Trump: A View From Across The Pond

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Trump: A View From Across The Pond

It’s not easy to find a hard­core Trump sup­porter in Lon­don and Paris, but there is a grudg­ing acknowl­edge­ment that the pres­i­dent isn’t as bad as many Amer­i­cans think.

Dur­ing a recent visit to the not-​so-​united United King­dom and France, almost every­where I went peo­ple noticed my accent and wanted to talk about Trump. I didn’t hide my sup­port. What was amaz­ing was that Brits and French actu­ally lis­tened to my point of view — some­thing that rarely hap­pens in the United States.

A for­mer British diplo­mat and his wife, who worked as a jour­nal­ist, can’t believe the impor­tance given to the Michael Wolff book on the Trump admin­is­tra­tion. Such tales wouldn’t appear in much of the respectable press in Britain.

More­over, they see the press fail­ing apart with its con­stant attacks on Trump, los­ing any sense of cred­i­bil­ity on many mat­ters. The cou­ple sub­scribes to The New York Times, but they find it appalling how pol­i­tics have crept into the Gray Old Lady.

I don’t care what the opin­ion writ­ers say. They don’t have to be fair. But opin­ions are con­stantly creep­ing into the news pages,” the for­mer diplo­mat said. His wife said she’s tired of the news orga­ni­za­tion look­ing at every­thing through the lens of Trump. More­over, DaTimes has moved way left of cen­ter when it comes to social issues such as transgenderism.

Another friend, who also served in the British For­eign Ser­vice, noted that the Amer­i­cans are lucky that they are unrav­el­ing Oba­macare. In the United King­dom, for exam­ple, the nation­al­ized health ser­vice announced that all non­emer­gency surg­eries were can­celed this month because of a short­age of cash.

A long­time friend who’s an expert on the Mid­dle East lauded Trump for cut­ting off aid to Pak­istan because of its ties to ter­ror­ism. A retired French banker, who is Jew­ish, praised the deci­sion to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, while a long­time Arab friend disagreed.

A Lon­don cab­bie said he under­stood why Amer­i­cans turned against Hillary and voted for Don­ald. “The elites have ruined the States and Eng­land,” he said. “Now it’s time for oth­ers to try to put things right.”

What was most impor­tant was how I could actu­ally have a con­ver­sa­tion about Trump rather than a shout­ing match. It’s one of the first times in months that I felt com­fort­able about stat­ing my views in pub­lic with such a cross-​section of peo­ple. It’s odd to have to travel out­side of the United States to have a civil discussion.

It’s not easy to find a hardcore Trump supporter in London and Paris, but there is a grudging acknowledgement that the president isn’t as bad as many Americans think.

During a recent visit to the not-so-united United Kingdom and France, almost everywhere I went people noticed my accent and wanted to talk about Trump. I didn’t hide my support. What was amazing was that Brits and French actually listened to my point of view—something that rarely happens in the United States.

A former British diplomat and his wife, who worked as a journalist, can’t believe the importance given to the Michael Wolff book on the Trump administration. Such tales wouldn’t appear in much of the respectable press in Britain.

Moreover, they see the press failing apart with its constant attacks on Trump, losing any sense of credibility on many matters. The couple subscribes to The New York Times, but they find it appalling how politics have crept into the Gray Old Lady.

“I don’t care what the opinion writers say. They don’t have to be fair. But opinions are constantly creeping into the news pages,” the former diplomat said. His wife said she’s tired of the news organization looking at everything through the lens of Trump. Moreover, DaTimes has moved way left of center when it comes to social issues such as transgenderism.

Another friend, who also served in the British Foreign Service, noted that the Americans are lucky that they are unraveling Obamacare. In the United Kingdom, for example, the nationalized health service announced that all nonemergency surgeries were canceled this month because of a shortage of cash.

A longtime friend who’s an expert on the Middle East lauded Trump for cutting off aid to Pakistan because of its ties to terrorism. A retired French banker, who is Jewish, praised the decision to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, while a longtime Arab friend disagreed.

A London cabbie said he understood why Americans turned against Hillary and voted for Donald. “The elites have ruined the States and England,” he said. “Now it’s time for others to try to put things right.”

What was most important was how I could actually have a conversation about Trump rather than a shouting match. It’s one of the first times in months that I felt comfortable about stating my views in public with such a cross-section of people. It’s odd to have to travel outside of the United States to have a civil discussion.