by baldilocks

In the last few days, it has been reported that the government of the Chechen Republic (Chechnya) is putting homosexuals in “concentration” camps.

“Concentration camps” for LGBT people have been allegedly opened up in Chechnya where men have been tortured and killed because of their sexuality, Novaya Gazeta reported. The allegations came after a few eyewitnesses and survivors said in interviews with the Russian publication that they were arrested and detained at one of the secret prisons in Argun, a town in the Chechen Republic, Russia.

Around 100 gay men have been reportedly detained and at least three killed in the past week in Chechnya by the police. The “concentration camps” are being used to force homosexuals to commit that they would leave the republic, according to Novaya Gazeta.

The officials in Chechnya started torturing the homosexuals after a Russia-based NGO for LGBT rights — GayRussia.ru — applied for a gay rights march in the capital of Grozny [the Chechen capital], reports said.

Meanwhile, Chechen’s President Ramzan Kadyrov, who is a key ally [sic] of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has been accused of setting up the camps to torture gay people. He has denied the allegation saying, “It’s impossible to persecute those who are not in the republic.” The Chechen government suggested there are no gay people in their country.

And this is the key phrase in the report:

The Muslim-majority nation of Chechnya falls under Russian federal powers and follows traditional Muslim values.

A few pertinent facts:

  • Chechnya is 95% Muslim and is, basically, owned by Russia. The two entities have a bloody history that goes back centuries.
  • Muslims non-pitchers have been persecuting homosexuals for who knows how long.
  • Remember Beslan?

In the past couple of days, I’ve seen people act all surprised about this report and even wonder why President Trump doesn’t do something about it. Really? Perhaps they think that he should lob a few Tomahawks on what is, essentially, Russian soil. Yeah, that will fix everything.

Please, people. Is it too tough to do the barest bit of homework before you virtue signal?

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done on April 2017! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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Kassem Eid survived the 2013 sarin massacre in Syria in which 1,400 people died, so it wasn’t surprising that CNN contacted him to talk about the most recent attack and the Trump administration’s response.

What happened next stunned CNN anchor Brooke Baldwin.

“For the very first time, we see Assad held accountable just for once, held accountable for his crimes against humanity. I was overwhelmed. I felt grateful for President Trump. I felt grateful for the United States. I felt grateful for each and every person who lobbied and kept on talking until someone actually listened,” Eid said.

In an apparent attempt to keep the Syrian survivor on the media talking points about refugees, Baldwin played a video of Hillary Clinton bashing Trump over his immigration plan.

Eid didn’t take the bait.

“Help us stay in our country, and if you just give me a few seconds just to tell President Trump once again, please, sir, what you did was amazing, what you did was powerful message of hope for a lot of people inside and outside of Syria,” he told a dumbstruck Baldwin.

He criticized those who demonstrated against the immigration policies but failed to protest against the sarin attacks in 2013 and now. “I didn’t see you raising your voice against President Obama’s inaction in Syria that led us refugees, that made us refugees get kicked out of Syria. If you really care about refugees, if you really care about helping us, please, help us STAY in our — in our country. We don’t want to come to [the] United States. We want to STAY in our country.”

It’s unlikely that Eid will be asked again for his comments on CNN anytime soon, but his message should be shared and shared again.

Here is his interview on CNN:

As a reporter, I covered Syria for many years. What has occurred over the past six years is one of the worst examples of genocide in history. Although Assad and the self-proclaimed Islamic State bear most of the responsibility for what has happened, the Obama administration’s lack of any coherent strategy except to make idle threats allowed these forces of evil to devastate the country. The Trump administration does not have to commit itself to full-scale involvement in Syria, but the decision to launch missiles gave aid and comfort to Eid and many like him.

Here are some of my most recent columns about Syria:

The media and Syria: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/sep/11/harper-in-syria-war-debate-media-are-missing-in-ac/

The role Hezbollah in Syria: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/jun/19/harper-media-overlook-key-player-in-middle-east-cr/

Bashar Assad and 60 Minutes’ dreadful interview: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/apr/1/christopher-harper-60-minutes-bashar-assad-intervi/

I suspect they won’t show much remorse until the end of the lawsuit:

If every other egregious example of a male student denied due process after being accused of sexual misconduct gets ignored – this one should not be.

A male student who was accused of sexual harassment committed suicide just days after the University of Texas at Arlington ignored its own policies in order to punish him.  The accused student’s father, a lawyer acting as the administrator of his son’s estate, is now suing the school for violating his son’s Title IX rights.

Frankly given that people involved in bullying have been held criminally responsible in the past  I’d like to see these members of the Campus Gestapo held to that same level of criminal responsibility in this student’s death.

This kind of thing is going to continue until the price of it is too high for those making false accusations or for the schools that are throwing due process out the window.

Exit question, how long before we hear members of the left say the dead student got what he deserved?