Series review: Hell on Wheels

Readability

Series review: Hell on Wheels

By John Ruberry

So you’ll be pay­ing your­self to build a rail­road with gov­ern­ment sub­si­dies.” Sen. Jor­dan Crane to Thomas “Doc” Durant.

These are excit­ing times. You and I are open­ing the way for the great­est nation the world has ever seen.” Major Augus­tus Ben­dix to Cullen Bohannon.

See him dri­ving those golden nails
that hold together the sil­ver bars
That one day’s gonna take us to the stars
cos he’s the man who built Amer­ica.“
Horslips, from their song, The Man Who Built America.

A new chap­ter of Amer­i­can great­ness is now begin­ning. A new national pride is sweep­ing across our nation. And a new surge of opti­mism is plac­ing impos­si­ble dreams firmly within our grasp. What we are wit­ness­ing today is the renewal of the Amer­i­can spirit.” Pres­i­dent Don­ald J. Trump to Con­gress last week.

Last week I com­pleted my lat­est binge-​watching endeavor, Hell on Wheels, an AMC show that ran from 20112016 that is avail­able on Net­flix and on Amazon.

The build­ing of the Amer­i­can transcon­ti­nen­tal is the dri­ving force of the plot of this series – the Union Pacific head­ing west from Omaha and the Cen­tral Pacific head­ing east from Sacramento.

The transcon­ti­nen­tal rail­road exem­pli­fied Amer­ica at its best – get­ting the job done 16 years before Canada and 36 years before Rus­sia. It also exem­pli­fied Amer­ica at its worst. Racism and cor­rup­tion – the Crédit Mobilier out­rage was one of our nation’s worst polit­i­cal scan­dals and it for­ever tainted this mon­u­men­tal achievement.

The Civil War purged Amer­ica of slav­ery, the nation was no longer “a house divided against itself,” but in 1865 the United States was in a way like an uncom­pleted jig­saw puz­zle, the east and west coasts, the easy part, were set­tled but much of the mid­dle – the Great Plains and the Rocky Moun­tains, still needed to be filled in.

Hell on Wheel’s main char­ac­ter is Cullen Bohan­non (Anson Mount), a for­mer slave­holder and Con­fed­er­ate cav­alry offi­cer who trav­els to Nebraska Ter­ri­tory to hunt down Union sol­diers who mur­dered his wife and son in Mis­sis­sippi. Despite that ruth­less­ness – make that because of that ruth­less­ness – Union Pacific pres­i­dent Thomas “Doc” Durant (Colm Meaney) takes him under his wing, although their rela­tion­ship is mostly tur­bu­lent through­out the run of the series.

Bohan­non isn’t the only char­ac­ter scarred by the tur­moil of mid-​19th cen­tury Amer­ica. Elam Fer­gu­son (Com­mon) and Psalms Jack­son (Dohn Nor­wood) are freed­men who quickly learn that free­dom from slav­ery doesn’t mean equal­ity. The Rev­erend Nathaniel Cole (Tom Noo­nan) and his daugh­ter Ruth (Kasha Kropin­ski), suf­fer from pangs of guilt remain­ing from Bleed­ing Kansas. The Rev. Cole’s most promi­nent con­vert to Chris­tian­ity, Joseph Black Moon (Eddie Spears), is estranged from his father, a Cheyenne chief. The most com­pelling char­ac­ter on the show, Thor “The Swede” Gun­der­son (Christo­pher Hey­er­dahl), is a Nor­we­gian immi­grant and for­mer Union army quar­ter­mas­ter – a man who says he is good with num­bers, but after his bar­baric incar­cer­a­tion at the noto­ri­ous Ander­son­ville pris­oner of war camp, he ascer­tained that “I had to con­trol peo­ple like I con­trol num­bers and I learned to prac­tice a sort of immoral mathematics.”

The Swede is Hell On Wheels’ prin­ci­pal vil­lain and if there is ever a Vil­lains Hall Of Fame built, then he belongs as a char­ter member.

Another intrigu­ing HoW char­ac­ter is Irish immi­grant Mickey McGuinnes (Phil Burke), who like Durant, finds a way to make him­self a suc­cess after start­ing with noth­ing. One of his work­ers is a tat­tooed for­mer pros­ti­tute and a Jack Mor­mon, Eva (Robin McLeavy). She was cap­tured by Indi­ans after her family’s wagon train was waylaid.

The final sea­son of Hell on Wheels brings in the sto­ry­line of the Cen­tral Pacific. Movie posters for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly boasted, “For three men the Civil War wasn’t hell. It was prac­tice!” The Chi­nese labor­ers on the Cen­tral Pacific can be for­given for hav­ing a sim­i­lar dis­mis­sive view of our Civil War, which killed 600,000 Amer­i­cans. Emo­tional scars from the Taip­ing Rebel­lion plague many of the Chi­nese char­ac­ters. That con­flict, which was actu­ally a civil war between Impe­r­ial China and a man claim­ing to be the brother of Jesus Christ, prob­a­bly killed 2030 mil­lion peo­ple – after the famine deaths are added in. Some esti­mates bring the death total as high as 100 mil­lion. If that last fig­ure is cor­rect, then the Taip­ing Rebel­lion was the dead­liest war ever.

Life is cheap in both the Union Pacific and Cen­tral Pacific camps – both are served by broth­els, although opium is offered at the lat­ter instead of whiskey.

Durant was a real per­son, although his por­trayal in Hell on Wheels is largely fic­tional. Other his­tor­i­cal fig­ures appear­ing include Wyoming’s ter­ri­to­r­ial gov­er­nor John Camp­bell (Jack Weber), Pres­i­dent Ulysses S. Grant (Vic­tor Slezak), and Brigham Young (Gregg Henry). Eva’s char­ac­ter was based on an actual woman, as was the man in the show who sur­vived a scalp­ing. He car­ries his scalp in a bot­tle of alco­hol – and offers paid lis­ten­ers a recount­ing of his ordeal. The phrase “Hell on Wheels” is a real one in this con­text, it’s what the tent cities that fol­lowed the con­struc­tion of the Union Pacific were called.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_95770” align=“alignright” width=“231”] Blog­ger walk­ing the rails[/caption]

In the penul­ti­mate HoW episode, there is a pre­scient moment as black and Chi­nese work­ers rush to fin­ish the road in 1869. Above them you see the moon. One hun­dred years later, yes, in 1969, “the great­est nation the world has ever seen” reached the moon. No coun­try has repeated that feat or even attempted it.

Yes, Amer­i­can excep­tion­al­ism is real.

If you enjoy west­erns, you’ll find Hell on Wheels worth your while. But if you are look­ing for romance – then look else­where. Mount is a fine actor but love encoun­ters are not his long suit. And what was the point of his sex scene on top of a table with fused nitro­glyc­er­ine on it?

As with most west­erns, the cin­e­matog­ra­phy is first-​rate – with Alberta fill­ing in capa­bly for Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, and Cal­i­for­nia. It would be bet­ter if movies about Amer­ica would be filmed here, but that’s another sub­ject for another time.

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

By John Ruberry

“So you’ll be paying yourself to build a railroad with government subsidies.” Sen. Jordan Crane to Thomas “Doc” Durant.

“These are exciting times. You and I are opening the way for the greatest nation the world has ever seen.” Major Augustus Bendix to Cullen Bohannon.

“See him driving those golden nails
that hold together the silver bars
That one day’s gonna take us to the stars
cos he’s the man who built America.”
Horslips, from their song, The Man Who Built America.

“A new chapter of American greatness is now beginning. A new national pride is sweeping across our nation. And a new surge of optimism is placing impossible dreams firmly within our grasp. What we are witnessing today is the renewal of the American spirit.” President Donald J. Trump to Congress last week.

Last week I completed my latest binge-watching endeavor, Hell on Wheels, an AMC show that ran from 2011-2016 that is available on Netflix and on Amazon.

The building of the American transcontinental is the driving force of the plot of this series–the Union Pacific heading west from Omaha and the Central Pacific heading east from Sacramento.

The transcontinental railroad exemplified America at its best–getting the job done 16 years before Canada and 36 years before Russia. It also exemplified America at its worst. Racism and corruption–the Crédit Mobilier outrage was one of our nation’s worst political scandals and it forever tainted this monumental achievement.

The Civil War purged America of slavery, the nation was no longer “a house divided against itself,” but in 1865 the United States was in a way like an uncompleted jigsaw puzzle, the east and west coasts, the easy part, were settled but much of the middle–the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains, still needed to be filled in.

Hell on Wheel’s main character is Cullen Bohannon (Anson Mount), a former slaveholder and Confederate cavalry officer who travels to Nebraska Territory to hunt down Union soldiers who murdered his wife and son in Mississippi. Despite that ruthlessness–make that because of that ruthlessness–Union Pacific president Thomas “Doc” Durant (Colm Meaney) takes him under his wing, although their relationship is mostly turbulent throughout the run of the series.

Bohannon isn’t the only character scarred by the turmoil of mid-19th century America. Elam Ferguson (Common) and Psalms Jackson (Dohn Norwood) are freedmen who quickly learn that freedom from slavery doesn’t mean equality. The Reverend Nathaniel Cole (Tom Noonan) and his daughter Ruth (Kasha Kropinski), suffer from pangs of guilt remaining from Bleeding Kansas. The Rev. Cole’s most prominent convert to Christianity, Joseph Black Moon (Eddie Spears), is estranged from his father, a Cheyenne chief. The most compelling character on the show, Thor “The Swede” Gunderson (Christopher Heyerdahl), is a Norwegian immigrant and former Union army quartermaster–a man who says he is good with numbers, but after his barbaric incarceration at the notorious Andersonville prisoner of war camp, he ascertained that “I had to control people like I control numbers and I learned to practice a sort of immoral mathematics.”

The Swede is Hell On Wheels’ principal villain and if there is ever a Villains Hall Of Fame built, then he belongs as a charter member.

Another intriguing HoW character is Irish immigrant Mickey McGuinnes (Phil Burke), who like Durant, finds a way to make himself a success after starting with nothing. One of his workers is a tattooed former prostitute and a Jack Mormon, Eva (Robin McLeavy). She was captured by Indians after her family’s wagon train was waylaid.

The final season of Hell on Wheels brings in the storyline of the Central Pacific. Movie posters for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly boasted, “For three men the Civil War wasn’t hell. It was practice!” The Chinese laborers on the Central Pacific can be forgiven for having a similar dismissive view of our Civil War, which killed 600,000 Americans. Emotional scars from the Taiping Rebellion plague many of the Chinese characters. That conflict, which was actually a civil war between Imperial China and a man claiming to be the brother of Jesus Christ, probably killed 20-30 million people–after the famine deaths are added in. Some estimates bring the death total as high as 100 million. If that last figure is correct, then the Taiping Rebellion was the deadliest war ever.

Life is cheap in both the Union Pacific and Central Pacific camps–both are served by brothels, although opium is offered at the latter instead of whiskey.

Durant was a real person, although his portrayal in Hell on Wheels is largely fictional. Other historical figures appearing include Wyoming’s territorial governor John Campbell (Jack Weber), President Ulysses S. Grant (Victor Slezak), and Brigham Young (Gregg Henry). Eva’s character was based on an actual woman, as was the man in the show who survived a scalping. He carries his scalp in a bottle of alcohol–and offers paid listeners a recounting of his ordeal. The phrase “Hell on Wheels” is a real one in this context, it’s what the tent cities that followed the construction of the Union Pacific were called.

Blogger walking the rails

In the penultimate HoW episode, there is a prescient moment as black and Chinese workers rush to finish the road in 1869. Above them you see the moon. One hundred years later, yes, in 1969, “the greatest nation the world has ever seen” reached the moon. No country has repeated that feat or even attempted it.

Yes, American exceptionalism is real.

If you enjoy westerns, you’ll find Hell on Wheels worth your while. But if you are looking for romance–then look elsewhere. Mount is a fine actor but love encounters are not his long suit. And what was the point of his sex scene on top of a table with fused nitroglycerine on it?

As with most westerns, the cinematography is first-rate–with Alberta filling in capably for Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, and California. It would be better if movies about America would be filmed here, but that’s another subject for another time.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.