Review: Kathryrn Bigelow’s “Detroit”

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Review: Kathryrn Bigelow's "Detroit"

By John Ruberry

I was out of town in July when Detroit, the movie about the destruc­tive 1967 riot and a police attack on a small group of guests at the Algiers Motel, hit the the­aters. Directed by Kathryrn Bigelow, who is best known for Zero Dark Thirty and the Acad­emy Award-​winning The Hurt Locker, is again teamed with scriptwriter Mark Boal. It stars John Borega, renowned for his role in the Star Wars reboot, as a torn African-​American, who despite good inten­tions gets pulled into the car­nage and the after­math of the upheaval.

But by the time I got back home and found the time to see Detroit it was gone from the­aters. Even before the Har­vey Weinstein-​ignited sex scan­dals, 2017 was an annus hor­ri­bilis for Hol­ly­wood. Yes, Won­der Woman and Beauty and the Beast were tremen­dous hits, there were many notable flops, and among them was Detroit. That’s a pity because it is a mas­ter­ful piece of filmmaking.

Last night I watched it by way of OnDe­mand on Xfinity.

The 1967 Detroit Riot is the demar­ca­tion line in his­tory for that city, just as the Potato Famine is for Ire­land and the defeat of the Armada is for Spain. It’s the Motor City’s before-​and-​after moment. “Ah, but that was before the riot,” or “riots,” some­times the plural form is used, is some­thing all Detroi­ters of a cer­tain age say. Prior to the riot Detroit was America’s fifth-​largest city, but now, for the first time since 1850, Detroit is not among America’s twenty-​most pop­u­lous cities. In 1950 Detroit was America’s most pros­per­ous munic­i­pal­ity, now it is one of its poor­est. True, Detroit’s prob­lems were evi­dent in the 1950s and early 1960s, but at the time the few peo­ple pay­ing atten­tion to such things viewed that period as a rough patch or per­haps noth­ing more than a mod­est tran­si­tional period.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_103733” align=“alignleft” width=“300”] Fox The­atre one month ago[/caption]

The world pre­mière of Detroit took place at the Fox The­atre two days after the 50th anniver­sary of the start of the riot, the old movie palace is the set­ting of one of the scenes in the movie. The film begins with an under­manned police raid of a black-​run speakeasy – called a “blind pig” in Detroit – that quickly turns into a wide­spread tumult of loot­ing, arson, and death. Archival news footage shows the deves­ta­tion fol­lowed by a clip of Gov­er­nor George Rom­ney, Mitt’s father, announc­ing that the Michi­gan National Guard has been called out. By the end of the five-​day riot Michi­gan state troop­ers and fed­eral troops had been dis­patched to Detroit as well.

Among the riot scenes is one with now-​disgraced US Rep. John Cony­ers (Laz Alonso) urg­ing a crowd for calm – they ignore him. Five months ago Cony­ers was still a civil rights icon. Now Cony­ers is shunned.

But most of the movie is cen­tered on police tor­ment­ing sus­pects and wit­nesses at the Algiers, the reputed site of a sniper attack. After a per­for­mance by the Dra­mat­ics – who later gained fame for the hit “Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get,” one of the group’s mem­bers, Larry Reid (Algee Smith), along with his per­sonal assis­tant, take refuge at the Algiers, which is located just out­side of the Vir­ginia Park neigh­bor­hood, the heart of the riot zone. For a while it seems that despite the haze of the smoke from the arson fires and the con­stant sirens, the Algiers is the smart choice to have a party while Detroit burns. That is until an evil Detroit police offi­cer, Philip Krauss (Will Poul­ter), his two racist part­ners, troops from the National Guard, and Melvin Dis­mukes (Borega), a secu­rity guard, storm the Algiers in search of a sniper, who we know is Carl Cooper (Jason Mitchell), who sim­ply but reck­lessly fired a track and field start­ing pis­tol. What fol­lows is a series of intense torture-​filled series of inter­ro­ga­tions. Two young white pros­ti­tutes, one of them is por­trayed by Han­nah Mur­phy, who plays Gilly in Game of Thrones, are among those brutalized.

I’m just gonna assume you’re all crim­i­nals,” Krauss tells them. One of those “crim­i­nals” is Robert Greene (Anthony Mackie), a Viet­nam vet­eran who came to Detroit like hun­dreds of thou­sand of oth­ers before him – he is sim­ply look­ing for work. Don’t for­get, the blind pig raid busted up a party wel­com­ing two other Viet­nam vets home. Krauss den­i­grates Greene, says he “prob­a­bly just drove a sup­ply truck” while serv­ing and accuses of him of being the pimp for the prostitutes.

Later Krauss asks the women, “Aren’t you ashamed of your­selves, hav­ing sex with n*ggers?” The other pros­ti­tute replies, “It’s 1967, a**hole.” But the mix­ing of blacks and whites was still a prob­lem for many 50 years ago.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_103734” align=“alignright” width=“225”] Blog­ger at the site of where the riot started[/caption]

Finally and trag­i­cally the Algiers inci­dent ends but the legal ram­i­fi­ca­tions please few. Cony­ers appears again. And one of the char­ac­ters finds deliverance.

Like Zero Dark Thirty, the feel­ing of Detroit is claus­tro­pho­bic, which of course is inten­tional. The light­ing isn’t per­fect, that approach undoubt­edly was cho­sen to enmesh Bigelow’s scenes with the archive footage.

Under­stand­ably Detroit is still com­ing to terms with the ’67 riot. I vis­ited Vir­ginia Park last month, while there are still many aban­doned homes – this is Detroit after all – there are some new ones too. The site of the long-​ago razed blind pig and the neigh­bor­ing stores where the riot broke out is now a park – albeit one that no chil­dren were play­ing in. To be fair it was a chilly autumn after­noon. In July a Michi­gan his­tor­i­cal marker was erected at that site. On the flip­side, sand­wiched between New Cen­ter and the man­sions of Boston-​Edison, where Henry Ford, Ty Cobb, Joe Louis, and Berry Gordy once lived, Vir­ginia Park’s future appears bright. Deliv­er­ance may be com­ing there soon too.

Besides Xfin­ity OnDe­mand, Detroit is also avail­able on DVD. The trailer is view­able here.

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

By John Ruberry

I was out of town in July when Detroit, the movie about the destructive 1967 riot and a police attack on a small group of guests at the Algiers Motel, hit the theaters. Directed by Kathryrn Bigelow, who is best known for Zero Dark Thirty and the Academy Award-winning The Hurt Locker, is again teamed with scriptwriter Mark Boal. It stars John Borega, renowned for his role in the Star Wars reboot, as a torn African-American, who despite good intentions gets pulled into the carnage and the aftermath of the upheaval.

But by the time I got back home and found the time to see Detroit it was gone from theaters. Even before the Harvey Weinstein-ignited sex scandals, 2017 was an annus horribilis for Hollywood. Yes, Wonder Woman and Beauty and the Beast were tremendous hits, there were many notable flops, and among them was Detroit. That’s a pity because it is a masterful piece of filmmaking.

Last night I watched it by way of OnDemand on Xfinity.

The 1967 Detroit Riot is the demarcation line in history for that city, just as the Potato Famine is for Ireland and the defeat of the Armada is for Spain. It’s the Motor City’s before-and-after moment. “Ah, but that was before the riot,” or “riots,” sometimes the plural form is used, is something all Detroiters of a certain age say. Prior to the riot Detroit was America’s fifth-largest city, but now, for the first time since 1850, Detroit is not among America’s twenty-most populous cities. In 1950 Detroit was America’s most prosperous municipality, now it is one of its poorest. True, Detroit’s problems were evident in the 1950s and early 1960s, but at the time the few people paying attention to such things viewed that period as a rough patch or perhaps nothing more than a modest transitional period.

Fox Theatre one month ago

The world premiere of Detroit took place at the Fox Theatre two days after the 50th anniversary of the start of the riot, the old movie palace is the setting of one of the scenes in the movie. The film begins with an undermanned police raid of a black-run speakeasy–called a “blind pig” in Detroit–that quickly turns into a widespread tumult of looting, arson, and death. Archival news footage shows the devestation followed by a clip of Governor George Romney, Mitt’s father, announcing that the Michigan National Guard has been called out. By the end of the five-day riot Michigan state troopers and federal troops had been dispatched to Detroit as well.

Among the riot scenes is one with now-disgraced US Rep. John Conyers (Laz Alonso) urging a crowd for calm–they ignore him. Five months ago Conyers was still a civil rights icon. Now Conyers is shunned.

But most of the movie is centered on police tormenting suspects and witnesses at the Algiers, the reputed site of a sniper attack. After a performance by the Dramatics–who later gained fame for the hit “Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get,” one of the group’s members, Larry Reid (Algee Smith), along with his personal assistant, take refuge at the Algiers, which is located just outside of the Virginia Park neighborhood, the heart of the riot zone. For a while it seems that despite the haze of the smoke from the arson fires and the constant sirens, the Algiers is the smart choice to have a party while Detroit burns. That is until an evil Detroit police officer, Philip Krauss (Will Poulter), his two racist partners, troops from the National Guard, and Melvin Dismukes (Borega), a security guard, storm the Algiers in search of a sniper, who we know is Carl Cooper (Jason Mitchell), who simply but recklessly fired a track and field starting pistol. What follows is a series of intense torture-filled series of interrogations. Two young white prostitutes, one of them is portrayed by Hannah Murphy, who plays Gilly in Game of Thrones, are among those brutalized.

“I’m just gonna assume you’re all criminals,” Krauss tells them. One of those “criminals” is Robert Greene (Anthony Mackie), a Vietnam veteran who came to Detroit like hundreds of thousand of others before him–he is simply looking for work. Don’t forget, the blind pig raid busted up a party welcoming two other Vietnam vets home. Krauss denigrates Greene, says he “probably just drove a supply truck” while serving and accuses of him of being the pimp for the prostitutes.

Later Krauss asks the women, “Aren’t you ashamed of yourselves, having sex with n*ggers?” The other prostitute replies, “It’s 1967, a**hole.” But the mixing of blacks and whites was still a problem for many 50 years ago.

Blogger at the site of where the riot started

Finally and tragically the Algiers incident ends but the legal ramifications please few. Conyers appears again. And one of the characters finds deliverance.

Like Zero Dark Thirty, the feeling of Detroit is claustrophobic, which of course is intentional. The lighting isn’t perfect, that approach undoubtedly was chosen to enmesh Bigelow’s scenes with the archive footage.

Understandably Detroit is still coming to terms with the ’67 riot. I visited Virginia Park last month, while there are still many abandoned homes–this is Detroit after all–there are some new ones too. The site of the long-ago razed blind pig and the neighboring stores where the riot broke out is now a park–albeit one that no children were playing in. To be fair it was a chilly autumn afternoon. In July a Michigan historical marker was erected at that site. On the flipside, sandwiched between New Center and the mansions of Boston-Edison, where Henry Ford, Ty Cobb, Joe Louis, and Berry Gordy once lived, Virginia Park’s future appears bright. Deliverance may be coming there soon too.

Besides Xfinity OnDemand, Detroit is also available on DVD. The trailer is viewable here.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.