Readability

Adulting: Make your bed

A friend’s Face­book feed turned up this book:
Adult­ing: How to Become a Grown-​up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps, and the blurb tells you who the tar­get audi­ence is,

If you grad­u­ated from col­lege but still feel like a stu­dent … if you wear a busi­ness suit to job inter­views but paja­mas to the gro­cery store … if you have your own apart­ment but no idea how to cook or clean … it’s OK. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

Let me stand by my front door and get this off my chest: “Take one step and GET OFF MY LAWN.”

This is the sort of thing that gives mil­len­ni­als a bad name. No. It is not “OK” to inflict your paja­mas on the unsus­pect­ing pub­lic at the gro­cery store or any­where other than a. your home or b. the hospital.

Instead of 468 steps (five more steps than it takes to clam­ber up to the top of Florence’s Duomo, and that’s a climb), I pro­pose twelve steps (I’m assum­ing you are gain­fully employed in some form):

1. Live within your means.
2. Clean after your­self.
3. Make your bed.
4. Wash, fold/​iron, sort, and put away your laun­dry at least once a week.
5. Pay your bills on time.
6. Keep your­self clean and well-​groomed.
7. Stop com­plain­ing.
8. Prac­tice daily say­ing “hello, please, thank you, may I.“
9. Lis­ten before you answer.
10. Be punc­tual.
11. Learn to fix your­self three sim­ple meals — break­fast, lunch and din­ner keep­ing this in mind: one starch, one pro­tein, one or two veg­gies.
12. Learn from your mistakes.

Give your­self extra credit if you learn how to par­al­lel park.

It’s twelve steps, not 468. They are in ran­dom order, since these are steps you take every day.

No, I have never taken part in the AA twelve step pro­grams, but a dozen steps cer­tainly are catch­ier than 468, espe­cially on a post-​it note.

As you can see, there are three cat­e­gories: Per­sonal clean­li­ness and main­te­nance, finan­cial, and inter­per­sonal skills. Learn­ing from your mis­takes applies to all three.

Some steps are eas­ier than oth­ers: Mak­ing your bed every day, for instance. That doesn’t mean they are not impor­tant. Indeed, Admi­ral William H. McRaven (U.S. Navy Retired) has a best-​selling book based on his speech, Make Your Bed: Lit­tle Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World that begins by explain­ing why it is impor­tant to start your day with a task — i.e., mak­ing your bed — com­pleted. Admi­ral McRaven learned that as part of his Navy Seals train­ing. Socio-​economist Ran­dall Bell found that multi-​millionaires make their beds, too.

That is what “adult­ing” is really about: Get­ting up every day and com­plet­ing the tasks that bring mean­ing to our lives with­out neglect­ing the nec­es­sary daily chores that main­tain us healthy (phys­i­cally, men­tally and finan­cially) and grounded.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog.

A friend’s Facebook feed turned up this book:
Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps, and the blurb tells you who the target audience is,

If you graduated from college but still feel like a student . . . if you wear a business suit to job interviews but pajamas to the grocery store . . . if you have your own apartment but no idea how to cook or clean . . . it’s OK. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

Let me stand by my front door and get this off my chest: “Take one step and GET OFF MY LAWN.”

This is the sort of thing that gives millennials a bad name. No. It is not “OK” to inflict your pajamas on the unsuspecting public at the grocery store or anywhere other than a. your home or b. the hospital.

Instead of 468 steps (five more steps than it takes to clamber up to the top of Florence’s Duomo, and that’s a climb), I propose twelve steps (I’m assuming you are gainfully employed in some form):

1. Live within your means.
2. Clean after yourself.
3. Make your bed.
4. Wash, fold/iron, sort, and put away your laundry at least once a week.
5. Pay your bills on time.
6. Keep yourself clean and well-groomed.
7. Stop complaining.
8. Practice daily saying “hello, please, thank you, may I.”
9. Listen before you answer.
10. Be punctual.
11. Learn to fix yourself three simple meals – breakfast, lunch and dinner keeping this in mind: one starch, one protein, one or two veggies.
12. Learn from your mistakes.

Give yourself extra credit if you learn how to parallel park.

It’s twelve steps, not 468. They are in random order, since these are steps you take every day.

No, I have never taken part in the AA twelve step programs, but a dozen steps certainly are catchier than 468, especially on a post-it note.

As you can see, there are three categories: Personal cleanliness and maintenance, financial, and interpersonal skills. Learning from your mistakes applies to all three.

Some steps are easier than others: Making your bed every day, for instance. That doesn’t mean they are not important. Indeed, Admiral William H. McRaven (U.S. Navy Retired) has a best-selling book based on his speech, Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World that begins by explaining why it is important to start your day with a task – i.e., making your bed – completed. Admiral McRaven learned that as part of his Navy Seals training. Socio-economist Randall Bell found that multi-millionaires make their beds, too.

That is what “adulting” is really about: Getting up every day and completing the tasks that bring meaning to our lives without neglecting the necessary daily chores that maintain us healthy (physically, mentally and financially) and grounded.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog.