President Trump Six Months In

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President Trump Six Months In

When Pete asked me to write about my thoughts on the first six months of the Trump Pres­i­dency, my fist incli­na­tion was to echo the thoughts of Kurt Schlichter and say that he’s ful­filled my most impor­tant goal for a pres­i­dent: that of not being Hillary Clin­ton. His appoint­ment of Neil Gor­such, roll­back of reg­u­la­tions, and unabashed advo­cacy for west­ern civ­i­liza­tion and God, as artic­u­lated in his War­saw speech, are more than enough to mark his first six months as a qual­i­fied suc­cess. But there’s another cri­te­rion by which I think his pres­i­dency will be judged, and it’s one that will def­i­nitely not be reported on by the media.

I was not a Trump guy until he secured the nom­i­na­tion. I would have voted for him sim­ply because he wasn’t Hillary Clin­ton, but I started to come around when he released his list of judges and began speak­ing so force­fully about defund­ing Planned Par­ent­hood (which I sin­cerely hope even­tu­ally comes to pass). I’m sure I’m not alone in this jour­ney, but I think my wife is an exam­ple of a cul­tural shift that is going on that may have much more of an impact on our coun­try for the fore­see­able future.

My wife is as staunch a pro-​life Catholic as I am, but was never very polit­i­cal. She used to point out to me when she thought my Repub­li­can hat was cov­er­ing my Catholic eyes on cer­tain issues, she rarely, if ever, watched Fox News, and she was extremely anti-​Trump all through the pri­maries and most of the way through the gen­eral elec­tion. Up until a few weeks before the elec­tion, she was seri­ously con­sid­er­ing not vot­ing for either major can­di­date. It was the abor­tion issue that finally pushed her to vote for Trump. She and I stayed up on elec­tion night and high-​fived each other as the net­works called state after state for Trump, and even­tu­ally the election.

Since that time, my wife has had her eyes opened to the biased, unfair and down­right dis­hon­est treat­ment of pres­i­dent Trump and the Repub­li­can party that I had been try­ing to point out to her by both the media and the democ­rats. Where she used to accuse me of exag­ger­at­ing every slight, she now sees the depths to which the democrat-​media com­plex will sink to make the pres­i­dent look bad. She has taken to fol­low­ing pol­i­tics much more closely than she ever has before.

We both still would like to see the pres­i­dent tweet less and stick more to sub­stan­tive issues when he does, mostly because all his shoot-​from-​the-​hip tweets do is to give the media more rope with which to try and hang him. But the good news is that, for the first time, my wife is see­ing the democrat-​media reac­tion for exactly what it is. If my wife is at all indica­tive of a sig­nif­i­cant por­tion of the pop­u­la­tion, then I think per­haps pres­i­dent Trump’s great­est legacy may be the dis­so­lu­tion of the media’s abil­ity to drive the national con­ver­sa­tion so far to the left. Maybe this will give pres­i­dent Trump a lit­tle room to gov­ern as he promised to instead of hav­ing to spend so much of his time fight­ing off non­sense charges.

When Pete asked me to write about my thoughts on the first six months of the Trump Presidency, my fist inclination was to echo the thoughts of Kurt Schlichter and say that he’s fulfilled my most important goal for a president: that of not being Hillary Clinton. His appointment of Neil Gorsuch, rollback of regulations, and unabashed advocacy for western civilization and God, as articulated in his Warsaw speech, are more than enough to mark his first six months as a qualified success. But there’s another criterion by which I think his presidency will be judged, and it’s one that will definitely not be reported on by the media.

I was not a Trump guy until he secured the nomination. I would have voted for him simply because he wasn’t Hillary Clinton, but I started to come around when he released his list of judges and began speaking so forcefully about defunding Planned Parenthood (which I sincerely hope eventually comes to pass). I’m sure I’m not alone in this journey, but I think my wife is an example of a cultural shift that is going on that may have much more of an impact on our country for the foreseeable future.

My wife is as staunch a pro-life Catholic as I am, but was never very political. She used to point out to me when she thought my Republican hat was covering my Catholic eyes on certain issues, she rarely, if ever, watched Fox News, and she was extremely anti-Trump all through the primaries and most of the way through the general election. Up until a few weeks before the election, she was seriously considering not voting for either major candidate. It was the abortion issue that finally pushed her to vote for Trump. She and I stayed up on election night and high-fived each other as the networks called state after state for Trump, and eventually the election.

Since that time, my wife has had her eyes opened to the biased, unfair and downright dishonest treatment of president Trump and the Republican party that I had been trying to point out to her by both the media and the democrats. Where she used to accuse me of exaggerating every slight, she now sees the depths to which the democrat-media complex will sink to make the president look bad. She has taken to following politics much more closely than she ever has before.

We both still would like to see the president tweet less and stick more to substantive issues when he does, mostly because all his shoot-from-the-hip tweets do is to give the media more rope with which to try and hang him. But the good news is that, for the first time, my wife is seeing the democrat-media reaction for exactly what it is. If my wife is at all indicative of a significant portion of the population, then I think perhaps president Trump’s greatest legacy may be the dissolution of the media’s ability to drive the national conversation so far to the left. Maybe this will give president Trump a little room to govern as he promised to instead of having to spend so much of his time fighting off nonsense charges.