Report from Louisiana: Early Prison Release #fail

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Report from Louisiana: Early Prison Release #fail

By: Pat Austin

SHREVE­PORT – Well, that didn’t take long.

Tyrone White, a con­victed car bur­glar who was released early under Louisiana’s new free-​the-​criminals crim­i­nal jus­tice over­all, has been re-​arrested. White was out of jail only five days before he picked up a gun and robbed a con­struc­tion worker in Ken­ner, Louisiana. He is now back in jail.

Louisiana Attor­ney Gen­eral Jeff Landry com­mented:

Gov. (John Bel) Edwards’ staffer, (cor­rec­tions sec­re­tary) James LeBlanc, indi­cated we needed to give the ‘reforms’ time to work,” said the release from Cit­i­zens for Louisiana Job Cre­ators. “Per­haps we could sug­gest that any­one who has SIXTY FOUR counts of bur­glary NOT be set free when Gov­er­nor Edwards and the Depart­ment of Cor­rec­tions decides to let the next batch of 1,500+ crim­i­nals out of jail on Dec. 1.

As we said last week, lock your doors and, as U.S. Sen­a­tor (John) Kennedy has sug­gested, ‘You ought to own a hand­gun just in case.’ ”

Wait, he said sixty-​four counts of burglary?!

Tyrone White has a 40-​page crim­i­nal his­tory in Jef­fer­son Parish alone. Is he an out­lier? Is he an early-​release can­di­date that slipped through the cracks and should never have been released? Who knows. Who knows how many more Tyrone Whites are walk­ing around right now, free, due to this new leg­is­la­tion package?

In the spring, in order to address Louisiana’s high incar­cer­a­tion rate, the Edwards admin­is­tra­tion pushed a sweep­ing crim­i­nal jus­tice reform pack­age:

Most sig­nif­i­cantly, the pack­age of bills aims to over­haul sen­tenc­ing in the state crim­i­nal codes. The pack­age will reduce manda­tory min­i­mums, trim sen­tences and give some inmates access to parole eli­gi­bil­ity sooner. It cre­ates a med­ical fur­lough pro­gram, which allows the sick­est inmates to tem­porar­ily receive treat­ment off site, and be eli­gi­ble for Med­ic­aid, which saves the state on med­ical costs. The pack­age over­hauls drug sen­tenc­ing, allow­ing lighter sen­tences based on weights, and stream­lines the state’s many incon­gru­ous theft penal­ties. One bill in the pack­age will limit how often juve­nile offend­ers can receive life with­out parole sentences.

The mea­sure also expands prison alter­na­tives, like drug court, and expand safety nets for peo­ple get­ting out of jail and return­ing to their com­mu­ni­ties, by reduc­ing their finan­cial bur­dens and help­ing them have bet­ter access to jobs. Another bill will help improve the way vic­tims are noti­fied when offend­ers have parole hear­ings or are released.

In this first wave of early release, nearly 2,000 pris­on­ers were set free. Another wave comes in a cou­ple of weeks.

It is not sur­pris­ing that the law enforce­ment com­mu­nity is unhappy about many of these changes. It means they have to deal with the Tyrone Whites again and again. And some law enforce­ment offi­cials are mak­ing it known that the num­bers of crim­i­nals on early release are much higher than what is being offi­cially reported.

The early release pro­vi­sion indi­cates that “non-​violent offend­ers” are the only pris­on­ers eli­gi­ble for early release. In all like­li­hood, the con­struc­tion worker on the other end of Tyrone White’s gun last week would beg to differ.

There’s noth­ing wrong with crim­i­nal jus­tice reform and truly low level offend­ers per­haps deserve a sec­ond look and a chance of early release. But these can­di­dates must be care­fully screened and eval­u­ated to ensure their chances of suc­cess and assim­i­la­tion back into soci­ety. What tools are we giv­ing them to ensure they can find jobs and avoid recidivism?

Tyrone White won’t be the only one of the early released to return to jail. But per­haps he will serve a cau­tion­ary pur­pose in ensur­ing that those who are released in the com­ing months are given a sec­ond look.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT —  Well, that didn’t take long.

Tyrone White, a convicted car burglar who was released early under Louisiana’s new free-the-criminals criminal justice overall, has been re-arrested.  White was out of jail only five days before he picked up a gun and robbed a construction worker in Kenner, Louisiana.  He is now back in jail.

Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry commented:

“Gov. (John Bel) Edwards’ staffer, (corrections secretary) James LeBlanc, indicated we needed to give the ‘reforms’ time to work,” said the release from Citizens for Louisiana Job Creators. “Perhaps we could suggest that anyone who has SIXTY FOUR counts of burglary NOT be set free when Governor Edwards and the Department of Corrections decides to let the next batch of 1,500+ criminals out of jail on Dec. 1.

“As we said last week, lock your doors and, as U.S. Senator (John) Kennedy has suggested, ‘You ought to own a handgun just in case.’ “

Wait, he said sixty-four counts of burglary?!

Tyrone White has a 40-page criminal history in Jefferson Parish alone.  Is he an outlier?  Is he an early-release candidate that slipped through the cracks and should never have been released?  Who knows.  Who knows how many more Tyrone Whites are walking around right now, free, due to this new legislation package?

In the spring, in order to address Louisiana’s high incarceration rate, the Edwards administration pushed a sweeping criminal justice reform package:

Most significantly, the package of bills aims to overhaul sentencing in the state criminal codes. The package will reduce mandatory minimums, trim sentences and give some inmates access to parole eligibility sooner. It creates a medical furlough program, which allows the sickest inmates to temporarily receive treatment off site, and be eligible for Medicaid, which saves the state on medical costs. The package overhauls drug sentencing, allowing lighter sentences based on weights, and streamlines the state’s many incongruous theft penalties. One bill in the package will limit how often juvenile offenders can receive life without parole sentences.

The measure also expands prison alternatives, like drug court, and expand safety nets for people getting out of jail and returning to their communities, by reducing their financial burdens and helping them have better access to jobs. Another bill will help improve the way victims are notified when offenders have parole hearings or are released.

In this first wave of early release, nearly 2,000 prisoners were set free.  Another wave comes in a couple of weeks.

It is not surprising that the law enforcement community is unhappy about many of these changes.  It means they have to deal with the Tyrone Whites again and again.  And some law enforcement officials are making it known that the numbers of criminals on early release are much higher than what is being officially reported.

The early release provision indicates that “non-violent offenders” are the only prisoners eligible for early release.  In all likelihood, the construction worker on the other end of Tyrone White’s gun last week would beg to differ.

There’s nothing wrong with criminal justice reform and truly low level offenders perhaps deserve a second look and a chance of early release.  But these candidates must be carefully screened and evaluated to ensure their chances of success and assimilation back into society.  What tools are we giving them to ensure they can find jobs and avoid recidivism?

Tyrone White won’t be the only one of the early released to return to jail.  But perhaps he will serve a cautionary purpose in ensuring that those who are released in the coming months are given a second look.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.