Readability

Personal Honor

by baldilocks

One of my friends sur­mises that Pres­i­dent Trump calls Sen­a­tor Eliz­a­beth War­ren (D-​MA) Poc­a­hon­tas because he doesn’t get the Faux­c­a­hon­tas joke that spread all over the con­ser­v­a­tive Inter­net after it was revealed that War­ren had claimed to be part Indian and used it to get a posi­tion at Har­vard. (It was later dis­cov­ered that she has no Indian her­itage and many sus­pect that War­ren knew it all along due to the fact that she stopped men­tion­ing it after she became tenured at Harvard.)

Well, ever since the pres­i­dent dropped the Poc­a­hon­tas bomb – again; he’s been call­ing her that for months – dur­ing a White House cer­e­mony to honor the liv­ing mem­bers of the WWII Navajo Code Talk­ers, there has been a huge dis­cus­sion as to whether the president’s moniker for War­ren was offen­sive or not. Lots of peo­ple put it like this to me: “Would you be offended if he called you Har­riet Tub­man?” Well I don’t know, but since I’m a black Amer­i­can and Tub­man was a black Amer­i­cans hero­ine, I don’t think offense would be my first feel­ing. Con­fu­sion, maybe.

Any­way, that poor anal­ogy shows that, in cases like these, it’s always best to ask a per­son to whom the case applies.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_103102” align=“alignright” width=“150”] Hon­or­able men[/caption]

CNN polit­i­cal ana­lyst Joshua Green met with Thomas Begay – one of the vet­er­ans hon­ored at the event – who said that while he was puz­zled by the com­ment, he was not offended by it.

The Marines made us yell ‘Geron­imo’ when we jumped out of planes, and that didn’t offend me either,” Begay said.

And then there’s this lady:

It turns out that an actual descen­dant of Poc­a­hon­tas does not take any offense to Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump jok­ingly refer­ring to Eliz­a­beth War­ren as “Pocahontas.”

In a Sep­tem­ber inter­view with Sky News, Deb­bie “White Dove” Por­reco said that Trump once asked her if it offended her that he used the name “Poc­a­hon­tas” to refer to the Demo­c­ra­tic senator.

I know that he uses ‘Poc­a­hon­tas’ some­times with Eliz­a­beth War­ren,” Por­reco explained. “He said, ‘well does that offend you when I use that?’ And I told him no, it doesn’t offend me.”’

Por­reco was the model for the ani­mated ver­sion of Pocahontas.

Cer­tainly I’ve read accounts of oth­ers Indi­ans who were offended by the pres­i­dent, and still oth­ers who think that a cer­e­mony to rec­og­nize such hon­or­able Amer­i­cans was not the time to take a jab at a polit­i­cal foe. The lat­ter do have a more legit­i­mate point.

What I do like see­ing demon­strated is that Indi­ans are indi­vid­u­als; not that I didn’t know it, of course. But it’s seem that a lot of other peo­ple who jump to defend oth­ers need to be reminded that most of us can defend our own honor. Or when can decide that our honor doesn’t need defending.

That’s the province of free persons.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel ten­ta­tively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Fol­low her on Twit­ter and on Gab​.ai.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism!

by baldilocks

One of my friends surmises that President Trump calls Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) Pocahontas because he doesn’t get the Fauxcahontas joke that spread all over the conservative Internet after it was revealed that Warren had claimed to be part Indian and used it to get a position at Harvard. (It was later discovered that she has no Indian heritage and many suspect that Warren knew it all along due to the fact that she stopped mentioning it after she became tenured at Harvard.)

Well, ever since the president dropped the Pocahontas bomb  — again; he’s been calling her that for months –  during a White House ceremony to honor the living members of the WWII Navajo Code Talkers, there has been a huge discussion as to whether the president’s moniker for Warren was offensive or not. Lots of people put it like this to me: “Would you be offended if he called you Harriet Tubman?” Well I don’t know, but since I’m a black American and Tubman was a black Americans heroine, I don’t think offense would be my first feeling. Confusion, maybe.

Anyway, that poor analogy shows that, in cases like these, it’s always best to ask a person to whom the case applies.

Honorable men

CNN political analyst Joshua Green met with Thomas Begay – one of the veterans honored at the event – who said that while he was puzzled by the comment, he was not offended by it.

“The Marines made us yell ‘Geronimo’ when we jumped out of planes, and that didn’t offend me either,” Begay said.

And then there’s this lady:

It turns out that an actual descendant of Pocahontas does not take any offense to President Donald Trump jokingly referring to Elizabeth Warren as “Pocahontas.”

In a September interview with Sky News, Debbie “White Dove” Porreco said that Trump once asked her if it offended her that he used the name “Pocahontas” to refer to the Democratic senator.

“I know that he uses ‘Pocahontas’ sometimes with Elizabeth Warren,” Porreco explained. “He said, ‘well does that offend you when I use that?’ And I told him no, it doesn’t offend me.”’

Porreco was the model for the animated version of Pocahontas.

Certainly I’ve read accounts of others Indians who were offended by the president, and still others who think that a ceremony to recognize such honorable Americans was not the time to take a jab at a political foe. The latter do have a more legitimate point.

What I do like seeing demonstrated is that Indians are individuals; not that I didn’t know it, of course. But it’s seem that a lot of other people who jump to defend others need to be reminded that most of us can defend our own honor. Or when can decide that our honor doesn’t need defending.

That’s the province of free persons.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!