Red Century story makes me see red

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Red Century story makes me see red

Remem­ber the series of wist­ful arti­cles the New York Times ran in 2008 to mark the 75th anniver­sary of the birth of Adolf Hitler’s Thou­sand Year Reich?

Me nei­ther — because, of course, it never hap­pened. But that’s not as crazy as it sounds con­sid­er­ing the Times is run­ning a series of sto­ries under the ban­ner of “Red Cen­tury” to mark the cen­ten­nial of the Bol­she­vik Revolution.

In case you’ve for­got­ten, the advent of Soviet rule in Rus­sia ush­ered in an age of Com­mu­nist ter­ror whose death tally makes Nazism’s toll almost incon­se­quen­tial in com­par­i­son. But that hasn’t stopped the Times from pub­lish­ing rev­er­en­tial pieces writ­ten by the prog­eny of Reds who were active at home and abroad.

I have lim­ited tol­er­a­tion for sanc­ti­mo­nious crap, so I rarely click on a link to a Times story. Still, I’ve skimmed a cou­ple of the Red Ban­ner fea­tures just to see how much Com­mie pro­pa­ganda the paper will allow.

Then I stum­bled on one story that I had to read all the way through: ’s “My Grand­fa­ther, the Secret Police­man,” which was pub­lished July 31. www​.nytimes​.com/​2017​/​07​/​31​/​o​p​i​n​i​o​n​/​c​o​m​m​u​n​i​s​m​-​p​o​l​i​c​e​m​a​n​-​j​e​w​s​-​n​a​z​i​s​.html , a jour­nal­ist whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, L.A. Review of Books and online, recounts the adven­tures of his Pol­ish grand­fa­ther, Jakub, dur­ing and after World War II.

Him­self the son of a Com­mu­nist, Jakub estab­lished a name for him­self as an anti-​Nazi par­ti­san dur­ing the war before join­ing the Pol­ish secret police in 1945. Jakub was clearly a brave and clever man, and recounts his tale dis­pas­sion­ately. But while he doesn’t come out and praise Jakub’s cause, nei­ther does he con­demn it.

At the story’s end, seems to grap­ple with the real­iza­tion that he hasn’t come to terms with his grandfather’s role in the grand scheme of his­tory — nor given a full account of it.

What does it mean to fight on the right side of the war, but the wrong side of his­tory?” he writes.

Depend­ing on whom you ask today, my grandfather’s story is that of a par­ti­san, a trai­tor, a hero or a spy. The rev­o­lu­tion asked a ter­ri­ble amount of those who served it. Those who resisted paid a sim­i­larly awful price. It left in its wake count­less lives, like my grandfather’s, that can­not be com­passed by a sin­gle line.”

Such a state­ment doesn’t make up for the many facts omit­ted from his story, start­ing with the German-​Soviet Nonag­gres­sion Pact signed on Aug. 23, 1939, which directly led to Hitler’s inva­sion of Poland on Sept. 1. A secret pro­to­col of the treaty called for the par­ti­tion of Poland, with Ger­many get­ting the west­ern por­tion and the Sovi­ets the east. The Sovi­ets invaded on Sept. 17 to grab their half of the spoils.

Also left out is what hap­pened to Poland in the roughly 21 months of Soviet rule. Hun­dreds of thou­sands of Poles were deported to Kaza­khstan, Siberia and other points east dur­ing the occu­pa­tion. Even worse, more than 22,000 mil­i­tary offi­cers, politi­cians, pro­fes­sors, priests and other civic lead­ers were exe­cuted in what is col­lec­tively known as the Katyn For­est massacres.

writes that the Nazis in 1939 cap­tured his grand­fa­ther, then a Pol­ish sol­dier, but he escaped and made his way to Minsk, the cap­i­tal of Belarus. Curi­ously, he doesn’t explain why Jakub didn’t halt his flight in Soviet-​occupied Poland instead of going hun­dreds of miles to the east. Maybe didn’t want to bring up all that awk­ward par­ti­tion busi­ness and Nazi-​Soviet hanky panky.

So says it depends on your per­spec­tive whether Jakub, a Soviet pawn, was “a par­ti­san, a trai­tor, a hero or a spy.” Let me tell you about a cou­ple of Poles whom I con­sider noth­ing but heroes.

My Dzi­adzia (grand­fa­ther) was barely out of boy­hood when he came to Amer­ica shortly after the turn of the 20th cen­tury. After World War I broke out, he attended a rally in Toronto fea­tur­ing Gen­eral Józef Haller, who called on Pol­ish emi­gres to return to Europe and free their home­land. Stirred by emo­tion, Dzi­adzia signed up to join the Pol­ish Legions on the spot.

From 1916 to 1918, Dzi­adzia fought against the Ger­mans in France. The Pol­ish Legions’ efforts alone may not have restored Poland as an inde­pen­dent coun­try, but they played a part. Hav­ing done his job, Dzi­adzia returned to the United States and raised a fam­ily. He sent four sons, includ­ing my dad, to fight against Ger­many and Japan in World War II.

Mean­while, the fam­ily he had left behind in east­ern Poland didn’t fare as well as my and

I wish I could offer as many details about my grand­fa­ther as pro­vides about his, but died when I was 4. All I recall are his smiles and kind­ness. While he passed on some sto­ries to my dad, he didn’t like talk­ing much about his cousins because it was too painful.

You could take the sto­ries of my fam­ily and mul­ti­ply them by thou­sands to get an idea of what hap­pened in Poland dur­ing World War II. It’s too bad the New York Times will never run that story.

Update (DTG) Insta­lance, well done Mick, Wel­come Instapun­dit read­ers, check out my 1st per­son cov­er­age of events on the Boston com­mon with video here. See the data that proves the left’s “The south turned repub­li­can because of the civil rights act” meme false here and if you like what you’ve seen from Mick and want to sup­port inde­pen­dent jour­nal­ism please con­sider hit­ting DaTip­Jar to help me secure my next pay­check ($370 to go) by hit­ting DaTip­Jar below.




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Remember the series of wistful articles the New York Times ran in 2008 to mark the 75th anniversary of the birth of Adolf Hitler’s Thousand Year Reich?

Me neither — because, of course, it never happened. But that’s not as crazy as it sounds considering the Times is running a series of stories under the banner of “Red Century” to mark the centennial of the Bolshevik Revolution.

In case you’ve forgotten, the advent of Soviet rule in Russia ushered in an age of Communist terror whose death tally makes Nazism’s toll almost inconsequential in comparison. But that hasn’t stopped the Times from publishing reverential pieces written by the progeny of Reds who were active at home and abroad.

I have limited toleration for sanctimonious crap, so I rarely click on a link to a Times story. Still, I’ve skimmed a couple of the Red Banner features just to see how much Commie propaganda the paper will allow.

Then I stumbled on one story that I had to read all the way through: ‘s “My Grandfather, the Secret Policeman,” which was published July 31. www.nytimes.com/2017/07/31/opinion/communism-policeman-jews-nazis.html  , a journalist whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, L.A. Review of Books and online, recounts the adventures of his Polish grandfather, Jakub, during and after World War II.

Himself the son of a Communist, Jakub established a name for himself as an anti-Nazi partisan during the war before joining the Polish secret police in 1945. Jakub was clearly a brave and clever man, and recounts his tale dispassionately. But while he doesn’t come out and praise Jakub’s cause, neither does he condemn it.

At the story’s end, seems to grapple with the realization that he hasn’t come to terms with his grandfather’s role in the grand scheme of history — nor given a full account of it.

“What does it mean to fight on the right side of the war, but the wrong side of history?” he writes.

“Depending on whom you ask today, my grandfather’s story is that of a partisan, a traitor, a hero or a spy. The revolution asked a terrible amount of those who served it. Those who resisted paid a similarly awful price. It left in its wake countless lives, like my grandfather’s, that cannot be compassed by a single line.”

Such a statement doesn’t make up for the many facts omitted from his story, starting with the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact signed on Aug. 23, 1939, which directly led to Hitler’s invasion of Poland on Sept. 1. A secret protocol of the treaty called for the partition of Poland, with Germany getting the western portion and the Soviets the east. The Soviets invaded on Sept. 17 to grab their half of the spoils.

Also left out is what happened to Poland in the roughly 21 months of Soviet rule. Hundreds of thousands of Poles were deported to Kazakhstan, Siberia and other points east during the occupation. Even worse, more than 22,000 military officers, politicians, professors, priests and other civic leaders were executed in what is collectively known as the Katyn Forest massacres.

writes that the Nazis in 1939 captured his grandfather, then a Polish soldier, but he escaped and made his way to Minsk, the capital of Belarus. Curiously, he doesn’t explain why Jakub didn’t halt his flight in Soviet-occupied Poland instead of going hundreds of miles to the east. Maybe didn’t want to bring up all that awkward partition business and Nazi-Soviet hanky panky.

So says it depends on your perspective whether Jakub, a Soviet pawn, was “a partisan, a traitor, a hero or a spy.” Let me tell you about a couple of Poles whom I consider nothing but heroes.

My Dziadzia (grandfather) was barely out of boyhood when he came to America shortly after the turn of the 20th century. After World War I broke out, he attended a rally in Toronto featuring General Józef Haller, who called on Polish emigres to return to Europe and free their homeland. Stirred by emotion, Dziadzia signed up to join the Polish Legions on the spot.

From 1916 to 1918, Dziadzia fought against the Germans in France. The Polish Legions’ efforts alone may not have restored Poland as an independent country, but they played a part. Having done his job, Dziadzia returned to the United States and raised a family. He sent four sons, including my dad, to fight against Germany and Japan in World War II.

Meanwhile, the family he had left behind in eastern Poland didn’t fare as well as my and

I wish I could offer as many details about my grandfather as provides about his, but died when I was 4. All I recall are his smiles and kindness. While he passed on some stories to my dad, he didn’t like talking much about his cousins because it was too painful.

You could take the stories of my family and multiply them by thousands to get an idea of what happened in Poland during World War II. It’s too bad the New York Times will never run that story.

Update (DTG) Instalance, well done Mick, Welcome Instapundit readers, check out my 1st person coverage of events on the Boston common with video here.  See the data that proves the left’s “The south turned republican because of the civil rights act” meme false here and if you like what you’ve seen from Mick and want to support independent journalism please consider hitting DaTipJar to help me secure my next paycheck ($370 to go) by hitting DaTipJar below.




Please consider subscribing, Not only does that get you my weekly podcast emailed to you before it appears either on the site or at the 405media which graciously carries it on a weekly basis but if you subscribe at any level I will send you an autographed copy of my new book from Imholt Press: Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer


Choose a Subscription level