The horticulturist in the Google doodle

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The horticulturist in the Google doodle

I’m stay­ing away from most head­lines out of news exhaus­tion, so today I’m post­ing about Gertrude Jekyll (no rela­tion to Robert Lewis Stevenson’s fic­tional doc­tor).

Gertrude, born 174 years ago, was THE gar­den designer of her age,

Born in 1843, Jekyll was a British hor­ti­cul­tur­ist, gar­den designer, artist and writer who cre­ated more than 400 gar­dens in Europe in the US and wrote 15 books and more than 1,000 mag­a­zine arti­cles on gar­den design. To honor Jekyll, described as “a pre­mier influ­ence in gar­den design,” Google cre­ated a lush and col­or­ful land­scape doo­dle Wednes­day to cel­e­brate Jekyll’s con­tri­bu­tion on her 174 birthday.

Her own house, Mun­stead Wood, has a glo­ri­ous gar­den you can read about in Gertrude Jekyll at Mun­stead Wood, which is back in reprint after twenty years (and will make a great hol­i­day or house­warm­ing gift).

The house at Mun­stead Wood was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, who also designed the Lutyens bench (see photo on the right). Jekyll and Lutyens col­lab­o­rated fre­quently over the years, and she had started the 15-​acre gar­den before he designed the Arts and Crafts style house in 1897.

Gertrude had four­teen full-​time gar­den­ers doing the maintenance.

My first trip tp Eng­land, nearly forty years ago, was a pil­grim­age of sorts to locales related to Arts and Crafts, William Mor­ris, and the Pre-​Raphaelites. I didn’t make it to Mun­stead Wood, but did enjoy other breath­tak­ingly beau­ti­ful Jekyll gardens.

In case you won­der, I lack gar­den­ing skills and became even more dis­cour­aged some 25 years or so ago. I bought a dozen hosta for a shady part of the back yard and enthu­si­as­ti­cally spent all day prepar­ing the clay soil and plant­ing them.

The next morn­ing I looked out the win­dow and they were gone.

The deer had eaten them down to the roots.

Gertrude and her four­teen needed a 10′ fence.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog

I’m staying away from most headlines out of news exhaustion, so today I’m posting about Gertrude Jekyll (no relation to Robert Lewis Stevenson’s fictional doctor).

Gertrude, born 174 years ago, was THE garden designer of her age,

Born in 1843, Jekyll was a British horticulturist, garden designer, artist and writer who created more than 400 gardens in Europe in the US and wrote 15 books and more than 1,000 magazine articles on garden design. To honor Jekyll, described as “a premier influence in garden design,” Google created a lush and colorful landscape doodle Wednesday to celebrate Jekyll’s contribution on her 174 birthday.

Her own house, Munstead Wood, has a glorious garden you can read about in Gertrude Jekyll at Munstead Wood, which is back in reprint after twenty years (and will make a great holiday or housewarming gift).

The house at Munstead Wood was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, who also designed the Lutyens bench (see photo on the right). Jekyll and Lutyens collaborated frequently over the years, and she had started the 15-acre garden before he designed the Arts and Crafts style house in 1897.

Gertrude had fourteen full-time gardeners doing the maintenance.

My first trip tp England, nearly forty years ago, was a pilgrimage of sorts to locales related to Arts and Crafts, William Morris, and the Pre-Raphaelites. I didn’t make it to Munstead Wood, but did enjoy other breathtakingly beautiful Jekyll gardens.

In case you wonder, I lack gardening skills and became even more discouraged some 25 years or so ago. I bought a dozen hosta for a shady part of the back yard and enthusiastically spent all day preparing the clay soil and planting them.

The next morning I looked out the window and they were gone.

The deer had eaten them down to the roots.

Gertrude and her fourteen needed a 10′ fence.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog