Aspirational marketing: Upscale toy kitchens

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Aspirational marketing: Upscale toy kitchens

So I turn on the TV this morn­ing to find Maria Bar­tiromo talk­ing about upscale toy kitchens for lit­tle kids. How upscale?

This upscale:

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If you go to the Pot­tery Barn page, they have stuff that will make the dweller of a tiny house or a Man­hat­tan apart­ment (but I repeat myself) weep with envy.

I love it.

As a pro-​Western val­ues, cis­gen­der, cap­i­tal­ist, anti-​abortion Chris­t­ian woman, I find it exhilarating.

What this tells me is that “you, dear girl or boy grow­ing up in Amer­ica today, can, through hard work and pur­pose, grow up to buy your­self, from your own earn­ings, the best appli­ances and mod­ern con­ve­niences for prepar­ing your fam­ily deli­cious meals in the com­fort of your own home.”

Add to that, “and when your kids are lit­tle you can get them beau­ti­ful toys if you have the room and can afford to.” (As you may remem­ber, I con­sider liv­ing within your means one of the twelve adult­ing steps.)

It warms my cap­i­tal­ist heart.

If you can afford it, buy­ing your chil­dren an upscale minia­ture kitchen is a bet­ter option, and I speak as a mother, than buy­ing them a tablet. My expe­ri­ence is that kids will pick up com­puter skills in no time at all, but they will need time to learn social and every­day man­age­ment skills as they grow up. Get­ting mini appli­ances is “a good thing,” as Martha Stew­art says.

We didn’t have the room in our house when my son was grow­ing up for a Pot­tery Barn mini-​kitchen, but he did have one drawer for his toy pans and plates and a Queasy Bake Oven,

He asked for a children’s cook­book when he was five, and has been cook­ing ever since. Most of his friends cook, too.

Now, if you will excuse me, I’ll be look­ing at the grown-​up kitchen toys at Williams Sonoma.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog. She still has the Queasy Bake oven.

So I turn on the TV this morning to find Maria Bartiromo talking about upscale toy kitchens for little kids. How upscale?

This upscale:

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

If you go to the Pottery Barn page, they have stuff that will make the dweller of a tiny house or a Manhattan apartment (but I repeat myself) weep with envy.

I love it.

As a pro-Western values, cisgender, capitalist, anti-abortion Christian woman, I find it exhilarating.

What this tells me is that “you, dear girl or boy growing up in America today, can, through hard work and purpose, grow up to buy yourself, from your own earnings, the best appliances and modern conveniences for preparing your family delicious meals in the comfort of your own home.”

Add to that, “and when your kids are little you can get them beautiful toys if you have the room and can afford to.” (As you may remember, I consider living within your means one of the twelve adulting steps.)

It warms my capitalist heart.

If you can afford it, buying your children an upscale miniature kitchen is a better option, and I speak as a mother, than buying them a tablet. My experience is that kids will pick up computer skills in no time at all, but they will need time to learn social and everyday management skills as they grow up. Getting mini appliances is “a good thing,” as Martha Stewart says.

We didn’t have the room in our house when my son was growing up for a Pottery Barn mini-kitchen, but he did have one drawer for his toy pans and plates and a Queasy Bake Oven,

He asked for a children’s cookbook when he was five, and has been cooking ever since. Most of his friends cook, too.

Now, if you will excuse me, I’ll be looking at the grown-up kitchen toys at Williams Sonoma.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes in U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog. She still has the Queasy Bake oven.