Readability

Winner Takes All from my porch

I spend most Sat­ur­days (weather allow­ing) at my screened porch, when I’m not doing chores. I was read­ing Robert Bidinotto’s lat­est thriller, Win­ner Takes All, when Juli­ette asked if I could fill in for her today, so here I am, post­ing from the porch.

It’s a beau­ti­ful, quiet, warm (80F, 49% humid­ity) and sunny day in Cen­tral Florida.

And I am thankful.

[I’ve been think­ing a lot about thank­ful­ness recently, not only because of Thanks­giv­ing Day, but also because I’ve come across a per­son or two who spend every wak­ing moment — they really work hard at it — in a pur­pose­ful bad mood. Lest you think I’m char­i­ta­bly inclined, my reac­tion is that of mild annoy­ance alter­nat­ing with feigned indif­fer­ence, since, to para­phrase Dean Wormer, “fat, ornery and stu­pid is no way to go through life.” But I digress.]

Good reads are one of the things I’m thank­ful for.

I highly rec­om­mend Win­ner Takes All. I met Robert Bidinotto years ago at CPAC, before he started writ­ing thrillers. He was already known for his arti­cle “Get­ting Away with Mur­der” in the July 1988 issue of the Reader’s Digest, but I didn’t match the arti­cle with the face until later. The article,

stirred a national con­tro­versy about crime and prison fur­lough pro­grams dur­ing the 1988 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion cam­paign, and it’s widely cred­ited with hav­ing affected the out­come of the election.

It was about Willie Hor­ton.

Robert brings his reporter expe­ri­ences and his writ­ing skills to his nov­els (in order): Hunter, Bad Deeds, and Win­ner Takes All star­ring Dylan Hunter.

You’ll enjoy them for the qual­ity of the writ­ing, the action, the nice details (Robert incor­po­rates the fam­ily of foxes from his real-​life back yard in Win­ner Takes All), and the well-​developed characters.

The only warn­ing (and you may — or not — be thank­ful to hear this in advance) is that the three nov­els are highly addic­tive and you will not want to put them down.

Unless, of course, you have a chance to fill in for Juli­ette. You can help her out with the lap­top repair bills.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog

I spend most Saturdays (weather allowing) at my screened porch, when I’m not doing chores. I was reading Robert Bidinotto’s latest thriller, Winner Takes All, when Juliette asked if I could fill in for her today, so here I am, posting from the porch.

It’s a beautiful, quiet, warm (80F, 49% humidity) and sunny day in Central Florida.

And I am thankful.

[I’ve been thinking a lot about thankfulness recently, not only because of Thanksgiving Day, but also because I’ve come across a person or two who spend every waking moment – they really work hard at it – in a purposeful bad mood. Lest you think I’m charitably inclined, my reaction is that of mild annoyance alternating with feigned indifference, since, to paraphrase Dean Wormer, “fat, ornery and stupid is no way to go through life.” But I digress.]

Good reads are one of the things I’m thankful for.

I highly recommend Winner Takes All. I met Robert Bidinotto years ago at CPAC, before he started writing thrillers. He was already known for his article “Getting Away with Murder” in the July 1988 issue of the Reader’s Digest, but I didn’t match the article with the face until later. The article,

stirred a national controversy about crime and prison furlough programs during the 1988 presidential election campaign, and it’s widely credited with having affected the outcome of the election.

It was about Willie Horton.

Robert brings his reporter experiences and his writing skills to his novels (in order): Hunter, Bad Deeds, and Winner Takes All starring Dylan Hunter.

You’ll enjoy them for the quality of the writing, the action, the nice details (Robert incorporates the family of foxes from his real-life back yard in Winner Takes All), and the well-developed characters.

The only warning (and you may – or not – be thankful to hear this in advance) is that the three novels are highly addictive and you will not want to put them down.

Unless, of course, you have a chance to fill in for Juliette. You can help her out with the laptop repair bills.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog