Review: Peaky Blinders so far

Readability

Review: Peaky Blinders so far


By John Ruberry

Most of the main char­ac­ters in Hell on Wheels, my last Net­flix binge-​watching adven­ture, were shaped, and scarred, by the Amer­i­can Civil War.

In this BBC 2 tele­vi­sion show, Peaky Blind­ers, set in Birm­ing­ham, Eng­land begin­ning in 1919, World War I casts its shadow over the lead characters.

Three sea­sons have been released so far. The action – and the vio­lence – is cen­tered upon the Anglo-​Gypsy Shelby fam­ily, led by Thomas “Tommy” Shelby (Cil­lian Mur­phy), a dec­o­rated Great War tun­neller who returns home a new man – and a bet­ter suited one to run the fam­ily busi­ness, Shelby Broth­ers, Ltd, a book­mak­ing oper­a­tion set in the grimy and noisy Small Heath sec­tion of Birm­ing­ham. But the gang is gen­er­ally called the Peaky Blind­ers by mem­bers and their ene­mies. His old­est brother, Arthur (Paul Ander­son) is clearly more psy­cho­log­i­cally dam­aged from the war than Tommy, but he’s bet­ter suited to serve as the enforcer for the fam­ily. “I think, Arthur. That’s what I do,” Tommy explains to him. “I think. So that you don’t have to.” Third son John (Joe Cole), another World War I vet­eran, is also employed in the mus­cle side of the oper­a­tion, while Finn, the youngest Shelby, is only 11-​years-​old when the series begins.

Tommy has a sis­ter, Ada Thorne (Sophie Run­dle), who is mar­ried to com­mu­nist agi­ta­tor. But she’s still loyal to the family.

While the Shelby men were fight­ing in France – the fam­ily busi­ness was run by Eliz­a­beth “Aunt Polly” Gray (Helen McCrory), a kind of a Rosie the Riv­eter of the under­world. Tommy quickly takes over from Polly, who serves as his senior advi­sor. Like Edward G. Robinson’s leg­endary Rico char­ac­ter in Lit­tle Cae­sar, Tommy becomes a small-​time-​hood-​makes-​good-​by-​being-​bad by play­ing one gang fac­tion against the other, first in Birm­ing­ham then in Lon­don, while largely ignor­ing Aunt Polly’s warnings.

When the Peaky Blind­ers stum­ble upon a large machine gun ship­ment in an oth­er­wise rou­tine heist, that gets the atten­tion of Sec­re­tary of State for War Win­ston Churchill (Andy Nyman in the first sea­son, Richard McCabe in the sec­ond), who dis­patches Inspec­tor Chester Camp­bell (Sam Neill) from Belfast to find the machine guns. Those guns give Tommy power and respect – and ene­mies. Not only do Churchill and Camp­bell want those weapons, but so does the Irish Repub­li­can Army.

Camp­bell sends in an Irish domes­tic spy, Grace Burgess (Annabelle Wal­lis), to work at the neigh­bor­hood pub owned by Arthur, appro­pri­ately named The Gar­ri­son. She quickly becomes its de facto manager.

In sea­son three, which is set in 1924, Tommy, at Churchill’s request, gets involved in another arma­ments caper, this time with mem­bers of the Whites fac­tion who haven’t ascer­tained that the Com­mu­nists have won the Russ­ian Civil War. Arthur warns Tommy to stay out of “this Russ­ian busi­ness.” It’s too bad the script writ­ers didn’t take their own creation’s advice. As was the case with sea­son four of Sher­lock, what fol­lows is a col­lec­tion of tan­gled and con­fus­ing plot lines. Pos­si­bly real­iz­ing their mis­take, the writ­ers include quite a bit of gra­tu­itous nudity to accom­pany the Russ­ian adven­ture, includ­ing a bizarre orgy scene which does noth­ing to advance the storyline.

On the other hand, the Russ­ian diver­sion is loosely based on a 1924 scan­dal that brought down Great Britain’s first socialist-​led government.

At least two more sea­sons are coming.

The cin­e­matog­ra­phy of Peaky Blind­ers is mas­ter­ful. Imag­ine Tim Bur­ton cre­at­ing a remake of The Untouch­ables tele­vi­sion show and set­ting it in 1920s Birm­ing­ham. And this is an ugly Birm­ing­ham. J.R.R Tolkien lived in the city before the Great War and his reac­tion against it was his cre­ation of Mor­dor for The Lord of the Rings. Just as the Eye of Sauron looked upon that evil realm – the sparks and the ashes of the foundries over­see the Mid­lands metrop­o­lis here. And the indus­trial roar is always there too.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_95770” align=“alignright” width=“231”] Blog­ger in his flat cap[/caption]

With­out get­ting into spoil­ers it’s a chal­lenge to bring a descrip­tion of Jew­ish gang­ster Alfie Solomons into this review, but his por­trayal by Tom Hardy is too good to overlook.

Oh, the name. Peaky Blind­ers? There was a Birm­ing­ham gang by the same name who gained that moniker because its mem­bers sup­pos­edly sewed razor blades into the peaks of their flat caps. And in fights the hood­lums went for the eyes.

And finally, the music deserves spe­cial men­tion too. Anachro­nis­tic goth rock dom­i­nates, the unof­fi­cial theme song is Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ “Red Right Hand.” You’ll find selec­tions from PJ Har­vey, Tom Waits, and the White Stripes too.

And Johnny Cash sings “Danny Boy.”

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.


By John Ruberry

Most of the main characters in Hell on Wheels, my last Netflix binge-watching adventure, were shaped, and scarred, by the American Civil War.

In this BBC 2 television show, Peaky Blinders, set in Birmingham, England beginning in 1919, World War I casts its shadow over the lead characters.

Three seasons have been released so far. The action–and the violence–is centered upon the Anglo-Gypsy Shelby family, led by Thomas “Tommy” Shelby (Cillian Murphy), a decorated Great War tunneller who returns home a new man–and a better suited one to run the family business, Shelby Brothers, Ltd, a bookmaking operation set in the grimy and noisy Small Heath section of Birmingham. But the gang is generally called the Peaky Blinders by members and their enemies. His oldest brother, Arthur (Paul Anderson) is clearly more psychologically damaged from the war than Tommy, but he’s better suited to serve as the enforcer for the family. “I think, Arthur. That’s what I do,” Tommy explains to him. “I think. So that you don’t have to.” Third son John (Joe Cole), another World War I veteran, is also employed in the muscle side of the operation, while Finn, the youngest Shelby, is only 11-years-old when the series begins.

Tommy has a sister, Ada Thorne (Sophie Rundle), who is married to communist agitator. But she’s still loyal to the family.

While the Shelby men were fighting in France–the family business was run by Elizabeth “Aunt Polly” Gray (Helen McCrory), a kind of a Rosie the Riveter of the underworld. Tommy quickly takes over from Polly, who serves as his senior advisor. Like Edward G. Robinson’s legendary Rico character in Little Caesar, Tommy becomes a small-time-hood-makes-good-by-being-bad by playing one gang faction against the other, first in Birmingham then in London, while largely ignoring Aunt Polly’s warnings.

When the Peaky Blinders stumble upon a large machine gun shipment in an otherwise routine heist, that gets the attention of Secretary of State for War Winston Churchill (Andy Nyman in the first season, Richard McCabe in the second), who dispatches Inspector Chester Campbell (Sam Neill) from Belfast to find the machine guns. Those guns give Tommy power and respect–and enemies. Not only do Churchill and Campbell want those weapons, but so does the Irish Republican Army.

Campbell sends in an Irish domestic spy, Grace Burgess (Annabelle Wallis), to work at the neighborhood pub owned by Arthur, appropriately named The Garrison. She quickly becomes its de facto manager.

In season three, which is set in 1924, Tommy, at Churchill’s request, gets involved in another armaments caper, this time with members of the Whites faction who haven’t ascertained that the Communists have won the Russian Civil War. Arthur warns Tommy to stay out of “this Russian business.” It’s too bad the script writers didn’t take their own creation’s advice. As was the case with season four of Sherlock, what follows is a collection of tangled and confusing plot lines. Possibly realizing their mistake, the writers include quite a bit of gratuitous nudity to accompany the Russian adventure, including a bizarre orgy scene which does nothing to advance the storyline.

On the other hand, the Russian diversion is loosely based on a 1924 scandal that brought down Great Britain’s first socialist-led government.

At least two more seasons are coming.

The cinematography of Peaky Blinders is masterful. Imagine Tim Burton creating a remake of The Untouchables television show and setting it in 1920s Birmingham. And this is an ugly Birmingham. J.R.R Tolkien lived in the city before the Great War and his reaction against it was his creation of Mordor for The Lord of the Rings. Just as the Eye of Sauron looked upon that evil realm–the sparks and the ashes of the foundries oversee the Midlands metropolis here. And the industrial roar is always there too.

Blogger in his flat cap

Without getting into spoilers it’s a challenge to bring a description of Jewish gangster Alfie Solomons into this review, but his portrayal by Tom Hardy is too good to overlook.

Oh, the name. Peaky Blinders? There was a Birmingham gang by the same name who gained that moniker because its members supposedly sewed razor blades into the peaks of their flat caps. And in fights the hoodlums went for the eyes.

And finally, the music deserves special mention too. Anachronistic goth rock dominates, the unofficial theme song is Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ “Red Right Hand.” You’ll find selections from PJ Harvey, Tom Waits, and the White Stripes too.

And Johnny Cash sings “Danny Boy.”

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.