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From China With Love

China’s bid to influ­ence the 1996 elec­tion for Bill Clin­ton stands as one of the most damn­ing exam­ples of for­eign inter­fer­ence in the U.S. polit­i­cal process.

Unfor­tu­nately, the Chi­nese con­nec­tion has largely been for­got­ten, includ­ing its con­tin­u­a­tion in Hillary Clinton’s cam­paign in 2016.

Clinton’s 1996 re-​election cam­paign received mil­lions of dol­lars in ille­gal con­tri­bu­tions from Chi­nese donor that were chan­neled through the Demo­c­ra­tic National Com­mit­tee, accord­ing to a Sen­ate Com­mit­tee on Home­land Secu­rity and Gov­ern­ment Reform.

Johnny Chung, a busi­ness­man born in Tai­wan, had a part­ner, Liu Chaoy­ing, a high-​ranking mil­i­tary leader and intel­li­gence offi­cer in China. Liu wired hun­dreds of thou­sands of dol­lars, which ille­gally went to the DNC. The duo also sent cam­paign funds to U.S. Sen. John Kerry for his reelec­tion bid to the Sen­ate. Liu’s father was one of Mao’s fel­low travelers.

Chung vis­ited the White House nearly 50 times — most of them autho­rized by Hillary Clin­ton. In one visit, Hillary met with Chung and his vis­it­ing del­e­ga­tion of Chi­nese busi­ness­men from state-​run com­pa­nies. After another visit, Chung paid the DNC $50,000. In exchange, Chung was allowed to bring some of his investors to see the pres­i­dent deliver one of his radio addresses.

Another oper­a­tive for the Clin­tons was John Huang, who raised mil­lions of dol­lars for Dol­lar Bill in the Asian-​American com­mu­nity. In 1996, Huang bun­dled $3.4 mil­lion for the DNC — much of which was returned after a Sen­ate inves­ti­ga­tion found that the con­tri­bu­tions were illegal.

Char­lie Trie owned a restau­rant in Lit­tle Rock that was fre­quented by his friend then-​Governor Clin­ton. After Clin­ton won the pres­i­dency, Trie went to Wash­ing­ton to cash in on their friend­ship. He thought his asso­ci­a­tion could help him develop more busi­ness con­tacts in Asia. One of them was Hong Kong busi­ness­man Ng Lap Seng. Seng would wire a mil­lion dol­lars to Trie. From 1994 to 1996, Trie directly sent $200,000 to the DNC. Trie pro­vided the rest of the money to other peo­ple who later sent that money to the DNC. Trie also helped raised another $640,000 for Bill Clinton’s Legal Defense Fund.

Accord­ing to the House Com­mit­tee on Gov­ern­ment Reform and Over­sight, 94 peo­ple were called to tes­tify about the ille­gal cam­paign con­tri­bu­tions to the 1996 Clin­ton cam­paign and the DNC. Of nearly 100 peo­ple called before the com­mit­tee, 57 invoked the Fifth Amend­ment, 18 fled the coun­try and 19 for­eign wit­nesses refused to testify.

But the China con­nec­tion to the Clin­tons didn’t end there. A Chi­nese bil­lion­aire gave the Clin­ton Foun­da­tion $2 mil­lion in 2013. The Jus­tice Depart­ment inves­ti­gated the pay­ment from Wang Wen­liang, a for­mer del­e­gate to the Chi­nese par­lia­ment. No charges were filed.

Fast for­ward to Hillary’s 2016 cam­paign and the Wik­ileaks emails from the DNC.

The Chi­nese ambas­sador to the United States, Cui Tiankai, requested a meet­ing with Hillary Clinton’s top aides in Jan­u­ary 2016, accord­ing to an inter­nal email cir­cu­lated among the for­mer Sec­re­tary of State’s senior pres­i­den­tial cam­paign officials.

Chi­nese Ambas­sador Cui invited me over to the res­i­dence Tues­day for a cof­fee and to make a request. He wants to have an infor­mal, pri­vate, off the record get together with a few of us to dis­cuss the next year and the cur­rent state of US-​China affairs,” wrote Clin­ton cam­paign aide Kurt Camp­bell in the Jan. 7, 2016, email to cam­paign head John Podesta.

He asked me to host a social meal at my house in the next month. He was fairly insis­tent and indi­cated that he wanted to pass along some per­spec­tives. I told him I’d reach out to you all to see about your judge­ment [sic] on this and pos­si­ble avail­abil­ity. I’m happy to make some chili and corn­bread by the fire but let’s first decide whether this makes sense. Please let me know your think­ing,” Camp­bell wrote.

Some­how these deep con­nec­tions between the Clin­tons and the Chi­nese have gone mostly unno­ticed in the cur­rent ker­fuf­fle about for­eign involve­ment in pres­i­den­tial elections.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_95816” align=“alignleft” width=“150”] Christo­pher Harper is a vis­it­ing Scholar in China[/caption]

China’s bid to influence the 1996 election for Bill Clinton stands as one of the most damning examples of foreign interference in the U.S. political process.

Unfortunately, the Chinese connection has largely been forgotten, including its continuation in Hillary Clinton’s campaign in 2016.

Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign received millions of dollars in illegal contributions from Chinese donor that were channeled through the Democratic National Committee, according to a Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Reform.

Johnny Chung, a businessman born in Taiwan, had a partner, Liu Chaoying, a high-ranking military leader and intelligence officer in China. Liu wired hundreds of thousands of dollars, which illegally went to the DNC. The duo also sent campaign funds to U.S. Sen. John Kerry for his reelection bid to the Senate. Liu’s father was one of Mao’s fellow travelers.

Chung visited the White House nearly 50 times—most of them authorized by Hillary Clinton. In one visit, Hillary met with Chung and his visiting delegation of Chinese businessmen from state-run companies. After another visit, Chung paid the DNC $50,000. In exchange, Chung was allowed to bring some of his investors to see the president deliver one of his radio addresses.

Another operative for the Clintons was John Huang, who raised millions of dollars for Dollar Bill in the Asian-American community. In 1996, Huang bundled $3.4 million for the DNC—much of which was returned after a Senate investigation found that the contributions were illegal.

Charlie Trie owned a restaurant in Little Rock that was frequented by his friend then-Governor Clinton. After Clinton won the presidency, Trie went to Washington to cash in on their friendship. He thought his association could help him develop more business contacts in Asia. One of them was Hong Kong businessman Ng Lap Seng. Seng would wire a million dollars to Trie. From 1994 to 1996, Trie directly sent $200,000 to the DNC. Trie provided the rest of the money to other people who later sent that money to the DNC. Trie also helped raised another $640,000 for Bill Clinton’s Legal Defense Fund.

According to the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, 94 people were called to testify about the illegal campaign contributions to the 1996 Clinton campaign and the DNC. Of nearly 100 people called before the committee, 57 invoked the Fifth Amendment, 18 fled the country and 19 foreign witnesses refused to testify.

But the China connection to the Clintons didn’t end there. A Chinese billionaire gave the Clinton Foundation $2 million in 2013. The Justice Department investigated the payment from Wang Wenliang, a former delegate to the Chinese parliament. No charges were filed.

Fast forward to Hillary’s 2016 campaign and the Wikileaks emails from the DNC.

The Chinese ambassador to the United States, Cui Tiankai, requested a meeting with Hillary Clinton’s top aides in January 2016, according to an internal email circulated among the former Secretary of State’s senior presidential campaign officials.

“Chinese Ambassador Cui invited me over to the residence Tuesday for a coffee and to make a request. He wants to have an informal, private, off the record get together with a few of us to discuss the next year and the current state of US-China affairs,” wrote Clinton campaign aide Kurt Campbell in the Jan. 7, 2016, email to campaign head John Podesta.

“He asked me to host a social meal at my house in the next month. He was fairly insistent and indicated that he wanted to pass along some perspectives. I told him I’d reach out to you all to see about your judgement [sic] on this and possible availability. I’m happy to make some chili and cornbread by the fire but let’s first decide whether this makes sense. Please let me know your thinking,” Campbell wrote.

Somehow these deep connections between the Clintons and the Chinese have gone mostly unnoticed in the current kerfuffle about foreign involvement in presidential elections.

Christopher Harper is a visiting Scholar in China