Readability

Forked

by baldilocks

Every now and then I won­der how dif­fer­ently my life might have gone had I made dif­fer­ent choices.

For instance, I won­der how deeply I might be involved in the so-​called Deep State had I remained a part of the intel­li­gence com­mu­nity. But that’s one deci­sion I have no regrets about. When I exited active duty USAF in 1994, I came home to Los Ange­les to be near my great-​aunt and great-​uncle who were then in their 70s. My uncle was gone six years later and my aunt would fol­low twelve years after that. The two raised me for the first part of my child­hood, so, of course, I am grate­ful to have been close by when they passed.

Other forks? I love chil­dren and I some­times wish I’d had at least one, but, other than my mis­car­riage, I can’t really call it a regret. And here’s an odd thing: I don’t think I’m good wife mate­r­ial — some­thing about which my ex-​husband would agree. I’m the first-​born and was a de facto only child for nine years; I’m ornery and often oblivious.

Since the divorce in 1992, there have been a cou­ple of close remar­riage calls, but no cigar. And, the only regret I have about that is that I mar­ried at all. I like men; I just haven’t found one that I want around all the time. I’ve cer­tainly been “in love,” but I think that, for me, much of that has been hal­lu­ci­na­tion on my part. Vain imag­i­na­tion.

Relat­ing that to hav­ing chil­dren, I’m old-​school: I believe in being mar­ried before hav­ing chil­dren. Let’s be real here: the main rea­son that I did get mar­ried was because I wanted children.

So, with my beliefs and idio­syn­crasies in mind, it’s likely that I would have never given birth even if I had made dif­fer­ent deci­sions. I’m at peace with that.

More roads taken. Just today, I met up with two old friends I’d met through blog­ging. Won­der­ful peo­ple. These and dozens of other good, fun and kind-​hearted peo­ple I would have never known had I not begun baldilocks.

I could go on but Yogi Berra’s sim­ple, funny, acci­den­tal wis­dom holds true: when you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel ten­ta­tively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Fol­low her on Twit­ter and on Gab​.ai.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism!

by baldilocks

Every now and then I wonder how differently my life might have gone had I made different choices.

For instance, I wonder how deeply I might be involved in the so-called Deep State had I remained a part of the intelligence community. But that’s one decision I have no regrets about. When I exited active duty USAF in 1994, I came home to Los Angeles to be near my great-aunt and great-uncle who were then in their 70s. My uncle was gone six years later and my aunt would follow twelve years after that. The two raised me for the first part of my childhood, so, of course, I am grateful to have been close by when they passed.

Other forks? I love children and I sometimes wish I’d had at least one, but, other than my miscarriage, I can’t really call it a regret. And here’s an odd thing: I don’t think I’m good wife material—something about which my ex-husband would agree. I’m the first-born and was a de facto only child for nine years; I’m ornery and often oblivious.

Since the divorce in 1992, there have been a couple of close remarriage calls, but no cigar. And, the only regret I have about that is that I married at all. I like men; I just haven’t found one that I want around all the time. I’ve certainly been “in love,” but I think that, for me, much of that has been hallucination on my part. Vain imagination.

Relating that to having children, I’m old-school: I believe in being married before having children. Let’s be real here: the main reason that I did get married was because I wanted children.

So, with my beliefs and idiosyncrasies in mind, it’s likely that I would have never given birth even if I had made different decisions. I’m at peace with that.

More roads taken. Just today, I met up with two old friends I’d met through blogging. Wonderful people. These and dozens of other good, fun and kind-hearted people I would have never known had I not begun baldilocks.

I could go on but Yogi Berra’s simple, funny, accidental wisdom holds true: when you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!