The Comments on this NYT Story on Cuban Doctors Revolting over Slave Wages Are Priceless

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The Comments on this NYT Story on Cuban Doctors Revolting over Slave Wages Are Priceless

It was a real shock to see this story at the NYT titled Cuban Doc­tors Revolt: “You get tried of being a slave”

Thou­sands of Cuban doc­tors work abroad under con­tracts with the Cuban author­i­ties. Coun­tries like Brazil pay the island’s Com­mu­nist gov­ern­ment mil­lions of dol­lars every month to pro­vide the med­ical ser­vices, effec­tively mak­ing the doc­tors Cuba’s most valu­able export.

But the doc­tors get a small cut of that money, and a grow­ing num­ber of them in Brazil have begun to rebel. In the last year, at least 150 Cuban doc­tors have filed law­suits in Brazil­ian courts to chal­lenge the arrange­ment, demand­ing to be treated as inde­pen­dent con­trac­tors who earn full salaries, not agents of the Cuban state.

When you leave Cuba for the first time, you dis­cover many things that you had been blind to,” said Yaili Jiménez Gutier­rez, one of the doc­tors who filed suit. “There comes a time when you get tired of being a slave.”

How­ever I found these com­ments left by Times read­ers not shock­ing at all:

Some of these doc­tors feel that they are vic­tims of injus­tice? They signed con­tracts, no? I can’t under­stand how they’re even being being heard by Brazil’s legal sys­tem. If they’re unhappy with the deal they agreed to, these whin­ers can return to Cuba.

That’s Steve B from NYC, I won­der if he will com­plain if the plows don’t come on time this snow season?

I won­der if this small group of doc­tors will pay back the Cuban gov­ern­ment for their free edu­ca­tion? The pro­gram seems like our Peace Corps; or sim­i­lar pro­grams in the US where if the gov­ern­ment pays your tuition to become a teacher you have to do a few years of work in poor com­mu­ni­ties. They seem like a small self­ish group out of a large pool of doc­tors who served. Don’t look to these folks to join up with Doc­tors With­out Borders.

That’s Jerry from Chicago. If only those Cuban doc­tors were as woke as he is.

The free med­ical edu­ca­tion that a large num­ber of Cubans receive has always been in stark con­trast to U.S., where the cost to become an MD, to that med stu­dent, could prob­a­bly cover med­ical care for a Brazil­ian vil­lage for a year, and maybe even food and shel­ter. Cuban doc­tors have been part of vol­un­teer mis­sions, in addi­tion to the arrange­ments like that in the arti­cle. This human­i­tar­ian mis­sion– to pro­vide health care to the world when it is asked for– has always been an inspi­ra­tion. I seri­ously doubt that Cuba was paid for the doc­tors who have gone to hur­ri­cane wasted islands or to HIV rav­aged coun­tries. I am a lit­tle dis­ap­pointed in these doc­tors in Brazil, but they are just human beings, sus­cep­ti­ble to the pull of the dol­lar, like ath­letes who have defected. But they are not exploited slaves, and as was pointed out in the arti­cle, knew what they signed up for. Can you blame Cuba for try­ing to be com­pen­sated when it had that oppor­tu­nity? It is a poor coun­try that espe­cially needs help now, after Irma.

That’s Kath­leen from Penn­syl­va­nia who didn’t like ath­letes who defected want to make a buck, her com­ment is a NYT Top Pick

These doc­tors received a first-​rate edu­ca­tion totally free of charge, and call them­selves slaves because they can‘t profit from their train­ing as much as they want? It sounds they were born in the wrong country.

That’s Richard from San Fran­cisco, also a top Pick, I bet he’s a big fan of the Fight for $15.

These doc­tors have what­ever rights they think they have to get more money, no argu­ment from me ; how­ever, lets not for­get that their edu­ca­tion was free.
Are they will­ing to reim­burse the gov­ern­ment of Cuba for their edu­ca­tion? They should!. They would have to do it in here in the USA or any other coun­try.
There are some lies on this arti­cle that they need to set straight and I will leave it at that. They can demand what­ever they want with­out malign­ing the coun­try that gave them what they have. Many of these doc­tors would never have made it to a uni­ver­sity in the USA nor med­ical school as it is extremely expen­sive to go to med­ical school.
I know .. my daugh­ter is a third year med­ical stu­dent and so far , her “bill” is close to 400K.
I do not feel sorry for them, $908.00 dol­lars a month is a for­tune in Cuban pesos, about 22,700 pesos a month and read­ers, all is rel­a­tive: many Cubans own their homes. there are no taxes to speak of; Cubans mostly need to worry about food ( not enough due to the embargo con­straints) . And if they think that $3,620 a month per doc­tor is a lot, they are in for a sur­prise as that amount will not pay for a small sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dure in the USA.

That’s Lidice, New York City another top pick who appar­ently thinks her daugh­ter should have gone to med­ical school in Cuba instead.

Remem­ber these are all Amer­i­cans, liv­ing in Amer­ica most in big cities gov­erned by Democ­rats, so remem­ber that the next time Democ­rats ask you to vote for them because they are for the lit­tle guy.

Clos­ing thought: I bet every sin­gle one of these peo­ple cri­tiquing these doc­tors stand behind the take a knee protests by mil­lion­aire athletes.

It was a real shock to see this story at the NYT titled Cuban Doctors Revolt: “You get tried of being a slave”

Thousands of Cuban doctors work abroad under contracts with the Cuban authorities. Countries like Brazil pay the island’s Communist government millions of dollars every month to provide the medical services, effectively making the doctors Cuba’s most valuable export.

But the doctors get a small cut of that money, and a growing number of them in Brazil have begun to rebel. In the last year, at least 150 Cuban doctors have filed lawsuits in Brazilian courts to challenge the arrangement, demanding to be treated as independent contractors who earn full salaries, not agents of the Cuban state.

“When you leave Cuba for the first time, you discover many things that you had been blind to,” said Yaili Jiménez Gutierrez, one of the doctors who filed suit. “There comes a time when you get tired of being a slave.”

However I found these comments left by Times readers not shocking at all:

Some of these doctors feel that they are victims of injustice? They signed contracts, no? I can’t understand how they’re even being being heard by Brazil’s legal system. If they’re unhappy with the deal they agreed to, these whiners can return to Cuba.

That’s Steve B from NYC, I wonder if he will complain if the plows don’t come on time this snow season?

I wonder if this small group of doctors will pay back the Cuban government for their free education? The program seems like our Peace Corps; or similar programs in the US where if the government pays your tuition to become a teacher you have to do a few years of work in poor communities. They seem like a small selfish group out of a large pool of doctors who served. Don’t look to these folks to join up with Doctors Without Borders.

That’s Jerry from Chicago. If only those Cuban doctors were as woke as he is.

The free medical education that a large number of Cubans receive has always been in stark contrast to U.S., where the cost to become an MD, to that med student, could probably cover medical care for a Brazilian village for a year, and maybe even food and shelter. Cuban doctors have been part of volunteer missions, in addition to the arrangements like that in the article. This humanitarian mission– to provide health care to the world when it is asked for– has always been an inspiration. I seriously doubt that Cuba was paid for the doctors who have gone to hurricane wasted islands or to HIV ravaged countries. I am a little disappointed in these doctors in Brazil, but they are just human beings, susceptible to the pull of the dollar, like athletes who have defected. But they are not exploited slaves, and as was pointed out in the article, knew what they signed up for. Can you blame Cuba for trying to be compensated when it had that opportunity? It is a poor country that especially needs help now, after Irma.

That’s Kathleen from Pennsylvania who didn’t like athletes who defected want to make a buck, her comment is a NYT Top Pick

These doctors received a first-rate education totally free of charge, and call themselves slaves because they can`t profit from their training as much as they want? It sounds they were born in the wrong country.

That’s Richard from San Francisco, also a top Pick, I bet he’s a big fan of the Fight for $15.

These doctors have whatever rights they think they have to get more money, no argument from me ; however, lets not forget that their education was free.
Are they willing to reimburse the government of Cuba for their education? They should!. They would have to do it in here in the USA or any other country.
There are some lies on this article that they need to set straight and I will leave it at that. They can demand whatever they want without maligning the country that gave them what they have. Many of these doctors would never have made it to a university in the USA nor medical school as it is extremely expensive to go to medical school.
I know .. my daughter is a third year medical student and so far , her “bill” is close to 400K.
I do not feel sorry for them, $908.00 dollars a month is a fortune in Cuban pesos, about 22,700 pesos a month and readers, all is relative: many Cubans own their homes. there are no taxes to speak of; Cubans mostly need to worry about food ( not enough due to the embargo constraints) . And if they think that $3,620 a month per doctor is a lot, they are in for a surprise as that amount will not pay for a small surgical procedure in the USA.

That’s Lidice, New York City another top pick who apparently thinks her daughter should have gone to medical school in Cuba instead.

Remember these are all Americans, living in America most in big cities governed by Democrats, so remember that the next time Democrats ask you to vote for them because they are for the little guy.

Closing thought: I bet every single one of these people critiquing these doctors stand behind the take a knee protests by millionaire athletes.