Readability

The Bad Not-So-Old Days

by baldilocks

The 50th anniver­sary of Lov­ing vs. Vir­ginia is com­ing up. Yes, the link is from the New York Times, but it’s worth a read.

Mon­day will be 50 years since the Supreme Court’s unan­i­mous rul­ing in Lov­ing vs. Vir­ginia, the land­mark case that wiped laws ban­ning inter­ra­cial mar­riage off the books in Vir­ginia and 15 other states. Thus did Mil­dred Lov­ing, both black and Native Amer­i­can, and her hus­band, Richard, who was white, make civil rights history. (…)

The Lov­ings were arrested in July 1958, when the local sher­iff burst into their bed­room in the mid­dle of the night, demand­ing to know what they were doing together. They had mar­ried in the Dis­trict of Colum­bia, but their union was ille­gal in Vir­ginia. A county judge offered a deal: They could avoid prison if they promised to leave Vir­ginia and not return for 25 years.

They moved to Wash­ing­ton, but a long­ing for home upended the agree­ment. Mil­dred, miss­ing her fam­ily, wrote a let­ter to Attor­ney Gen­eral Robert F. Kennedy. He referred the mat­ter to the Amer­i­can Civil Lib­er­ties Union, which chal­lenged the con­sti­tu­tion­al­ity of Virginia’s anti-​miscegenation law. Yet the Lov­ings — Richard died in 1975, and Mil­dred in 2008 — were reluc­tant civil rights icons.

It was thrown in my lap,” Mrs. Lov­ing told a Times reporter in 1992. “What choice did I have?”

Indeed. Love is what it is. Hard to imag­ine going to prison for such a thing, but I’m glad I was born when I was born.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_98116” align=“aligncenter” width=“300”] If I knew who did this, I’d cite it. Such bril­liance should be credited.[/caption]

My own fam­ily is mul­tira­cial, mul­ti­eth­nic, and multi­na­tional. It’s dif­fi­cult to imag­ine hav­ing it any other way. Of course, Amer­ica has always been all those things, but now, of course, we’re far less hyp­o­crit­i­cal about it.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel ten­ta­tively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Fol­low her on Twit­ter and on Gab​.ai.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism!

by baldilocks

The 50th anniversary of Loving vs. Virginia is coming up. Yes, the link is from the New York Times, but it’s worth a read.

Monday will be 50 years since the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling in Loving vs. Virginia, the landmark case that wiped laws banning interracial marriage off the books in Virginia and 15 other states. Thus did Mildred Loving, both black and Native American, and her husband, Richard, who was white, make civil rights history. (…)

The Lovings were arrested in July 1958, when the local sheriff burst into their bedroom in the middle of the night, demanding to know what they were doing together. They had married in the District of Columbia, but their union was illegal in Virginia. A county judge offered a deal: They could avoid prison if they promised to leave Virginia and not return for 25 years.

They moved to Washington, but a longing for home upended the agreement. Mildred, missing her family, wrote a letter to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. He referred the matter to the American Civil Liberties Union, which challenged the constitutionality of Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law. Yet the Lovings — Richard died in 1975, and Mildred in 2008 — were reluctant civil rights icons.

“It was thrown in my lap,” Mrs. Loving told a Times reporter in 1992. “What choice did I have?”

Indeed. Love is what it is. Hard to imagine going to prison for such a thing, but I’m glad I was born when I was born.

If I knew who did this, I’d cite it. Such brilliance should be credited.

My own family is multiracial, multiethnic, and multinational. It’s difficult to imagine having it any other way. Of course, America has always been all those things, but now, of course, we’re far less hypocritical about it.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!