Your lyin’ eyes UPDATED

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Your lyin' eyes UPDATED

Back in 1950 Akira Kuro­sawa made Rashomon, IMDB as describes the plot,

A heinous crime and its after­math are recalled from dif­fer­ing points of view.

Thus, the Rashomon effect,

The Rashomon effect occurs when the same event is given con­tra­dic­tory inter­pre­ta­tions by dif­fer­ent indi­vid­u­als involved. The effect is named after Akira Kuro­sawa’s 1950 film Rashomon, in which a mur­der is described in four mutu­ally con­tra­dic­tory ways by its four wit­nesses.[1] More broadly, the term addresses the moti­va­tions, mech­a­nism, and occur­rences of the report­ing on the cir­cum­stance, and so addresses con­tested inter­pre­ta­tions of events, the exis­tence of dis­agree­ments regard­ing the evi­dence of events, and the sub­jects of sub­jec­tiv­ity ver­sus objec­tiv­ity in human per­cep­tion, mem­ory, and reporting.

We live in Rashomon times.

On the one hand, there’s the Wolff book, where the author admits he’s lying (empha­sis added):

Wolff’s sourc­ing note in an excerpt explains many of the myr­iad inac­cu­ra­cies, say­ing, “Many of the accounts of what has hap­pened in the Trump White House are in con­flict with one another; many, in Trumpian fash­ion, are baldly untrue. These con­flicts, and that loose­ness with the truth, if not with real­ity itself, are an ele­men­tal thread of the book.”

Anti-​trumpers aim­ing to throw Pres. Trump out of office through a “25th Amend­ment solu­tion” by declar­ing him men­tally incom­pe­tent are rely­ing in this book’s anecdotes.

On the other hand, there’s yesterday’s meet­ing, aired live for the full 55 min­utes. Some things you need to see for your­self, so I encour­age you to watch,

Try, if you may, to focus on not on what was said, but on how he man­aged the meet­ing:

He invited nearly every­one at the table to have their say. He urged bipar­ti­san coop­er­a­tion, promis­ing to sign what­ever bill Con­gress brings him.

He joked, lis­tened, accepted flat­tery, told anec­dotes and presided over a pos­i­tive tone on an issue that has eluded a leg­isla­tive solu­tion for a decade or more.

Call it polit­i­cal the­ater, if you may, but, as I tweeted yesterday,

https://​plat​form​.twit​ter​.com/​w​i​d​g​e​ts.js

Check out the reac­tions to that tweet.

Wolff could ask, ‘Whom do you believe, your eyes or my words?’ ” By now even CNN is skep­ti­cal.

Kuro­sawa would have had mate­r­ial for a great movie.

UPDATE
Michael Knowles high­lights what Pres. Trump was doing dur­ing the meet­ing. Pay attention,

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog

Back in 1950 Akira Kurosawa made Rashomon, IMDB as describes the plot,

A heinous crime and its aftermath are recalled from differing points of view.

Thus, the Rashomon effect,

The Rashomon effect occurs when the same event is given contradictory interpretations by different individuals involved. The effect is named after Akira Kurosawa‘s 1950 film Rashomon, in which a murder is described in four mutually contradictory ways by its four witnesses.[1] More broadly, the term addresses the motivations, mechanism, and occurrences of the reporting on the circumstance, and so addresses contested interpretations of events, the existence of disagreements regarding the evidence of events, and the subjects of subjectivity versus objectivity in human perception, memory, and reporting.

We live in Rashomon times.

On the one hand, there’s the Wolff book, where the author admits he’s lying (emphasis added):

Wolff’s sourcing note in an excerpt explains many of the myriad inaccuracies, saying, “Many of the accounts of what has happened in the Trump White House are in conflict with one another; many, in Trumpian fashion, are baldly untrue. These conflicts, and that looseness with the truth, if not with reality itself, are an elemental thread of the book.”

Anti-trumpers aiming to throw Pres. Trump out of office through a “25th Amendment solution” by declaring him mentally incompetent are relying in this book’s anecdotes.

On the other hand, there’s yesterday’s meeting, aired live for the full 55 minutes. Some things you need to see for yourself, so I encourage you to watch,

Try, if you may, to focus on not on what was said, but on how he managed the meeting:

He invited nearly everyone at the table to have their say. He urged bipartisan cooperation, promising to sign whatever bill Congress brings him.
. . .
He joked, listened, accepted flattery, told anecdotes and presided over a positive tone on an issue that has eluded a legislative solution for a decade or more.

Call it political theater, if you may, but, as I tweeted yesterday,

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Check out the reactions to that tweet.

Wolff could ask, ‘Whom do you believe, your eyes or my words?’ “ By now even CNN is skeptical.

Kurosawa would have had material for a great movie.

UPDATE
Michael Knowles highlights what Pres. Trump was doing during the meeting. Pay attention,

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U. S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog