by baldilocks

The 50th anniversary of Loving vs. Virginia is coming up. Yes, the link is from the New York Times, but it’s worth a read.

Monday will be 50 years since the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling in Loving vs. Virginia, the landmark case that wiped laws banning interracial marriage off the books in Virginia and 15 other states. Thus did Mildred Loving, both black and Native American, and her husband, Richard, who was white, make civil rights history. (…)

The Lovings were arrested in July 1958, when the local sheriff burst into their bedroom in the middle of the night, demanding to know what they were doing together. They had married in the District of Columbia, but their union was illegal in Virginia. A county judge offered a deal: They could avoid prison if they promised to leave Virginia and not return for 25 years.

They moved to Washington, but a longing for home upended the agreement. Mildred, missing her family, wrote a letter to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. He referred the matter to the American Civil Liberties Union, which challenged the constitutionality of Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law. Yet the Lovings — Richard died in 1975, and Mildred in 2008 — were reluctant civil rights icons.

“It was thrown in my lap,” Mrs. Loving told a Times reporter in 1992. “What choice did I have?”

Indeed. Love is what it is. Hard to imagine going to prison for such a thing, but I’m glad I was born when I was born.

If I knew who did this, I’d cite it. Such brilliance should be credited.

My own family is multiracial, multiethnic, and multinational. It’s difficult to imagine having it any other way. Of course, America has always been all those things, but now, of course, we’re far less hypocritical about it.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

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The sand dunes along the Silk Road

Dunhuang, China, is probably the most important city you’ve never heard of.

Tucked into a corner of Northwest China, Dunhuang [pronounced DONE-hwong] was a major outpost on the famous Silk Road trading route and has become a symbol of the current government’s attempt to rebuild the image and the use of the international connection.

Marco Polo traveled through Dunhuang in the 13th century and spent 17 years as an aide to Kublai Khan, the Mongol leader of the Yuan Dynasty in China and conquered an area from Asia to Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries.

But Dunhuang played a major role in building China’s role in the world long before that.

Buddhist monks arrived in China from India by the first century AD, and a sizable Buddhist community eventually developed in Dunhuang.

The caves carved out by the monks, originally used for meditation, developed into a place of worship and pilgrimage called the Mogao Caves.

One of the Mogao Caves near Dunhuang, China

During a recent trip to Dunhuang, I had the opportunity to see the caves. I actually went back for a second look because they are simply incredible! You only get to see eight to 10 of the more than 700 caves, but they are a breath-taking example of Buddhist art from 400 to 1200 A.D. The caves also kept a secret of thousands of hidden documents about culture and religion through the world—only discovered in the early 1900s when a monk found them hidden behind a wall. A number of Christian and Jewish artifacts have been discovered in the caves, including a Bible from Syria.For more information, see http://en.people.cn/english/200006/20/eng20000620_43468.html

From Dunhuang, you also get a sense of the extraordinary effort and will of the people, like Marco Polo, who traveled through the deserts of the world. The nearby Gobi Desert is the third largest in the world behind the Sahara and Arabian deserts. The Taklamakan Desert, which also sits nearby Dunhuang, is the 16th-largest in the world and is almost the size of Germany and exists almost entirely of sand dunes.

Today, the central government of China is trying to make Dunhuang a major tourist attraction, particularly the Mogao Caves. I hope the leadership succeeds in the effort because the caves are one of the most beautiful sites I’ve ever seen.

Lt. Tom Keefer: Can’t you see what he’s doing? He’s re-enacting his big triumph, the cheese investigation. He wants to be as hot as the young Ensign Queeg.

The Caine Mutiny 1954

Norma Desmond:  All right,Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my closeup.”

Sunset Boulavard 1950

One of the advantages of age is perspective of having gone through things and having the experience of living through events. It’s even better when you study history is you get the perspective of people who have been dead for years, decades or even centuries because in the end, there really is nothing new under the sun.

That’s one of the reasons why the offensive against President Trump doesn’t surprise me, anyone who lived through that era would know the media had the same hatred and contempt for Ronald Reagan. I remember being in college and having my own history professor speak of his fears of Ronald Reagan. The main difference being in those days being that there was no conservative media to push back.  That’s why if you think that the disaster of the Comey hearing for the left would have humbled them, you’d think wrong as Byron York explains:

Fired FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee marked the full shift of the Trump-Russia investigation from a probe dedicated to discovering collusion to a probe dedicated to proving the president obstructed justice. (See “At this rate, it won’t matter if Trump colluded with Russia.”) Democrats at the Comey hearing barely touched on collusion, which appears to have turned out to be a dry hole. When it did come up in Comey’s appearance, it was during questioning from Republicans, who wanted to highlight their point that collusion — the core of the case and the reason everybody got so excited in the first place — has so far turned out to be nothing.

 

To Democrats, that no longer matters. Now, it’s all about obstruction of justice, or alleged obstruction of justice, or fantasized obstruction of justice, depending on your partisan perspective. Senate Democrats focused almost exclusively on obstruction in their questioning of Comey, and their House counterparts are sure to do the same. As far as the Justice Department investigation of the president is concerned, we know that as of the time Comey was fired on May 9, there was no investigation of the president concerning collusion, which strongly suggests that after 10 months of probing, authorities had nothing against him on that issue. Now, however, after the Comey memos and the Comey firing, it seems safe to predict that special counsel Robert Mueller will investigate Trump for obstruction. So it is a new game, even if Republicans keep trying to play the old one.

When I see the Democrats and their media allies going all Watergate on Trump that I see get what’s goign on.  I know and perhaps they know there is no there there, but it’s not about that,  to some degree it isnt’ even about power.

It’s about glory days., those wonderful days of yesteryear when the Democrats and the media were at their apex of respect and presteege in the eyes of the public, a press that spoke with only one liberal voice supporting a Democrat party that in congress was  practically unchallenged.

Unfortunately for the left the lessons of Watergate don’t apply mainly due the admidded lack of evidence of any crime, which is not a big surprise as there is also the lack of an actual crime to have evidence of unless of course you’re counting, as Don Surber puts it :  “James Comey’s multiple ethics and likely legal violations.”

But all that doesn’t matter, to paraphrase River Song, the Democrats/Media will believe any story that they are the hero of and no matter what the reality, in their minds, they are the heros, as brave or braver than those who marched in Selma or fought in the getto of Warsaw.

After all they don’t call themsevles the resistance for nothing.