Will an amended AHCA be any better

Will an amended AHCA be any better?

Readability

Will an amended AHCA be any better?

I don’t make it a prac­tice to com­ment on poten­tial leg­is­la­tion before read­ing it. Spec­u­la­tion takes too much bias and rumors into account which tends to sway the reader (and author) in direc­tions before the truth is even known. I’m mak­ing this excep­tion because if reports that Vice Pres­i­dent Mike Pence has nego­ti­ated a deal with the Free­dom Cau­cus turn out to be true, it could be the best move made by the admin­is­tra­tion on health care since tak­ing office.

Then again, it might be a big nothingburger.

The good news: lim­ited waivers for the states. This means states have oppor­tu­ni­ties to bypass cer­tain pro­vi­sions of the AHCA that would allow them to help drive down premiums.

The bad news: essen­tial health ben­e­fits carry over from Oba­macare. This will limit the decrease (and even per­pet­u­ate increases) in pre­mi­ums for the vast major­ity of Americans.

We’ll see how it pans out, but here’s the thing. I know many if not most Repub­li­cans are in favor of repeal­ing and replac­ing Oba­macare with the AHCA. It would boost morale and take away cer­tain chunks of the oppres­sive eco­nomic bur­den that Oba­macare has placed on us. How­ever, the details are ter­ri­fy­ing to any­one who believes in lim­it­ing gov­ern­ment and defend­ing the free­doms we hold dear. The orig­i­nal AHCA was a repack­aged ver­sion of nation­al­ized med­i­cine that would push us fur­ther down the road towards finan­cial obliv­ion and what we’ve seen of the pro­posed changes don’t change that. It would poten­tially slow down sky­rock­et­ing insur­ance costs, but it wouldn’t reverse them. In essence, it’s not a solu­tion to Oba­macare but a way to spread out the ill effects. We will still be pay­ing way more than we were just a few years ago. We will still be bal­loon­ing the national debt and mak­ing lit­tle impact on our out­ra­geously unbal­anced budget.

Full repeal is the right way to go. That’s not to say that we need to return to the pre-​Obamacare era. Changes need to be made, but those changes should come based upon reac­tions and analy­sis once it’s repealed rather than try­ing to plug all of the poten­tial holes ahead of time. If we repeal Oba­macare and allow the free mar­ket to guide the gov­ern­ment on changes to be made, the end result will be much bet­ter. We can already plan for some of the changes such as open­ing up com­pe­ti­tion across state lines. We can work with char­i­ties, com­mu­ni­ties, and local gov­ern­ments to fill the gaps and pre­vent peo­ple from falling through the cracks. By repeal­ing Oba­macare fully in stages over the next 13 years and then watch­ing how con­sumers, health insur­ance com­pa­nies, and mar­kets react, we can make intel­li­gent deci­sions rather than spec­u­la­tive ones.

Of note is that the Free­dom Cau­cus is sup­port­ing the amend­ments to the bill. We’ll see what that really looks like. Get­ting gov­ern­ment out of health care is the only truly conservative/​federalist way of fix­ing it. If they’re will­ing to nego­ti­ate, I would hope it’s because they believe in the plan and not because they’re feel­ing pres­sure from donors and the White House.

Only time will tell and spec­u­la­tion at this point is pre­ma­ture, but it will be inter­est­ing to see just how revamped Ryan­care 2.0 really is. The bright spot I’ve seen in ini­tial reports is that left­ist pub­li­ca­tions like WaPo and HuffPo seem to hate the idea, so that’s good.

I don’t make it a practice to comment on potential legislation before reading it. Speculation takes too much bias and rumors into account which tends to sway the reader (and author) in directions before the truth is even known. I’m making this exception because if reports that Vice President Mike Pence has negotiated a deal with the Freedom Caucus turn out to be true, it could be the best move made by the administration on health care since taking office.

Then again, it might be a big nothingburger.

The good news: limited waivers for the states. This means states have opportunities to bypass certain provisions of the AHCA that would allow them to help drive down premiums.

The bad news: essential health benefits carry over from Obamacare. This will limit the decrease (and even perpetuate increases) in premiums for the vast majority of Americans.

We’ll see how it pans out, but here’s the thing. I know many if not most Republicans are in favor of repealing and replacing Obamacare with the AHCA. It would boost morale and take away certain chunks of the oppressive economic burden that Obamacare has placed on us. However, the details are terrifying to anyone who believes in limiting government and defending the freedoms we hold dear. The original AHCA was a repackaged version of nationalized medicine that would push us further down the road towards financial oblivion and what we’ve seen of the proposed changes don’t change that. It would potentially slow down skyrocketing insurance costs, but it wouldn’t reverse them. In essence, it’s not a solution to Obamacare but a way to spread out the ill effects. We will still be paying way more than we were just a few years ago. We will still be ballooning the national debt and making little impact on our outrageously unbalanced budget.

Full repeal is the right way to go. That’s not to say that we need to return to the pre-Obamacare era. Changes need to be made, but those changes should come based upon reactions and analysis once it’s repealed rather than trying to plug all of the potential holes ahead of time. If we repeal Obamacare and allow the free market to guide the government on changes to be made, the end result will be much better. We can already plan for some of the changes such as opening up competition across state lines. We can work with charities, communities, and local governments to fill the gaps and prevent people from falling through the cracks. By repealing Obamacare fully in stages over the next 1-3 years and then watching how consumers, health insurance companies, and markets react, we can make intelligent decisions rather than speculative ones.

Of note is that the Freedom Caucus is supporting the amendments to the bill. We’ll see what that really looks like. Getting government out of health care is the only truly conservative/federalist way of fixing it. If they’re willing to negotiate, I would hope it’s because they believe in the plan and not because they’re feeling pressure from donors and the White House.

Only time will tell and speculation at this point is premature, but it will be interesting to see just how revamped Ryancare 2.0 really is. The bright spot I’ve seen in initial reports is that leftist publications like WaPo and HuffPo seem to hate the idea, so that’s good.