by baldilocks

At the New York Post, Jay Cost talks about why he’s considering giving up watching the NFL; mostly about officiating and “freak” injuries.

It’s not that much of an interesting read, but it made me think about the time that I almost became one of those women.

12-year- old me to my dad: “I hate football.”

Dad: “How can you hate something you know nothing about?”

Long before I met the man who became my dad when he married my mom, Dad was a tall — 6’4″ — lanky  teenager who played football and basketball in high school and in college. He says he was better at basketball, but that he enjoyed playing football more.

Later, like almost everyone else’s dad, he’d be in front of the TV on Sundays. This was before he became a Christian and, after that, a pastor.

By the time Dad asked me that fateful question, I was beginning to parrot what I’d heard adult females say, even though I don’t remember if Mom ever gave her opinion on the game. I do know that she wasn’t watching it.

My parents had spotty success with getting me to do what they wanted using threats or shame, but they could almost always manipulate me with logic. So, when Dad asked me The Question, I was forced to conclude that he was right: that I could not come to a valid conclusion about the quality of football because I didn’t know jack about it.

To remedy this, Dad suggested that I join him in front of the TV each Sunday for one season, while he explained the goal, strategies, rules, tactics, etc. of the game, and then, afterward, make an informed opinion about the game.

By the end of that season and for many years afterward, I was a big fan of football and the NFL. Then something happened; something long before Colin Kaepernick first knelt during a rendering of the National Anthem.

I got tired of football players and their off-the-field antics. I think Rae Carruth was the death knell – in more ways than one. Kaepernick was the cremation.

Something that has always been an aversion to me is ingratitude for the blessings which God bestows, whatever the nature of that blessing: intellect, physical gifts, earthly opportunities, etc. I’ve only been able to articulate this aversion in recent years, but it has always been there as nebulous, un-evaluated disgust. And, as the character quality of NFL players seemed to descend, my interest in being entertained by them varied directly. (The same thing happened with the NBA; I stopped watching them even earlier.)

The future LA Stadium in the Rams’ and Chargers’ dreams

But now that I’ve evaluated that disgust, I do wonder how long the NFL will last, considering that I’m far from alone

in turning my back on the NFL, if all the empty stadiums and the losses incurred by ESPN, etc. are indications. Here in LA, we have two football teams that can barely sell its dirt-cheap tickets.

Back to Dad. As I said, he long ago readjusted his Sunday priorities – and so did I. It’s for the best.

One wonders what an NFL-less America would look like.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!

Right about the same time as the new National Security Strategy was released, the Navy put out the Strategic Readiness Review, an in-depth look into what caused the basic seamanship problems out in Seventh Fleet. The review is a good read, detailing how we went from an over 500 ship Navy that couldn’t be touched to the less than 300 ships today that attempt to perform the same missions in a significantly more complex environment. The review says that the Navy needs more Sailors, of higher quality that are better trained.

Yet only a week later, we have the same Navy announcing that it is relaxing the physical fitness standards. Sailors can now fail the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) multiple times, and while they won’t be advanced, they won’t get kicked out either.

Lest anyone think the PRT standards are super hard, you can see the 30-34 year old male standards here. Doing a minimum of 44 curlups, 35 pushups and running 1.5 miles in about 14 minutes is not that hard.

So what gives? It seems a bit like mixed messages.

Continue reading “Mixed messages from the Navy”

Democrats nationally might still be in denial over the Trump Tax plan but I can name two countries that aren’t.  One is Australia: .

Australia must follow the United States in slashing corporate tax rates or risk losing jobs and investment to other parts of the world, the country’s top economic ministers have warned.

The federal government is restating its pitch to reduce the company tax rate for all businesses from 30 per cent to 25 per cent after similar moves in the US.

and the other Germany:

“The sharp reduction in the corporate tax rate will give the US a massive competitive advantage,” said Christoph Spengel, the corporate tax expert at the Center for European Economic Research in Mannheim. “Tax competition will get a new dimension with Europeans forced to compete among themselves.”

Wouldn’t it be something if the Trump Tax Law drops taxes worldwide and creates a global boom instead of just a US one?