DC needs a reset

DC needs a reset

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DC needs a reset

I’ve been in Wash­ing­ton DC for two days and I can’t wait to go home. As polit­i­cally hor­ri­ble as things can be in South­ern Cal­i­for­nia, at least the lib­er­als are easy to spot. In DC, it’s hard to tell who sup­ports who, which direc­tion the winds will take them, and whether or not their stance today will match their stance tomorrow.

I’m here for some impor­tant meet­ings about push­ing for­ward with the Fed­er­al­ist Party. No, I’m not going to pitch you on it here. I know there are still plenty of con­ser­v­a­tives who believe in the Repub­li­can agenda and their abil­ity to deliver, so this isn’t the venue. What I hope we can all agree on is the notion that DC needs a con­ser­v­a­tive reset, one that looks to the Con­sti­tu­tion as the frame­work through which we must gov­ern this nation.

Some of the peo­ple I’ve been speak­ing to here are known con­ser­v­a­tives. They’re not “RINOs” who cam­paign on con­ser­v­a­tive val­ues then lurch left once they’re in office. Despite this, the atmos­phere is far more pas­sive than I would have expected. It’s almost as if they’ve given up hope to pass any­thing mean­ing­ful that would limit gov­ern­ment, bal­ance the bud­get, remove the imped­i­ments DC has put on busi­ness, or attack the national debt. I came very hope­ful and, with one more meet­ing sched­uled, feel as if they’re all defeated already. I’m hop­ing the last meet­ing with a con­ser­v­a­tive Con­gress­man will change my view, but right now I’m still befud­dled by the defeatist atti­tude. They feel like they can’t get any­thing done.

We need a reset, badly. I’m not talk­ing about a mini-​Tea-​Party rev­o­lu­tion that yielded far less than most would admit. I’m not even talk­ing about what Steve Ban­non is try­ing to do to dis­rupt the sys­tem by find­ing pri­mary oppo­nents for pretty much every Sen­a­tor up for reelec­tion other than Ted Cruz. What we need is a fun­da­men­tal change, a new direc­tion that focuses on our nation’s roots within the con­straints of the Constitution.

Call this a rant, if you will, but I’m more ener­gized about build­ing a limit-​government agenda than I’ve ever been. DC does that to con­ser­v­a­tives as long as they’re not exposed to the swamp for too long. I can’t wait to leave, but I know I have to return soon.

I’ve been in Washington DC for two days and I can’t wait to go home. As politically horrible as things can be in Southern California, at least the liberals are easy to spot. In DC, it’s hard to tell who supports who, which direction the winds will take them, and whether or not their stance today will match their stance tomorrow.

I’m here for some important meetings about pushing forward with the Federalist Party. No, I’m not going to pitch you on it here. I know there are still plenty of conservatives who believe in the Republican agenda and their ability to deliver, so this isn’t the venue. What I hope we can all agree on is the notion that DC needs a conservative reset, one that looks to the Constitution as the framework through which we must govern this nation.

Some of the people I’ve been speaking to here are known conservatives. They’re not “RINOs” who campaign on conservative values then lurch left once they’re in office. Despite this, the atmosphere is far more passive than I would have expected. It’s almost as if they’ve given up hope to pass anything meaningful that would limit government, balance the budget, remove the impediments DC has put on business, or attack the national debt. I came very hopeful and, with one more meeting scheduled, feel as if they’re all defeated already. I’m hoping the last meeting with a conservative Congressman will change my view, but right now I’m still befuddled by the defeatist attitude. They feel like they can’t get anything done.

We need a reset, badly. I’m not talking about a mini-Tea-Party revolution that yielded far less than most would admit. I’m not even talking about what Steve Bannon is trying to do to disrupt the system by finding primary opponents for pretty much every Senator up for reelection other than Ted Cruz. What we need is a fundamental change, a new direction that focuses on our nation’s roots within the constraints of the Constitution.

Call this a rant, if you will, but I’m more energized about building a limit-government agenda than I’ve ever been. DC does that to conservatives as long as they’re not exposed to the swamp for too long. I can’t wait to leave, but I know I have to return soon.