I’m Old Enough to Remember When Racist Democrats Were the Biggest Backers of Separate But Equal for Blacks…

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I'm Old Enough to Remember When Racist Democrats Were the Biggest Backers of Separate But Equal for Blacks...

It was the end of our base­ball, but who cares?

Buck O’Neil

…and it looks like at Ever­green Col­lege they’re still all for it:

The stu­dent news­pa­per at Ever­green State Col­lege has a sec­tion in its opin­ion pages described as “for peo­ple of color by peo­ple of color.”

This should be a place where we can be us with­out it being over­shad­owed by the dark cloud that is liv­ing under white supremacy and hav­ing to see things from a white perspective.

Of course I’m being a lit­tle hard on Ever­green, all over the lib­eral col­le­gian world Democ­rats are dis­cov­er­ing the joys of seg­re­ga­tion and sep­a­rate but equal and declar­ing any­one who doesn’t agree with them beyond contempt.

It reminds me of this descrip­tion of the Movie Birth of a Nation (1915) by the late Roger Ebert:

Watch­ing them today, we are appalled. But audi­ences in 1915 were wit­ness­ing the inven­tion of inter­cut­ting in a chase scene. Noth­ing like it had ever been seen before: Par­al­lel action build­ing to a sus­pense cli­max. Do you think they were think­ing about black­face? They were thrilled out of their minds.

Today, what they saw for the first time, we can­not see at all. Grif­fith assem­bled and per­fected the early dis­cov­er­ies of film lan­guage, and his cin­e­matic tech­niques that have influ­enced the visual strate­gies of vir­tu­ally every film made since; they have become so famil­iar we are not even aware of them. We, on the other hand, are aston­ished by racist atti­tudes that were equally invis­i­ble to most white audi­ences in 1915.

If that movie was made today that scene wouldn’t be there because the mod­ern col­lege SJW’s would have already exco­ri­ated the black man inter­ested in a white woman as a trai­tor to his race.

To the lib­eral of 1955 or 1963 or even 1915 the idea of sep­a­rate but equal was an abom­i­na­tion designed to keep Amer­i­can Blacks from fully becom­ing part of Amer­i­can soci­ety, cul­ture and suc­cess. To the Demo­c­rat party of that time, it was, like slav­ery before it, a means to main­tain power and con­trol. That the Demo­c­rat party of 2017 is argu­ing for the same cul­tural sep­a­ra­tion that they were 100 years ago in the hey­day of Jim Crow and that many of those Democ­rats argu­ing for it are black Democ­rats who are so excited at the prospect of poten­tial power that they don’t see the bla­tant racism in their actions is an irony so deep that any­one with the small­est grasp of his­tory can barely wrap one’s head around it.

It was the end of our baseball, but who cares?

Buck O’Neil

…and it looks like at Evergreen College they’re still all for it:

The student newspaper at Evergreen State College has a section in its opinion pages described as “for people of color by people of color.”

“This should be a place where we can be us without it being overshadowed by the dark cloud that is living under white supremacy and having to see things from a white perspective.

Of course I’m being a little hard on Evergreen, all over the liberal collegian world Democrats are discovering the joys of segregation and separate but equal and declaring anyone who doesn’t agree with them beyond contempt.

It reminds me of this description of the Movie Birth of a Nation (1915) by the late Roger Ebert:

Watching them today, we are appalled. But audiences in 1915 were witnessing the invention of intercutting in a chase scene. Nothing like it had ever been seen before: Parallel action building to a suspense climax. Do you think they were thinking about blackface? They were thrilled out of their minds.

Today, what they saw for the first time, we cannot see at all. Griffith assembled and perfected the early discoveries of film language, and his cinematic techniques that have influenced the visual strategies of virtually every film made since; they have become so familiar we are not even aware of them. We, on the other hand, are astonished by racist attitudes that were equally invisible to most white audiences in 1915.

If that movie was made today that scene wouldn’t be there because the modern college SJW’s would have already excoriated the black man interested in a white woman as a traitor to his race.

To the liberal of 1955 or 1963 or even 1915 the idea of separate but equal was an abomination designed to keep American Blacks from fully becoming part of American society, culture and success. To the Democrat party of that time, it was, like slavery before it, a means to maintain power and control. That the Democrat party of 2017 is arguing for the same cultural separation that they were 100 years ago in the heyday of Jim Crow and that many of those Democrats arguing for it are black Democrats who are so excited at the prospect of potential power that they don’t see the blatant racism in their actions is an irony so deep that anyone with the smallest grasp of history can barely wrap one’s head around it.