Report from Louisiana: Cajun Relief Crowd Funding Allows for Donations to Specific Flood Victims

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Report from Louisiana: Cajun Relief Crowd Funding Allows for Donations to Specific Flood Victims

By: Pat Austin

SHREVE­PORT – I wrote on this blog a cou­ple of weeks ago about the excel­lent work the Cajun Relief Foun­da­tion is doing in help­ing Louisiana’s flood vic­tims get back on their feet as the politi­cians dicker over who will over­see the $1.6 bil­lion in fed­eral relief dol­lars. As of this date, none of that relief money has been dis­bursed to flood vic­tims to help rebuild their gut­ted homes.

Cajun Relief Foun­da­tion now has their crowd-​funding site set up to where you can donate every­thing from dish tow­els to stoves to those peo­ple who are try­ing to recover after the August 2016 floods.

Con­sider the case of flood vic­tim Judy Hood:

[Judy] cur­rently rents a mobile home near her Holden Res­i­dence. Her home has been fam­ily owned since the ’60’s. Although it was dev­as­tated by 4′ of flood water, she’s grate­ful to God for the safety of her elderly parents.

Upon her return home, she dis­cov­ered that lit­tle was sal­vage­able. Among her great­est losses were Bibles, year­books, photo albums, and indus­trial art fur­ni­ture pieces designed by her broth­ers. After the flood, Judy dis­cov­ered “cot­ton balls” in which a friend quickly revealed was mold. Stay­ing in the home pro­foundly impacted her health. Judy is a can­cer patient. Unable to eat for two weeks, her health declined and she fell ill with a bac­te­r­ial infec­tion. Although her health has improved, she remains on a breath­ing machine. Her home has been gut­ted and treated for mold; how­ever, recon­struc­tion has yet to begin. Judy has $15,000 in funds to com­plete the work. Her brother is eager to help, but with­out sup­plies, he’s con­cerned, as labor costs alone would quickly deplete the funds.

There is a list of items you can donate through the site to help Judy: she needs tow­els ($25), a dryer ($300), dishes ($50) all the way up to build­ing sup­plies like sheetrock and insulation.

Another case being worked by Cajun Relief is that of Mr. Nate:

At 70 years old, dis­abled, dia­betic and blind in one eye, due to a failed cataract surgery, he just took life as it came and enjoyed being with his neigh­bors. The great flood of August 2016 was unlike any­thing he’d ever seen before and turned his once rel­a­tively easy going life, upside down.

When the August storm hit the water began to rise quickly. A friend tried to get to Nataniel by truck, but the water was start­ing to come up into the truck cab. After park­ing a dis­tance away on higher ground, Nathaniel’s friend was able to reach him and pull him to safety through waist deep water. For six months after the flood Nathaniel was dis­placed and stayed with his sis­ter. Every­thing in his home was lost.

In spite of los­ing many of his neigh­bors who were dis­placed due to the over­whelm­ing dev­as­ta­tion, Nathaniel has kept is pos­i­tive spirit. Even sur­viv­ing with no stove, no hot water, and no refrig­er­a­tor, he remains active in ser­vice to those around him.

He needs sil­ver­ware ($30), a water heater ($700), refrig­er­a­tor ($600), pots and pans ($60), etc.

There are many other cases on the Cajun Relief crowd-​funding page. If you can help any of these peo­ple rebuild their lives and make a dona­tion, by all means do so. If you can’t, just shar­ing it on your social media can help.

Go here to read about the crowd-​funding and about Cajun Relief Foun­da­tion. They’re doing the hard work of inter­view­ing and doc­u­ment­ing all of these flood vic­tims and their needs. A case­worker is assigned to each flood vic­tim and that case­worker fol­lows up on needs, talks to the per­son, ensures items get deliv­ered to that vic­tim, and serves as an advo­cate for that person’s needs.

The easy part is click­ing the donate button.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT —  I wrote on this blog a couple of weeks ago about the excellent work the Cajun Relief Foundation is doing in helping Louisiana’s flood victims get back on their feet as the politicians dicker over who will oversee the $1.6 billion in federal relief dollars.  As of this date, none of that relief money has been disbursed to flood victims to help rebuild their gutted homes.

Cajun Relief Foundation now has their crowd-funding site set up to where you can donate everything from dish towels to stoves to those people who are trying to recover after the August 2016 floods.

Consider the case of flood victim Judy Hood:

[Judy] currently rents a mobile home near her Holden Residence. Her home has been family owned since the ’60’s. Although it was devastated by 4′ of flood water, she’s grateful to God for the safety of her elderly parents.

Upon her return home, she discovered that little was salvageable. Among her greatest losses were Bibles, yearbooks, photo albums, and industrial art furniture pieces designed by her brothers. After the flood, Judy discovered “cotton balls” in which a friend quickly revealed was mold. Staying in the home profoundly impacted her health. Judy is a cancer patient. Unable to eat for two weeks, her health declined and she fell ill with a bacterial infection. Although her health has improved, she remains on a breathing machine. Her home has been gutted and treated for mold; however, reconstruction has yet to begin. Judy has $15,000 in funds to complete the work. Her brother is eager to help, but without supplies, he’s concerned, as labor costs alone would quickly deplete the funds.

There is a list of items you can donate through the site to help Judy: she needs towels ($25), a dryer ($300), dishes ($50) all the way up to building supplies like sheetrock and insulation.

Another case being worked by Cajun Relief is that of Mr. Nate:

At 70 years old, disabled, diabetic and blind in one eye, due to a failed cataract surgery, he just took life as it came and enjoyed being with his neighbors. The great flood of August 2016 was unlike anything he’d ever seen before and turned his once relatively easy going life, upside down.

When the August storm hit the water began to rise quickly. A friend tried to get to Nataniel by truck, but the water was starting to come up into the truck cab. After parking a distance away on higher ground, Nathaniel’s friend was able to reach him and pull him to safety through waist deep water. For six months after the flood Nathaniel was displaced and stayed with his sister. Everything in his home was lost.

In spite of losing many of his neighbors who were displaced due to the overwhelming devastation, Nathaniel has kept is positive spirit. Even surviving with no stove, no hot water, and no refrigerator, he remains active in service to those around him.

He needs silverware ($30), a water heater ($700), refrigerator ($600), pots and pans ($60), etc.

There are many other cases on the Cajun Relief crowd-funding page.  If you can help any of these people rebuild their lives and make a donation, by all means do so. If you can’t, just sharing it on your social media can help.

Go here to read about the crowd-funding and about Cajun Relief Foundation. They’re doing the hard work of interviewing and documenting all of these flood victims and their needs.  A caseworker is assigned to each flood victim and that caseworker follows up on needs, talks to the person, ensures items get delivered to that victim, and serves as an advocate for that person’s needs.

The easy part is clicking the donate button.

 

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.