World Trade Center Bombing 24th Anniversary

Readability

World Trade Center Bombing 24th Anniversary

Never For­get. That’s what we said after the islamic ter­ror­ist attacks that occurred on Sep­tem­ber 11, 2001, but many barely remem­ber any­more, to our great dis­grace. That was the sec­ond time the Twin Tow­ers in Man­hat­tan were attacked, but it seems the world was eager to for­get the first World Trade Cen­ter bomb­ing, which hap­pened on Feb­ru­ary 26, 1993 — twenty-​four years ago this Sunday.

St. Peter’s Church is near the World Trade Cen­ter; here is what they have to say about that day:

Feb­ru­ary 26, 1993, a truck loaded with bombs, parked in a pub­lic garage below the North Tower of the World Trade Cen­ter and exploded. Ter­ror­ists set of the pow­er­ful home­made bomb by way of a twenty-​foot fuse. The blast killed six inno­cent civil­ians. The bomb was pow­er­ful enough to cre­ate a 200 by 100 foot hole in the build­ing. Approx­i­mately a thou­sand office work­ers suf­fered smoke inhala­tion injuries. One hun­dred and twenty four of those injured were res­cue per­son­nel. Sev­en­teen kinder­garten­ers were trapped when the elec­tri­cal power line was knocked out and one woman in labor was air­lifted out of the area to a hospital.

The ter­ror­ists intended for the North Tower to come crash­ing down and top­ple the South Tower. Seven men have been con­victed for their role in the attack but only six have been caught.

Many have for­got­ten the first truck bomb­ing of the World Trade Cen­ter in the wake of 911. A son of a vic­tim in the attacks, Stephen Knapp Jr., is quoted in the New York Times: “It started on Feb. 26, it played out on 9/​11, and it is still going on now.”

Our Parish has not for­got­ten. Every Feb­ru­ary, the fam­i­lies and friends of peo­ple who died and those who were injured, hold a memo­r­ial Mass at St. Peter’s Church.

The per­son cred­ited as being the mas­ter­mind behind this evil act of islamic jihad, the so called “blind sheikh”, Omar Abdel-​Rahman, died this past Sat­ur­day in prison, but he was treated to a grand funeral that was attended by thou­sands of admir­ers in Egypt:

He was con­victed in the World Trade Cen­ter bomb­ing — as well as plot­ting a wider “war of urban ter­ror­ism” — in 1995. His death was met with state­ments of mourn­ing from al Qaeda and the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood. Mean­while, his home­town was filled with chants of “we will defend you with blood and soul, Islam” for his funeral. “If he were a bad man, peo­ple from all over the coun­try wouldn’t have came to attend his funeral,” said a lawyer who trav­eled more than 100 miles to be there. MORE

Here is some more infor­ma­tion about the attack, via His​tory​.com:

In Sep­tem­ber 1992 explo­sives expert Ramzi Ahmed Yousef arrived in New York City on a flight from Pak­istan and began plan­ning an attack on the World Trade Cen­ter, with the alleged goal of top­pling the north tower into the south tower. He received help from fol­low­ers of Sheikh Omar Abdel Rah­man, a blind, Egyptian-​born Mus­lim cleric who spoke in ser­mons of destroy­ing the “edi­fices of cap­i­tal­ism.” The plot­ters rented a stor­age locker in New Jer­sey, where they stock­piled urea, nitric acid, sul­fu­ric acid and other ingre­di­ents for mak­ing bombs. They simul­ta­ne­ously con­cocted a nitro­glyc­erin trig­ger at a nearby apart­ment and scouted out the World Trade Center’s under­ground floors.

On Feb­ru­ary 26, 1993, the plot­ters loaded their home­made bomb, which weighed about 1,200 pounds, into a yel­low Ford Econo­line van they had rented from a Ryder deal­er­ship in New Jer­sey. Two of them then drove it across the Hud­son River into Man­hat­tan, made their way south to the World Trade Cen­ter, entered the base­ment park­ing garage between the north tower and a hotel, parked in an ille­gal spot on a ramp, lit four 20-​foot fuses, got into a car that had trailed them and sped off.

At 12:17 p.m. the bomb exploded, knock­ing out the World Trade Center’s sprin­klers, gen­er­a­tors, ele­va­tors, pub­lic address sys­tem, emer­gency com­mand cen­ter and more than half of the high-​voltage lines that fed elec­tric­ity to the com­plex. The FBI later called it the “largest by weight and by dam­age of any impro­vised explo­sive device that we’ve seen since the incep­tion of foren­sic explo­sive iden­ti­fi­ca­tion.” Six peo­ple died, includ­ing a preg­nant woman. More than 1,000 oth­ers were injured, mostly from smoke that snaked its way up the stair­wells and ele­va­tor shafts. Yet both tow­ers remained standing.

As res­cue work­ers dug for vic­tims, sur­vivors began mak­ing their way out by any means pos­si­ble. A woman in a wheel­chair was car­ried down 66 flights of stairs by two friends. A class of singing kinder­gart­ners descended from the 107th floor. A group of engi­neers stuck in an ele­va­tor pried open the doors and then used car keys to cut a hole in the sheetrock walls lead­ing out to a 58th-​floor women’s bath­room. Nearly 30 peo­ple with med­ical con­di­tions were taken to the roof and whisked away by police heli­copter. By late that night, the build­ings had been com­pletely cleared. They would not reopen for nearly a month.

Inves­ti­ga­tors sift­ing through the rub­ble soon came across the vehi­cle iden­ti­fi­ca­tion num­ber for the rental van, which had been reported stolen the day before the attack. FBI agents then arrested Moham­mad Salameh, who had rented the van under his own name, when he returned to the Ryder deal­er­ship to ask for his $400 deposit back. Sub­se­quent arrests were made of Ahmad Ajaj, Nidal Ayyad and Mah­moud Abouhal­ima. In March 1994 a fed­eral jury con­victed the four of them for their role in the bomb­ing, and they were each sen­tenced to life behind bars.

Mean­while, author­i­ties uncov­ered a related plot in which fol­low­ers of Sheikh Abdel Rah­man planned to blow up the George Wash­ing­ton Bridge, the United Nations head­quar­ters and other New York City land­marks. In that case, the sheikh and nine co-​defendants were found guilty of sedi­tious con­spir­acy and other terrorism-​related charges. A third case led to life sen­tences for Yousef, who was cap­tured in Pak­istan in 1995, and the dri­ver of the rental van, who was cap­tured in Jor­dan that same year. Only one sus­pect, who fled to Iraq after being ques­tioned and released by the FBI, remains at large.

Heck­uva guy, that Rah­man, huh? This is who they cel­e­brate, as our own mur­dered dead are largely for­got­ten by our country.

This Sun­day, please remem­ber: John DiGio­vanni, Robert Kirk­patrick, Stephen A. Knapp, William Macko, Wil­fredo Mer­cado, and, Mon­ica Rodriguez Smith and her unborn child. Please remem­ber their fam­i­lies, and remem­ber all who were wounded that day as well. Please pray for an end to islamic terrorism.

*******

MJ Steven­son, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla of the Resis­tance at MareZilla​.com. She lives in a wood­land shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her fam­ily and a large pack of guardian com­pan­ion ani­mals – includ­ing Siber­ian Husky Dal­ma­t­ian Lab Pup­pies and their par­ents.

See also by Zilla at DaTechGuyBlog:

Remem­ber­ing Saint Scholastica

#NYCatholic: St. Peter’s Church

Never Forget. That’s what we said after the islamic terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, but many barely remember anymore, to our great disgrace. That was the second time the Twin Towers in Manhattan were attacked, but it seems the world was eager to forget the first World Trade Center bombing, which happened on February 26, 1993 – twenty-four years ago this Sunday.

St. Peter’s Church is near the World Trade Center; here is what they have to say about that day:

February 26, 1993, a truck loaded with bombs, parked in a public garage below the North Tower of the World Trade Center and exploded.  Terrorists set of the powerful homemade bomb by way of a twenty-foot fuse.  The blast killed six innocent civilians.  The bomb was powerful enough to create a 200 by 100 foot hole in the building.  Approximately a thousand office workers suffered smoke inhalation injuries.  One hundred and twenty four of those injured were rescue personnel.  Seventeen kindergarteners were trapped when the electrical power line was knocked out and one woman in labor was airlifted out of the area to a hospital.

The terrorists intended for the North Tower to come crashing down and topple the South Tower. Seven men have been convicted for their role in the attack but only six have been caught.

Many have forgotten the first truck bombing of the World Trade Center in the wake of 9/11.  A son of a victim in the attacks, Stephen Knapp Jr., is quoted in the New York Times:  “It started on Feb. 26, it played out on 9/11, and it is still going on now.”

Our Parish has not forgotten.  Every February, the families and friends of people who died and those who were injured, hold a memorial Mass at St. Peter’s Church.

The person credited as being the mastermind behind this evil act of islamic jihad, the so called “blind sheikh”, Omar Abdel-Rahman, died this past Saturday in prison, but he was treated to a grand funeral that was attended by thousands of admirers in Egypt:

He was convicted in the World Trade Center bombing—as well as plotting a wider “war of urban terrorism”—in 1995. His death was met with statements of mourning from al Qaeda and the Muslim Brotherhood. Meanwhile, his hometown was filled with chants of “we will defend you with blood and soul, Islam” for his funeral. “If he were a bad man, people from all over the country wouldn’t have came to attend his funeral,” said a lawyer who traveled more than 100 miles to be there.     MORE

Here  is some more information about the attack, via History.com:

In September 1992 explosives expert Ramzi Ahmed Yousef arrived in New York City on a flight from Pakistan and began planning an attack on the World Trade Center, with the alleged goal of toppling the north tower into the south tower. He received help from followers of Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, a blind, Egyptian-born Muslim cleric who spoke in sermons of destroying the “edifices of capitalism.” The plotters rented a storage locker in New Jersey, where they stockpiled urea, nitric acid, sulfuric acid and other ingredients for making bombs. They simultaneously concocted a nitroglycerin trigger at a nearby apartment and scouted out the World Trade Center’s underground floors.

On February 26, 1993, the plotters loaded their homemade bomb, which weighed about 1,200 pounds, into a yellow Ford Econoline van they had rented from a Ryder dealership in New Jersey. Two of them then drove it across the Hudson River into Manhattan, made their way south to the World Trade Center, entered the basement parking garage between the north tower and a hotel, parked in an illegal spot on a ramp, lit four 20-foot fuses, got into a car that had trailed them and sped off.

At 12:17 p.m. the bomb exploded, knocking out the World Trade Center’s sprinklers, generators, elevators, public address system, emergency command center and more than half of the high-voltage lines that fed electricity to the complex. The FBI later called it the “largest by weight and by damage of any improvised explosive device that we’ve seen since the inception of forensic explosive identification.” Six people died, including a pregnant woman. More than 1,000 others were injured, mostly from smoke that snaked its way up the stairwells and elevator shafts. Yet both towers remained standing.

As rescue workers dug for victims, survivors began making their way out by any means possible. A woman in a wheelchair was carried down 66 flights of stairs by two friends. A class of singing kindergartners descended from the 107th floor. A group of engineers stuck in an elevator pried open the doors and then used car keys to cut a hole in the sheetrock walls leading out to a 58th-floor women’s bathroom. Nearly 30 people with medical conditions were taken to the roof and whisked away by police helicopter. By late that night, the buildings had been completely cleared. They would not reopen for nearly a month.

Investigators sifting through the rubble soon came across the vehicle identification number for the rental van, which had been reported stolen the day before the attack. FBI agents then arrested Mohammad Salameh, who had rented the van under his own name, when he returned to the Ryder dealership to ask for his $400 deposit back. Subsequent arrests were made of Ahmad Ajaj, Nidal Ayyad and Mahmoud Abouhalima. In March 1994 a federal jury convicted the four of them for their role in the bombing, and they were each sentenced to life behind bars.

Meanwhile, authorities uncovered a related plot in which followers of Sheikh Abdel Rahman planned to blow up the George Washington Bridge, the United Nations headquarters and other New York City landmarks. In that case, the sheikh and nine co-defendants were found guilty of seditious conspiracy and other terrorism-related charges. A third case led to life sentences for Yousef, who was captured in Pakistan in 1995, and the driver of the rental van, who was captured in Jordan that same year. Only one suspect, who fled to Iraq after being questioned and released by the FBI, remains at large.

Heckuva guy, that Rahman, huh? This is who they celebrate, as our own murdered dead are largely forgotten by our country.

This Sunday, please remember: John DiGiovanni, Robert Kirkpatrick, Stephen A. Knapp, William Macko, Wilfredo Mercado, and, Monica Rodriguez Smith and her unborn child. Please remember their families, and remember all who were wounded that day as well. Please pray for an end to islamic terrorism.

*******

MJ Stevenson, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla of the Resistance at MareZilla.com. She lives in a woodland shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her family and a large pack of guardian companion animals – including Siberian Husky Dalmatian Lab Puppies and their parents. 

See also by Zilla at DaTechGuyBlog:

Remembering Saint Scholastica

#NYCatholic: St. Peter’s Church