Although I am a California man, I love hockey and have ever since I was a kid, transistor radio hidden beneath my pillow so I could listen to California Golden Seals game. I was devastated when during my high school years the Seals first moved to Cleveland and then “merged with” (translation: disappeared into) the then Minnesota North Stars, now the Dallas Stars. I was beyond ecstatic when the San Jose Sharks came to be, and have faithfully followed them since.

Joel Ward is a veteran forward on the Sharks and one of the regrettably few black players in the National Hockey League. A couple of days ago he said he might join in on the current spate of whatever you want to call it sweeping the sports world. He then demonstrated why you should love hockey even if you hate sports:

He put thought into the matter. Quote:

Over the last several days, I have been asked if I would consider kneeling during the playing of the U.S. national anthem. It’s something I have spent a lot of time thinking about.

As a black man, I have experienced racism both inside and outside of the sporting world. I have been pulled over by law enforcement for no reason. I have been looked at suspiciously because of the color of my skin.

I hold an immense amount of respect for the many players – across the sporting world – that have chosen to peacefully bring attention to a couple of big issues in today’s society, which are inequality and the use of excessive force against people of color in the United States of America. Make no mistake that racism exists and that people of color are treated differently on a day-to-day basis.

I also feel that the original message that was trying to be communicated has been lost. The focus has shifted to the act of the kneeling itself or to a protest of the flag itself or the military. What are we really talking about here?

I feel extremely lucky to be able to play this great game of hockey, but even within our own game, we can treat each other better than we currently do at all levels of the sport. There is still progress to be made.

And that’s where I want everyone to re-focus their attention – on moving progress forward. We need to be working on bridging the gap between people of all color, and between law enforcement and minorities. How can we be a part of the solution and not part of the problem – or be another distraction from what the real issues are?

Although I fully support those who before me have taken the lead in bringing awareness to these issues, I will not kneel during the national anthem like my brothers have done.

But now that I have the world’s attention, let’s meet at the kitchen table, the locker room or in the stands and continue the healing process. Let our collective focus be on bridging the gap between communities – on working to heal generations of unequal treatment of people of color in the United States of America – and not turning our backs on that which is hard to face head on.

I will continue to work within my community to help improve the lives of others, and I intend to partner with groups dedicated to bridging racial inequality and fostering a better relationship between law enforcement and people of all color.

If we spend more time talking about these real issues instead of the actions that are taking place in an attempt to raise awareness about them, we will be a much richer and stronger society.

Joel Randal Ward

“I believe in the goodness of a free society. And I believe that the society can remain good only as long as we are willing to fight for it, and to fight against whatever imperfections may exist.” – Jackie Robinson

It’s something for both sides to think about. And act upon.

Thank you, Joel. And LET’S GO SHARKS!

The evidence has been documented numerous times that cutting taxes improves the economy in ways that replace “lost” revenues for the federal government. In other words, reduced tax burdens spark economic growth with over time yield a revenue-neutral stance. This is the part about the proposed GOP tax cuts that I like.

There are two big problems with it, though. We haven’t seen nearly the level of cuts necessary to balance the budget or attack the unfathomable debt problem the nation faces. It’s time to slash and burn in DC; we need to eliminated entire programs like Obamacare, agencies like the EPA, and even departments such as the Department of Education.

The second problems is that this isn’t really a tax “reform.” They’re calling it “reform” because it’s a powerful word that makes people feel good, but this is still the same progressive tax system that’s been failing miserably for decades. As Daniel Horowitz at Conservative Review notes, there’s no right way to fix the progressive tax.

I’ve been exploring everything from a fair tax to a flat tax to a neutral tax. All have merits. All have flaws. Now is not the time to go over them or other plans in detail, but one thing is certain. We need to implement REAL reform if we’re going to make a true impact on how the national government operates. The system is broken and smarter people than me need to get together and explore the options.

Back to cuts. Standard operating procedure in Washington DC is to bifurcate taxing and spending. They try to convince us that they’re two different conversations that should be handled independently. This is illogical and an insult to our collective intelligence. If you’re deciding what car to buy, you don’t pick a car and do the math on the monthly payments later. If you’re income fluctuates, you don’t buy things based upon the best case scenario. This is personal economics 101, yet the federal government wants us to believe this logical thinking doesn’t apply to them.

Why do they bifurcate? It’s all a smokescreen. I’m not a conspiracy theorist who believes everything the government does has nefarious undertones, but this is very clear to anyone paying attention. They don’t want to talk about taxing and spending at the same time because it means revealing the truth about both. It’s easier for them to say, “we need this much revenue regardless of expenses” while simultaneously saying, “we need to spend this much regardless of revenues.”

To tackle tax reform before tackling spending isn’t just putting the cart before the horse. It’s detaching the cart from the horse and then questioning why it won’t move. We need to address them simultaneously. If that’s too complicated for DC, then they need to tackle spending first. Instead, we’re hearing about trillion dollar infrastructure plans that may no longer receive private funding relief, an expensive border wall that Mexico apparently isn’t going to pay for, and Obamacare “repeal” bills that don’t significantly reduce DC’s financial role. No, block grants don’t change the fact that DC still has to collect the money first.

If DC really wants to boost the economy, they need to start by cutting spending and regulations. The latter seems to be in motion; kudos to the President for keeping that promise. The former isn’t even close to happening. It needs to happen quickly. Otherwise, Republicans are the same big spenders as the Democrats, just focused on different issues.

Buried in all the news about the NFL is a paragraph in this observer piece by Ashe Snow that perfectly encapsulates what the media don’t get about Donald Trump and twitter

Tweets mean nothing. It takes no effort at all to send one. Acting like Trump actually spent all day Monday caring about the NFL because of what he tweeted is absurd. Does the media really think all he does is tweet? It sure seems like it. They would rather write dozens of articles about every single one of the president’s tweets than look into what he’s actually doing.

That’s the real secret about Donald Trump and twitter, he understand the media mind set, he knows that with just a few tweets he can send them down a rabbit hole all day while he gets work done, or to push them in a direction they don’t want to go, or get the heat off of a project that he is dealing with or lobbying for.

A great example of this has been the reactions on WEEI on Trump that I hear when I drive in and go home from work. For some reason the libs on the station think that Trump is obsessed with the NFL, the reality is that his line at the rally last monday was a throw away applause line and once he saw the reaction it only took a few tweets to get them and the left where he wanted. I doubt he spent more than 3-4 minutes a day on it, but the media was fully committed and while they were congratulating themselves over the NFL’s “victory” over Trump and taking knees in congress Trump was getting things done in Puerto Rico without worrying about the media butting in.

Politico reported, “Rossello and other officials praised the federal government for planning its response in detail before the storm hit, a contrast with what Puerto Rico has long seen as the neglect of 3.4 million Americans living in a territory without a vote in Congress or the electoral college.”

There is only one issue I have with the piece, and that’s this line:

I’m not defending Trump’s tweets. I wish he’d stop.

Snow is dead wrong there. Trump’s tweets are a valuable weapon against the left. Via twitter he gets his message out without them forcing them to react to him rather than the other way around and putting them into battles they don’t want to fight and baiting them into positions they can’t defend. Why do you think they keep attacking his tweets every chance they get?

Tweet away Mr. President, Tweet Away.

A few days ago I wrote that the entire NFL protest business was a trap for Democrats that they cheerfully walked right into:

this helps Trump in places that he needs to win again and hurts him in places that he’s doesn’t, while helping the left in places that they are already winning in and hurts them in swing states and districts.

Because nothing is going to win over white working class voters than a bunch of rich athletes talking about how oppressed they are by the country that made them rich.

I got a lot of grief over thing on twitter both from the left and from nevertrumpers who insisted that this was a huge defeat for Trump and a huge win for the NFL and that the President has embarrassed himself.

Three days later this is from the Hill:

While Democrats broadly say Trump’s fight with the NFL and NBA will help them politically in both the 2018 and 2020 elections, they also appear wary of completely entering the fray on the controversial issue.

Potential candidates such as Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) didn’t put out press releases on the issue or weigh in on Twitter, at least as of Tuesday night.

That’s odd? I thought the media both political and sports called this a losing issue for Trump.

Democratic insiders, strategists and sources close to potential candidates say it’s tricky to work out the right message that knocks Trump for what many privately see as race baiting but that is not perceived as criticism of the flag or anthem.

Being cast as insufficiently patriotic is a charge countless Democrats have had to deal with for generations.

“I think everyone is aware of the tight rope we have to walk on this issue,” said one Democrat who has spoken to Democratic National Committee officials about the latest controversy. “I think that’s something we’re all trying to figure out now.”

Harris’s and Warren’s offices declined to comment for this story. Sanders’s and Booker’s offices did not respond to requests for comment.

Remember these are national democrat candidates who are trying to appeal to Democrat primary voter and not even the candidates of color like Booker or Harris are willing to go out there.

If these national ultra liberals candidates are not willing to put themselves out there, how much less willing will Democrat candidates for Senate in Red States be willing to do so?

To find out I called Claire McCaskill’s office to get commentary I was transferred to the Press office’s voice mail where I left a message asking “Does Senator McCaskill support or oppose NFL players kneeling for the National anthem?”

Over the next several days I’m going to call offices of the all the other Senators running for Re-election in 2018. It will be interesting to see if the answers vary based on both party and how their state voted in 2016.

I’ll give the last word to Ari Fleischer

I think 2018 will be just as much fun.


If you like what you’ve seen here and want to support independent journalism please hit DaTipJar below.




Please consider subscribing, Not only does that get you my weekly podcast emailed to you before it appears either on the site or at the 405media which graciously carries it on a weekly basis but if you subscribe at any level I will send you an autographed copy of my new book from Imholt Press: Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer


Choose a Subscription level



(or you can buy one here)