40 Martyrs of Sebaste

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40 Martyrs of Sebaste

The 40 Mar­tyrs of Sebaste, also known as the Forty Mar­tyrs of Arme­nia and also as The Holy Forty, were a group of Roman Sol­diers who were cru­elly tor­tured and killed for their refusal to renounce their Chris­t­ian faith dur­ing the reign of Emperor Licinius in 320 AD. Their Feast Day is March 10 for Roman Catholics, and March 9 for those who belong to East­ern Ortho­dox Churches. Via EWTN’s online library, excerpted below is their story, as it was told in a homily by St. Basil, Bishop of Cae­sarea, on the Holy 40’s Feast Day:

These holy mar­tyrs suf­fered at Sebaste, in the Lesser Arme­nia, under the Emperor Licinius, in 320. They were of dif­fer­ent coun­tries, but enrolled in the same troop; all in the flower of their age, comely, brave, and robust, and were become con­sid­er­able for their ser­vices. St. Gre­gory of Nyssa and Pro­copius say they were of the Thun­der­ing Legion, so famous under Mar­cus Aure­lius for the mirac­u­lous rain and vic­tory obtained by their prayers. This was the twelfth legion, and then quar­tered in Arme­nia. Lysias was duke or gen­eral of the forces, and Agri­cola the gov­er­nor of the province. The lat­ter hav­ing sig­ni­fied to the army the orders of the emperor Licinius for all to sac­ri­fice, these forty went boldly up to him, and said they were Chris­tians, and that no tor­ments should make them ever aban­don their holy reli­gion. The judge first endeav­oured to gain them by mild usage; as by rep­re­sent­ing to them the dis­hon­our that would attend their refusal to do what was required, and by mak­ing them large promises of prefer­ment and high favour with the emperor in case of com­pli­ance. Find­ing these meth­ods of gen­tle­ness inef­fec­tual, he had recourse to threats, and these the most ter­ri­fy­ing, if they con­tin­ued dis­obe­di­ent to the emperor’s order, but all in vain. To his promises they answered that he could give them noth­ing equal to what he would deprive them of; and to his threats, that his power only extended over their bod­ies which they had learned to despise when their souls were at stake. The gov­er­nor, find­ing them all res­olute, caused them to be torn with whips, and their sides to be rent with iron hooks; after which they were loaded with chains, and com­mit­ted to jail.

Days had passed, and the men still would not aban­don their Faith, which of course did not go over well with their tormentors:

The gov­er­nor, highly offended at their courage, and that lib­erty of speech with which they accosted him, devised an extra­or­di­nary kind of death, which, being slow and severe, he hoped would shake their con­stancy. The cold in Arme­nia is very sharp, espe­cially in March, and towards the end of win­ter, when the wind is north, as it then was, it being also at that time a severe frost. Under the walls of the town stood a pond, which was frozen so hard that it would bear walk­ing upon with safety. The judge ordered the saints to be exposed quite naked on the ice;[1] and in order to tempt them the more pow­er­fully to renounce their faith, a warm bath was pre­pared at a small dis­tance from the frozen pond, for any of this com­pany to go to who were dis­posed to pur­chase their tem­po­ral ease and safety on that con­di­tion. The mar­tyrs, on hear­ing their sen­tence, ran joy­fully to the place, and with­out wait­ing to be stripped, undressed them­selves, encour­ag­ing one another in the same man­ner as is usual among sol­diers in mil­i­tary expe­di­tions attended with hard­ships and dan­gers, say­ing that one bad night would pur­chase them a happy eternity.[2] They also made this their joint prayer: “Lord, we are forty who arc engaged in this com­bat; grant that we may be forty crowned, and that not one be want­ing to this sacred num­ber.” The guards in the mean time ceased not to per­suade them to sac­ri­fice, that by so doing they might be allowed to pass to the warm bath. But though it is not easy to form a just idea of the bit­ter pain they must have under­gone, of the whole num­ber only one had the mis­for­tune to be over­come; who, los­ing courage, went off from the pond to seek the relief in readi­ness for such as were dis­posed to renounce their faith; but as the devil usu­ally deceives his ador­ers, the apos­tate no sooner entered the warm water but he expired. This mis­for­tune afflicted the mar­tyrs; but they were quickly com­forted by see­ing his place and their num­ber mirac­u­lously filled up. A sen­tinel was warm­ing him­self near the bath, hav­ing been posted there to observe if any of the mar­tyrs were inclined to sub­mit. While he was attend­ing, he had a vision of blessed spir­its descend­ing from heaven on the mar­tyrs, and dis­trib­ut­ing, as from their king, rich presents and pre­cious gar­ments; St. Ephrem adds crowns to all these gen­er­ous sol­diers, one only excepted, who was their faint-​hearted com­pan­ion already men­tioned. The guard, being struck with the celes­tial vision and the apostate’s deser­tion, was con­verted upon it; and by a par­tic­u­lar motion of the Holy Ghost, threw off his clothes, and placed him­self in his stead amongst the thirty-​nine mar­tyrs. Thus God heard their request, though in another man­ner than they imag­ined: “Which ought to make us adore the impen­e­tra­ble secrets of his mercy and jus­tice,” says St. Ephrem, “in this instance, no less than in the repro­ba­tion of Judas and the elec­tion of St. Matthias.”

And so there were still forty of them, naked and freez­ing, on the iced over lake, all night long. In the morn­ing, it was ordered that, whether already dead or still yet show­ing signs of life, the loyal Chris­t­ian men’s bod­ies would be loaded onto carts and then burned until noth­ing was left of them. Even the mother of the youngest man remained unshaken in her loy­alty to God when she found her son, who was still alive at the time:

When the rest were thrown into a wag­gon to be car­ried to the pile, the youngest of them (whom the acts call Melito) was found alive; and the exe­cu­tion­ers, hop­ing he would change his res­o­lu­tion when he came to him­self, left him behind. His mother, a woman of mean con­di­tion, and a widow, but rich in faith and wor­thy to have a son a mar­tyr, observ­ing this false com­pas­sion, reproached the exe­cu­tion­ers; and when she came up to her son, whom she found quite frozen, not able to stir, and scarce breath­ing, he looked on her with lan­guish­ing eyes, and made a lit­tle sign with his weak hand to com­fort her. She exhorted him to per­se­vere to the end, and, for­ti­fied by the Holy Ghost, took him up, and put him with her own hands into the wag­gon with the rest of the mar­tyrs, not only with­out shed­ding a tear, but with a coun­te­nance full of joy, say­ing coura­geously: “Go, go, son, pro­ceed to the end of this happy jour­ney with thy com­pan­ions, that thou mayest not be the last of them that shall present them­selves before God.”

After they were burned, the ashes of the Mar­tyrs were thrown away in a river, but other Chris­tians had man­aged to col­lect some ashes and they car­ried them away as reli­gious relics.

As we remem­ber the brave and loyal men who died nearly 2000 years ago for their faith in what is now Syria, let us also please remem­ber and pray for Chris­tians around the world who are still rou­tinely per­se­cuted, tor­tured, and mur­dered for their faith to this very day.

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MJ Steven­son, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla at MareZilla​.com. She lives in a wood­land shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her fam­ily and a large pack of guardian com­pan­ion ani­mals – includ­ing Siber­ian Husky Dal­ma­t­ian Lab Pup­pies and their par­ents.

See also by Zilla at DaTechGuyBlog:

Remem­ber­ing Saint Scholastica

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World Trade Cen­ter Bomb­ing 24th Anniversary

Remem­ber­ing Saint Katharine Drexel

The 40 Martyrs of Sebaste, also known as the Forty Martyrs of Armenia and also as The Holy Forty, were a group of Roman Soldiers who were cruelly tortured and killed for their refusal to renounce their Christian faith during the reign of Emperor Licinius in 320 AD. Their Feast Day is March 10 for Roman Catholics, and March 9 for those who belong to Eastern Orthodox Churches. Via EWTN‘s online library, excerpted below is their story, as it was told in a homily by St. Basil, Bishop of Caesarea, on the Holy 40’s Feast Day:

These holy martyrs suffered at Sebaste, in the Lesser Armenia, under the Emperor Licinius, in 320. They were of different countries, but enrolled in the same troop; all in the flower of their age, comely, brave, and robust, and were become considerable for their services. St. Gregory of Nyssa and Procopius say they were of the Thundering Legion, so famous under Marcus Aurelius for the miraculous rain and victory obtained by their prayers. This was the twelfth legion, and then quartered in Armenia. Lysias was duke or general of the forces, and Agricola the governor of the province. The latter having signified to the army the orders of the emperor Licinius for all to sacrifice, these forty went boldly up to him, and said they were Christians, and that no torments should make them ever abandon their holy religion. The judge first endeavoured to gain them by mild usage; as by representing to them the dishonour that would attend their refusal to do what was required, and by making them large promises of preferment and high favour with the emperor in case of compliance. Finding these methods of gentleness ineffectual, he had recourse to threats, and these the most terrifying, if they continued disobedient to the emperor’s order, but all in vain. To his promises they answered that he could give them nothing equal to what he would deprive them of; and to his threats, that his power only extended over their bodies which they had learned to despise when their souls were at stake. The governor, finding them all resolute, caused them to be torn with whips, and their sides to be rent with iron hooks; after which they were loaded with chains, and committed to jail.

Days had passed, and the men still would not abandon their Faith, which of course did not go over well with their tormentors:

The governor, highly offended at their courage, and that liberty of speech with which they accosted him, devised an extraordinary kind of death, which, being slow and severe, he hoped would shake their constancy. The cold in Armenia is very sharp, especially in March, and towards the end of winter, when the wind is north, as it then was, it being also at that time a severe frost. Under the walls of the town stood a pond, which was frozen so hard that it would bear walking upon with safety. The judge ordered the saints to be exposed quite naked on the ice;[1] and in order to tempt them the more powerfully to renounce their faith, a warm bath was prepared at a small distance from the frozen pond, for any of this company to go to who were disposed to purchase their temporal ease and safety on that condition. The martyrs, on hearing their sentence, ran joyfully to the place, and without waiting to be stripped, undressed themselves, encouraging one another in the same manner as is usual among soldiers in military expeditions attended with hardships and dangers, saying that one bad night would purchase them a happy eternity.[2] They also made this their joint prayer: “Lord, we are forty who arc engaged in this combat; grant that we may be forty crowned, and that not one be wanting to this sacred number.” The guards in the mean time ceased not to persuade them to sacrifice, that by so doing they might be allowed to pass to the warm bath. But though it is not easy to form a just idea of the bitter pain they must have undergone, of the whole number only one had the misfortune to be overcome; who, losing courage, went off from the pond to seek the relief in readiness for such as were disposed to renounce their faith; but as the devil usually deceives his adorers, the apostate no sooner entered the warm water but he expired. This misfortune afflicted the martyrs; but they were quickly comforted by seeing his place and their number miraculously filled up. A sentinel was warming himself near the bath, having been posted there to observe if any of the martyrs were inclined to submit. While he was attending, he had a vision of blessed spirits descending from heaven on the martyrs, and distributing, as from their king, rich presents and precious garments; St. Ephrem adds crowns to all these generous soldiers, one only excepted, who was their faint-hearted companion already mentioned. The guard, being struck with the celestial vision and the apostate’s desertion, was converted upon it; and by a particular motion of the Holy Ghost, threw off his clothes, and placed himself in his stead amongst the thirty-nine martyrs. Thus God heard their request, though in another manner than they imagined: “Which ought to make us adore the impenetrable secrets of his mercy and justice,” says St. Ephrem, “in this instance, no less than in the reprobation of Judas and the election of St. Matthias.”

And so there were still forty of them, naked and freezing, on the iced over lake, all night long. In the morning, it was ordered that, whether already dead or still yet showing signs of life, the loyal Christian men’s bodies would be loaded onto carts and then burned until nothing was left of them. Even the mother of the youngest man remained unshaken in her loyalty to God when she found her son, who was still alive at the time:

When the rest were thrown into a waggon to be carried to the pile, the youngest of them (whom the acts call Melito) was found alive; and the executioners, hoping he would change his resolution when he came to himself, left him behind. His mother, a woman of mean condition, and a widow, but rich in faith and worthy to have a son a martyr, observing this false compassion, reproached the executioners; and when she came up to her son, whom she found quite frozen, not able to stir, and scarce breathing, he looked on her with languishing eyes, and made a little sign with his weak hand to comfort her. She exhorted him to persevere to the end, and, fortified by the Holy Ghost, took him up, and put him with her own hands into the waggon with the rest of the martyrs, not only without shedding a tear, but with a countenance full of joy, saying courageously: “Go, go, son, proceed to the end of this happy journey with thy companions, that thou mayest not be the last of them that shall present themselves before God.”

After they were burned, the ashes of the Martyrs were thrown away in a river, but other Christians had managed to collect some ashes and they carried them away as religious relics.

As we remember the brave and loyal men who died nearly 2000 years ago for their faith in what is now Syria, let us also please remember and pray for Christians around the world who are still routinely persecuted, tortured, and murdered for their faith to this very day.

*******

MJ Stevenson, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla at MareZilla.com. She lives in a woodland shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her family and a large pack of guardian companion animals – including Siberian Husky Dalmatian Lab Puppies and their parents. 

See also by Zilla at DaTechGuyBlog:

Remembering Saint Scholastica

#NYCatholic: St. Peter’s Church

World Trade Center Bombing 24th Anniversary

Remembering Saint Katharine Drexel