood before the build­ing even opened we had no oppo­si­tion (unless you count the painter work­ing on the build­ing before they opened who told me that said if it gets rid of some of the Span­ish in town he’s all for it) the other side never both­ered to counter protest. It speaks well of the effec­tive­ness of the pro-​life prayers that our foes now, in the last year have found it nec­es­sary to counter us (if we had no effect then they’d ignore us) and it speaks even bet­ter of us that in a col­lege town in this bluest of states we out­num­bered them on a Sat­ur­day, but the most inter­est­ing part of my brief visit was com­pletely unexpected.

At one point as the rosary began a young lady from the other side walked over and started engag­ing one of our group, the orga­nizer, not want­ing the prayers to be inter­rupted, asked her to post­pone her engage­ment until the prayer was done at which time they’d be happy to talk to her but I was intrigued, so I walked over to her and we spoke lit­er­ally between the two groups.

Other than age we had a lot in com­mon, we attended the same uni­ver­sity (although it was a col­lege when I was there before she was born) we were both engi­neers (although she has a dou­ble major) but most impor­tant of all she was will­ing to talk to peo­ple she dis­agreed with which sug­gests both curios­ity and a lik­ing for peo­ple, this and her civil­ity given what we’ve seen in the land is rare and should always be encouraged.

At this point I offered to inter­view her and she con­sented (which given my asso­ci­a­tion with the other side shows a level of trust I’ve rarely expe­ri­enced when engag­ing opponents)

I thought she did quite well, par­tic­u­larly on the ques­tion of fund­ing and after the inter­view we talked briefly. She said that I had given her things to think about.

Mean­while I moved back to my side of the aisle and there I found Olivia who also con­sented to an inter­view. She was a few years younger than Natasha and talked about the pres­sure that she gets from her peers for her open pro-​life stance.

It seemed to me in many ways Natasha and Olivia were very alike and as I pon­dered it some­thing clicked in my head. I asked Joyce (the protest leader for our Pro-​life group) If I could speak to the group before leav­ing and she agreed.

I asked them to pray for the folks on the other side not­ing that some of the great­est pro-​life war­riors of our age started out on the other side and for all we know one of those young peo­ple (and most of them were col­lege age with a few older fem­i­nists sprin­kled in) might be lead­ing our protests some day. On my way out I qui­etly asked a pair of peo­ple, strong in faith & prayer to pray for Natasha and found myself not only doing the same but adding her to my lengthy prayer list remem­ber­ing that God changes hearts.

That very day the news of McCor­vey, a.k.a. ‘Jane Roe,’ death broke:

She had a trou­bled, dif­fi­cult life, but even­tu­ally renounced her pro-​abortion views and con­verted to Catholicism

Her con­ver­sion story is here an excerpt in her own words

The sad story of my days as a pro-​choice activist, days that I am happy are long gone, is recounted in the book I am Roe. The mar­velous story of my jour­ney to a new life in Christ and the pro-​life move­ment is recounted in the book Won by Love. Now it is time to add a new chap­ter to the story of my life, because God had more in store for me even after He made me 100% pro-​life and washed me in the waters of baptism.

He wanted me to “come home,” a mes­sage that scared me at first, because I did not know what it meant.

Even­tu­ally she would fig­ure it out and become Catholic

The day finally arrived when I would be received into the Catholic Church. I did not have to be bap­tized again, because the Catholic Church rec­og­nizes the valid­ity of bap­tism by flow­ing water in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. So the cer­e­mony, sched­uled for August 17, 1998 at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Dal­las, was a Mass dur­ing which I would pro­fess my adher­ence to all that the Catholic Church offi­cially teaches, and would receive the Sacra­ments of Con­fir­ma­tion and of First Holy Communion.

I did not want this day to be a media event. No part of my jour­ney of con­ver­sion was for the media; it was for God. I did not want dis­trac­tions, or a dis­tor­tion of the day’s true meaning…The first time Fr. Frank Pavone inter­viewed me for his radio pro­gram, he started by say­ing, “So you are the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade.” “No Father,” I responded, “I was the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade, but now I am a new cre­ation in Christ. I am Roe no more!”

The pri­mary goal of us in the pro-​life move­ment is to save lives, both the lives of the child (and all those gen­er­a­tions that would fol­low) and the life of the mother, father and all of those who will suf­fer, some­times in silence, and some­times in pub­lic over abortion.

But the 2nd goal is to change hearts and minds, because it will be those changed hearts and changed minds that will make the first goal pos­si­ble and will even more impor­tantly lead to changed souls.

And it’s a changed soul that is the dif­fer­ent between eter­nal life and eter­nal death which in the end is the bot­tom line we will all face.

Right now I have a lot on my plate and I sus­pect so do you but I’d ask that you add a daily prayer for both Natasha and Oliva, may they both, like the brother in scrip­ture, find them­selves in the end together in their father’s house, one there from the start, and the other after a wrong turn and a long detour, but both in the end together in celebration.

That’s a result worth pray­ing for.


2016 Fabulous 50 Blog AwardsCPAC is paid for but the emer­gency room and sur­gi­cal bills for DaW­ife will start com­ing in soon and our insur­ance is not what it once was (thanks Democ­rats and Oba­macare!) so if are so inclined and in a posi­tion to do so please con­sider hit­ting DaTipJar




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At the last minute my scheduled extra shift was cancelled and I found myself able to briefly attended the anti-abortion protest in Fitchburg which while part of a series of national protests for defending planned parenthood was delayed a week by winter storms.

In the seven years that Planned Parenthood has been in Fitchburg there have been many demonstrations there and lots of prayer but over the last year our friends on the left started counting protesting so there were two distinct groups, one near the entrance of the parking garage that was prolife and wanting to defund planned parenthood

And one directly opposite the “clinic” that was in favor of abortion and planned parenthood

When we first started protesting planned parenthood before the building even opened we had no opposition (unless you count the painter working on the building before they opened who told me that said if it gets rid of some of the Spanish in town he’s all for it) the other side never bothered to counter protest. It speaks well of the effectiveness of the pro-life prayers that our foes now, in the last year have found it necessary to counter us (if we had no effect then they’d ignore us) and it speaks even better of us that in a college town in this bluest of states we outnumbered them on a Saturday, but the most interesting part of my brief visit was completely unexpected.

At one point as the rosary began a young lady from the other side walked over and started engaging one of our group, the organizer, not wanting the prayers to be interrupted, asked her to postpone her engagement until the prayer was done at which time they’d be happy to talk to her but I was intrigued, so I walked over to her and we spoke literally between the two groups.

Other than age we had a lot in common, we attended the same university (although it was a college when I was there before she was born) we were both engineers (although she has a double major) but most important of all she was willing to talk to people she disagreed with which suggests both curiosity and a liking for people, this and her civility given what we’ve seen in the land is rare and should always be encouraged.

At this point I offered to interview her and she consented (which given my association with the other side shows a level of trust I’ve rarely experienced when engaging opponents)

I thought she did quite well, particularly on the question of funding and after the interview we talked briefly. She said that I had given her things to think about.

Meanwhile I moved back to my side of the aisle and there I found Olivia who also consented to an interview. She was a few years younger than Natasha and talked about the pressure that she gets from her peers for her open pro-life stance.

It seemed to me in many ways Natasha and Olivia were very alike and as I pondered it something clicked in my head. I asked Joyce (the protest leader for our Pro-life group) If I could speak to the group before leaving and she agreed.

I asked them to pray for the folks on the other side noting that some of the greatest pro-life warriors of our age started out on the other side and for all we know one of those young people (and most of them were college age with a few older feminists sprinkled in) might be leading our protests some day. On my way out I quietly asked a pair of people, strong in faith & prayer to pray for Natasha and found myself not only doing the same but adding her to my lengthy prayer list remembering that God changes hearts.

That very day the news of McCorvey, a.k.a. ‘Jane Roe,’ death broke:

She had a troubled, difficult life, but eventually renounced her pro-abortion views and converted to Catholicism

Her conversion story is here an excerpt in her own words

The sad story of my days as a pro-choice activist, days that I am happy are long gone, is recounted in the book I am Roe. The marvelous story of my journey to a new life in Christ and the pro-life movement is recounted in the book Won by Love. Now it is time to add a new chapter to the story of my life, because God had more in store for me even after He made me 100% pro-life and washed me in the waters of baptism.

He wanted me to “come home,” a message that scared me at first, because I did not know what it meant.

Eventually she would figure it out and become Catholic

The day finally arrived when I would be received into the Catholic Church. I did not have to be baptized again, because the Catholic Church recognizes the validity of baptism by flowing water in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. So the ceremony, scheduled for August 17, 1998 at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Dallas, was a Mass during which I would profess my adherence to all that the Catholic Church officially teaches, and would receive the Sacraments of Confirmation and of First Holy Communion.

I did not want this day to be a media event. No part of my journey of conversion was for the media; it was for God. I did not want distractions, or a distortion of the day’s true meaning…The first time Fr. Frank Pavone interviewed me for his radio program, he started by saying, “So you are the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade.” “No Father,” I responded, “I was the Jane Roe of Roe vs. Wade, but now I am a new creation in Christ. I am Roe no more!”

The primary goal of us in the pro-life movement is to save lives, both the lives of the child (and all those generations that would follow) and the life of the mother, father and all of those who will suffer, sometimes in silence, and sometimes in public over abortion.

But the 2nd goal is to change hearts and minds, because it will be those changed hearts and changed minds that will make the first goal possible and will even more importantly lead to changed souls.

And it’s a changed soul that is the different between eternal life and eternal death which in the end is the bottom line we will all face.

Right now I have a lot on my plate and I suspect so do you but I’d ask that you add a daily prayer for both Natasha and Oliva, may they both, like the brother in scripture, find themselves in the end together in their father’s house, one there from the start, and the other after a wrong turn and a long detour, but both in the end together in celebration.

That’s a result worth praying for.


2016 Fabulous 50 Blog AwardsCPAC is paid for but the emergency room and surgical bills for DaWife will start coming in soon and our insurance is not what it once was (thanks Democrats and Obamacare!) so if are so inclined and in a position to do so please consider hitting DaTipJar




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Remember all subscribers get my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.


Choose a Subscription level