Four years ago today, a jury was deliberating the fate of Kermit Gosnell. That trial ended with Gosnell serving life in prison for murder and manslaughter.

Today, a GOP-majority Congress, with a GOP president looking on, can’t agree on when or how to prevent taxpayer funds from going to abortion providers.

What does the spine-snipping abortionist have to do with abortion funding? Only this: a member of Congress who remembers Gosnell’s crimes with disgust is unlikely to support sending tax dollars to an abortion industry that fights regulation.  Conversely, a member of Congress who supports tax funding of abortion providers, or who is indifferent to that funding, is someone who has forgotten or ignored the crimes of Kermit Gosnell and his many enablers.

While the Gosnell trial was going on in Pennsylvania, abortion-related legislation was being considered in my own state. I remember a representative of NARAL dismissing Gosnell as an “outlier.” There was no need to tighten up  abortion regulation, said the lobbyist, since there were no Gosnells in our fair state (she said). Representatives of local abortion providers echoed the “outlier” line.

To this day, my state has no limit on when abortions may be performed or who may perform them. There’s no law requiring treatment of infants who survive attempted abortion. There’s no requirement for abortion facilities to meet the same standards as ambulatory surgical facilities. There’s no collection of abortion statistics, including statistics on maternal morbidity and mortality, and therefore no way to spot an abortion provider who injures women the way Gosnell did.

Every attempt to pass laws to prevent future Gosnells has been resisted by lobbyists for the abortion industry. And still, there are elected officials belonging to a nominally pro-life party who can’t quite figure out how to keep that industry from picking my pocket. I don’t let state officials off the hook, either; they’re the ones who award state contracts to abortion providers.

I hear the nervous whispers from officeholders who buy the 3% lie: but these agencies do so much good…

Spare me. An agency that lobbies against laws to protect women’s health and safeguard children who survive attempted abortion is not “doing good.”

I understand the nature of budgets and the need for consensus and prudence. This anniversary, though, this reminder of Gosnell, renders me impatient to see an end to public funding of abortion providers.

(While I’m mentioning Gosnell, allow me to recommend the recent book Gosnell: the Untold Story of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer by Ann McElhinney & Phelim McAleer. It’s not just about Kermit Gosnell. The authors make sure that the people who helped bring him to justice get their due.)

Ellen Kolb writes at EllenKolb.com and blogs about life issues in New Hampshire at Leaven for the Loaf.
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A friend’s Facebook feed turned up this book:
Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps, and the blurb tells you who the target audience is,

If you graduated from college but still feel like a student . . . if you wear a business suit to job interviews but pajamas to the grocery store . . . if you have your own apartment but no idea how to cook or clean . . . it’s OK. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

Let me stand by my front door and get this off my chest: “Take one step and GET OFF MY LAWN.”

This is the sort of thing that gives millennials a bad name. No. It is not “OK” to inflict your pajamas on the unsuspecting public at the grocery store or anywhere other than a. your home or b. the hospital.

Instead of 468 steps (five more steps than it takes to clamber up to the top of Florence’s Duomo, and that’s a climb), I propose twelve steps (I’m assuming you are gainfully employed in some form):

1. Live within your means.
2. Clean after yourself.
3. Make your bed.
4. Wash, fold/iron, sort, and put away your laundry at least once a week.
5. Pay your bills on time.
6. Keep yourself clean and well-groomed.
7. Stop complaining.
8. Practice daily saying “hello, please, thank you, may I.”
9. Listen before you answer.
10. Be punctual.
11. Learn to fix yourself three simple meals – breakfast, lunch and dinner keeping this in mind: one starch, one protein, one or two veggies.
12. Learn from your mistakes.

Give yourself extra credit if you learn how to parallel park.

It’s twelve steps, not 468. They are in random order, since these are steps you take every day.

No, I have never taken part in the AA twelve step programs, but a dozen steps certainly are catchier than 468, especially on a post-it note.

As you can see, there are three categories: Personal cleanliness and maintenance, financial, and interpersonal skills. Learning from your mistakes applies to all three.

Some steps are easier than others: Making your bed every day, for instance. That doesn’t mean they are not important. Indeed, Admiral William H. McRaven (U.S. Navy Retired) has a best-selling book based on his speech, Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World that begins by explaining why it is important to start your day with a task – i.e., making your bed – completed. Admiral McRaven learned that as part of his Navy Seals training. Socio-economist Randall Bell found that multi-millionaires make their beds, too.

That is what “adulting” is really about: Getting up every day and completing the tasks that bring meaning to our lives without neglecting the necessary daily chores that maintain us healthy (physically, mentally and financially) and grounded.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog.

…is an important fact concerning the 2nd world war.

If you watch this video he mentions that the left considered the 2nd world war the “last good war”

but he fails to mention that once Hitler made his pact with the Soviets suddenly the Seegers, Chaplains of the left became completely anti war…until of course he invaded the Soviets and then they became the most strident voices for going over there. As I wrote at the time of his death:

Pete Seeger song on involvement in WW 2 before the Nazi’s attacked the USSR:

Franklin D, listen to me,
You ain’t a-gonna send me ‘cross the sea.
You may say it’s for defense
That kinda talk ain’t got no sense.

Pete Seeger song after Hitler invaded the USSR

Now, Mr. President
You’re commander-in-chief of our armed forces
The ships and the planes and the tanks and the horses
I guess you know best just where I can fight …
So what I want is you to give me a gun
So we can hurry up and get the job done!

Coincidence I’m sure.

It’s why a Newspaper is Missouri home of the late Michael Brown feels fine with ditching Stacy Washington a Black Woman from their paper, Black live and opinions may matter but not if they are heretical to the church of the left.

Every time the left’s double standard on Nazi’s vs Communism comes up, this fact should be shouted loudly