Mexico gets ready to blame Putin

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Mexico gets ready to blame Putin

Mex­ico has blamed the United States for every­thing since before the “Last Spike” went into the ground. It con­tin­ues to do so to this day.

Just this week, Mexico’s fore­most liv­ing his­to­rian Enrique Krauze posited in the New York Times that the U.S. has three orig­i­nal sins: Slav­ery, racism, and “the aggres­sion against Mex­ico and the plun­der­ing of its ter­ri­tory.” Because of that, Krauze says, all Mex­i­cans should be free to live in the U.S., with­out restrictions.

Pop­u­lar cul­ture sup­ports this blame game. The Net­flix series Ingob­ern­able (Ungovern­able) has the CIA kill the pres­i­dent of Mex­ico when he was about to declare the end of the “war on drugs” after blam­ing the U.S. for every Mex­i­can death it caused. Ingob­ern­able (star­ring real-​life drug lord El Chapo’s friend Kate del Castillo) ought to be named Unwatchable.

The country’s for­eign pol­icy reflects its blame game: The Diplo­mad writes from experience,

I also have long con­sid­ered Mex­ico a major threat to Amer­ica. I have dealt with Mex­i­can diplo­mats at the UN, the OAS, and in Cen­tral and South Amer­ica. They are first rate. They are patri­otic, well-​trained, ded­i­cated, and hard work­ing. They, almost to a man and a woman, are also pos­sessed with a deep, deep ani­mus towards the United States. At the UN and the OAS, for exam­ple, Mex­ico, in my expe­ri­ence, played the role of oppo­nent to what­ever we sought to do. They not only con­sis­tently voted against us, they col­lab­o­rated with our oppo­nents on res­o­lu­tions and projects anti­thet­i­cal to our inter­ests, and, for exam­ple, refused to oppose Cuban and Venezue­lan human rights vio­la­tions. They rarely passed on an oppor­tu­nity to stick it in our eye.

Mex­ico had a major role in fos­ter­ing guer­rilla groups in Cen­tral Amer­ica dur­ing the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, back­ing off only when it became a hin­drance to the NAFTA deal with the United States, and when some of the groups began oper­at­ing in Mexico.

It is with some amuse­ment, then, that I find this in my news­feed: Fears grow that Rus­sia could med­dle in Mex­i­can elec­tion (empha­sis added)

If [Rus­sia] inter­vened in the United States, there’s every rea­son to think that Mex­ico is a tar­get for attack,” said [Sen. Armando] Ríos Piter [of the center-​left Party of the Demo­c­ra­tic Rev­o­lu­tion (PRD)], who recently launched an inde­pen­dent pres­i­den­tial bid.

Ríos Piter said Mex­ico is a nat­ural tar­get for Rus­sia, as the coun­try is expected to become a top-​five econ­omy over the next half century.

Mex­ico may well become a top-​five econ­omy, yet Ríos Piter con­ve­niently for­gets that remit­tances from the U.S. gen­er­ate more than Mexico’s oil or tourism indus­tries. No blame there.

Call me a cynic, but to my jaun­diced eye, Ríos Piter may be lay­ing the ground­work for his third-​ranked party los­ing the pres­i­dency again — after all, some still refer to their can­di­date who lost the 1997 elec­tion as the “legit­i­mate pres­i­dent of Mexico.”

The fact remains, as Tara McCor­mack said,

this revamped Red Scare speaks to a pro­found and seri­ously anti-​democratic shift among dis­ori­ented, strug­gling elites.

In Mex­ico as in else­where, to use McCrmack’s words, “The Rus­sia blame game is really an abdi­ca­tion of polit­i­cal respon­si­bil­ity,” and Mex­ico has been play­ing blame games for a very long time.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog.

Mexico has blamed the United States for everything since before the “Last Spike” went into the ground. It continues to do so to this day.

Just this week, Mexico’s foremost living historian Enrique Krauze posited in the New York Times that the U.S. has three original sins: Slavery, racism, and “the aggression against Mexico and the plundering of its territory.” Because of that, Krauze says, all Mexicans should be free to live in the U.S., without restrictions.

Popular culture supports this blame game. The Netflix series Ingobernable (Ungovernable) has the CIA kill the president of Mexico when he was about to declare the end of the “war on drugs” after blaming the U.S. for every Mexican death it caused. Ingobernable (starring real-life drug lord El Chapo’s friend Kate del Castillo) ought to be named Unwatchable.

The country’s foreign policy reflects its blame game: The Diplomad writes from experience,

I also have long considered Mexico a major threat to America. I have dealt with Mexican diplomats at the UN, the OAS, and in Central and South America. They are first rate. They are patriotic, well-trained, dedicated, and hard working. They, almost to a man and a woman, are also possessed with a deep, deep animus towards the United States. At the UN and the OAS, for example, Mexico, in my experience, played the role of opponent to whatever we sought to do. They not only consistently voted against us, they collaborated with our opponents on resolutions and projects antithetical to our interests, and, for example, refused to oppose Cuban and Venezuelan human rights violations. They rarely passed on an opportunity to stick it in our eye.

Mexico had a major role in fostering guerrilla groups in Central America during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, backing off only when it became a hindrance to the NAFTA deal with the United States, and when some of the groups began operating in Mexico.

It is with some amusement, then, that I find this in my newsfeed: Fears grow that Russia could meddle in Mexican election (emphasis added)

“If [Russia] intervened in the United States, there’s every reason to think that Mexico is a target for attack,” said [Sen. Armando] Ríos Piter [of the center-left Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD)], who recently launched an independent presidential bid.
. . .
Ríos Piter said Mexico is a natural target for Russia, as the country is expected to become a top-five economy over the next half century.

Mexico may well become a top-five economy, yet Ríos Piter conveniently forgets that remittances from the U.S. generate more than Mexico’s oil or tourism industries. No blame there.

Call me a cynic, but to my jaundiced eye, Ríos Piter may be laying the groundwork for his third-ranked party losing the presidency again – after all, some still refer to their candidate who lost the 1997 election as the “legitimate president of Mexico.”

The fact remains, as Tara McCormack said,

this revamped Red Scare speaks to a profound and seriously anti-democratic shift among disoriented, struggling elites.

In Mexico as in elsewhere, to use McCrmack’s words, “The Russia blame game is really an abdication of political responsibility,” and Mexico has been playing blame games for a very long time.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog.