Readability

Sad news about the living

I came across this on Meme­o­ran­dum,
She wanted her ex-​husband to die with a happy thought; she told him Trump had been impeached

When Michael Elliott died, the last voice he heard was that of his ex-​wife, his best friend.

In a short phone con­ver­sa­tion moments before Elliott took his last breath, she told him what he wanted to hear.

I told him that everything’s going to be all right,” Teresa Elliott told The Wash­ing­ton Post. “And Don­ald Trump has been impeached.”

What sad­dens me about this item is not that some­one lied to a per­son in the last moments of his life, or the polit­i­cal nature of the story.

I know exiles who told a dying rel­a­tive good news about their coun­try, and the news were totally invented. The per­son on their deathbed had suf­fered hor­ri­bly in their native coun­try at the hands of a cruel dic­ta­tor­ship which for decades denied them their most basic rights, unlike Mr. Elliott, who report­edly col­lected Porches and founded a golf club in Oregon.

God knows what we would say while try­ing to ease a loved one’s last moments.

What sad­dens me is that this is news.

Back in the olden days there was a word of Latin ori­gin peo­ple used: Deco­rum. There were notions of what was con­sid­ered proper or improper behav­ior: If you demeaned your­self by lying to the dying in what would be regarded as a most pri­vate moment, you cer­tainly didn’t brag about it, much less in public.

Nowa­days those old notions have been pushed away in favor of polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness and scor­ing polit­i­cal points.

After lying to the deceased, appar­ently the liar picked up the phone and alerted the media, which brings to mind this John Giel­gud scene from Arthur (lan­guage NSFW)

In this age of social media and “real­ity” TV, los­ing our notions of what belongs in the pub­lic domain is more than just a char­ac­ter flaw. It is a self-​inflicted wound on our right to privacy.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog.

I came across this on Memeorandum,
She wanted her ex-husband to die with a happy thought; she told him Trump had been impeached

When Michael Elliott died, the last voice he heard was that of his ex-wife, his best friend.

In a short phone conversation moments before Elliott took his last breath, she told him what he wanted to hear.

“I told him that everything’s going to be all right,” Teresa Elliott told The Washington Post. “And Donald Trump has been impeached.”

What saddens me about this item is not that someone lied to a person in the last moments of his life, or the political nature of the story.

I know exiles who told a dying relative good news about their country, and the news were totally invented. The person on their deathbed had suffered horribly in their native country at the hands of a cruel dictatorship which for decades denied them their most basic rights, unlike Mr. Elliott, who reportedly collected Porches and founded a golf club in Oregon.

God knows what we would say while trying to ease a loved one’s last moments.

What saddens me is that this is news.

Back in the olden days there was a word of Latin origin people used: Decorum. There were notions of what was considered proper or improper behavior: If you demeaned yourself by lying to the dying in what would be regarded as a most private moment, you certainly didn’t brag about it, much less in public.

Nowadays those old notions have been pushed away in favor of political correctness and scoring political points.

After lying to the deceased, apparently the liar picked up the phone and alerted the media, which brings to mind this John Gielgud scene from Arthur (language NSFW)

In this age of social media and “reality” TV, losing our notions of what belongs in the public domain is more than just a character flaw. It is a self-inflicted wound on our right to privacy.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog.