And The Winner Is: An Anti-Christian, American-Bashing, Feminist Screed

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And The Winner Is: An Anti-Christian, American-Bashing, Feminist Screed

One of the most reveal­ing exam­ples of the cul­tural divide occurred when Emmy vot­ers deter­mined that The Handmaid’s Tale was the best drama on tele­vi­sion. Fur­ther­more, Elis­a­beth Moss won an Emmy for her role as best actress. All told, this dread­ful tele­vi­sion pro­gram won eight awards.

Based on a novel by Mar­garet Atwood, this series is set in Gilead, a total­i­tar­ian soci­ety in what used to be part of the United States. Gilead is ruled by a “Chris­t­ian” régime that treats women as prop­erty of the state and is faced with envi­ron­men­tal dis­as­ters and a plum­met­ing birth rate. To repop­u­late a dev­as­tated world, the few remain­ing fer­tile women are forced into sex­ual servitude.

The régime hangs gays, abor­tion clinic work­ers, and… wait for it…Catholics.

I admit I tried 15 min­utes of Episode One a few months ago with­out really know­ing what the pro­gram was about. Sim­ply put, I quickly found the show offen­sive, includ­ing the use of Gilead, an actual region from the Bible in what is now Jordan.

The author is a fem­i­nist from Canada who writes what she calls “spec­u­la­tive fic­tion.” In The Guardian, she says, “Spec­u­la­tive fic­tion could really happen.”

That’s right. She thinks that a total­i­tar­ian gov­ern­ment based in the United States could cre­ate a state with women as sex­ual slaves.

Fur­ther­more, Atwood is vir­u­lently anti-​American, see­ing Canada as the only hope for North America.

Accord­ing to var­i­ous sources, the author is part of the animals-​are-​people-​too brigade. In Sur­fac­ing, one char­ac­ter remarks about eat­ing ani­mals: “The ani­mals die that we may live; they are sub­sti­tute people…And we eat them, out of cans or oth­er­wise; we are eaters of death, dead Christ-​flesh res­ur­rect­ing inside us, grant­ing us life.”

This wingnut is a left­ist in every sense of the word.

Atwood has received numer­ous awards for her books — an indi­ca­tion that some­thing is clearly wrong with the sen­si­bil­i­ties of the cul­tural elite.

In a related devel­op­ment, Axios​.com, a lead­ing polit­i­cal web­site, reported about a study of 3,500 view­ers nation­wide that “showed that view­ers who voted for … Hillary Clin­ton are more inter­ested in dark come­dies and pro­grams fea­tur­ing uncon­ven­tional fam­i­lies, anti­heroes, and strong female leads … Clin­ton vot­ers also like polit­i­cal satire.”

Trump vot­ers “are more likely to favor shows that depict tra­di­tional fam­ily val­ues. They pre­fer male leads and heroes who are not con­flicted and ‘tend to do the right thing’ … They are likely to tune out enter­tain­ment shows with depic­tions of gay peo­ple in sex­ual sit­u­a­tions, neg­a­tive por­tray­als of reli­gion, and polit­i­cal humor.”

It seems clear that the Emmy vot­ers fall on the Clin­ton side of this equa­tion. It’s scan­dalous that this piece of tripe, The Handmaid’s Tale, became the dar­ling of the cul­tural elite. For­tu­nately, the series runs on Hulu, so not that many peo­ple saw it.

Well, I guess it’s time for me to get back to Shooter, The Last Ship, and a few other favorites of my fel­low Trump supporters.

Foot­note: I hope that Hulu does a bet­ter job with The Loom­ing Tower, which is the best book on 911 and sched­uled for broad­cast in the next year.

One of the most revealing examples of the cultural divide occurred when Emmy voters determined that The Handmaid’s Tale was the best drama on television. Furthermore, Elisabeth Moss won an Emmy for her role as best actress. All told, this dreadful television program won eight awards.

Based on a novel by Margaret Atwood, this series is set in Gilead, a totalitarian society in what used to be part of the United States. Gilead is ruled by a “Christian” regime that treats women as property of the state and is faced with environmental disasters and a plummeting birth rate. To repopulate a devastated world, the few remaining fertile women are forced into sexual servitude.

The regime hangs gays, abortion clinic workers, and… wait for it…Catholics.

I admit I tried 15 minutes of Episode One a few months ago without really knowing what the program was about. Simply put, I quickly found the show offensive, including the use of Gilead, an actual region from the Bible in what is now Jordan.

The author is a feminist from Canada who writes what she calls “speculative fiction.” In The Guardian, she says, “Speculative fiction could really happen.”

That’s right. She thinks that a totalitarian government based in the United States could create a state with women as sexual slaves.

Furthermore, Atwood is virulently anti-American, seeing Canada as the only hope for North America.

According to various sources, the author is part of the animals-are-people-too brigade. In Surfacing, one character remarks about eating animals: “The animals die that we may live; they are substitute people…And we eat them, out of cans or otherwise; we are eaters of death, dead Christ-flesh resurrecting inside us, granting us life.”

This wingnut is a leftist in every sense of the word.

Atwood has received numerous awards for her books—an indication that something is clearly wrong with the sensibilities of the cultural elite.

In a related development, Axios.com, a leading political website, reported about a study of 3,500 viewers nationwide that “showed that viewers who voted for … Hillary Clinton are more interested in dark comedies and programs featuring unconventional families, antiheroes, and strong female leads … Clinton voters also like political satire.”

Trump voters “are more likely to favor shows that depict traditional family values. They prefer male leads and heroes who are not conflicted and ‘tend to do the right thing’ … They are likely to tune out entertainment shows with depictions of gay people in sexual situations, negative portrayals of religion, and political humor.”

It seems clear that the Emmy voters fall on the Clinton side of this equation. It’s scandalous that this piece of tripe, The Handmaid’s Tale, became the darling of the cultural elite. Fortunately, the series runs on Hulu, so not that many people saw it.

Well, I guess it’s time for me to get back to Shooter, The Last Ship, and a few other favorites of my fellow Trump supporters.

Footnote: I hope that Hulu does a better job with The Looming Tower, which is the best book on 9/11 and scheduled for broadcast in the next year.