That more than anything else is why the Democrats in the audience are so upset. Or to put it another way, when even CBS starts tweeting stuff about this.

Finally a thought on CNN we are already hearing as of 10:33 about Russia interfering in the midterms apparently this is the planned talking point when they fail to take the house

Update: 90 minutes of optimism from Donald Trump. Now pessimism pessimism pessimism from Joe Kennedy boy that’s going to sell real well in election 2018. Only a Massachusetts audience could be clapping for it.

Update 2: Don Surber gets it

In the many, many guest mentions, Trump allowed the American people to tell Congress what the State of the Union is.

He was compassionate, on-target, and articulate.

People keep saying Trump needs to act presidential.

Tonight he was.

Update 3: Powerline gets it.

Equally dismal was when almost all the Democrats refused to stand in response to Trump’s statement that we should all rise for the National Anthem. Here, and repeatedly through the evening, the Democrats were playing to a very small audience. Their audience probably got even smaller when they were seen fiddling with their cell phones.

Immigration was naturally a significant topic. Trump began, shrewdly, by emphasizing security and the vicious MS-13 gang, which largely hushed the illegal immigrants who had been invited into the chamber by Democrats. Perhaps the speech’s most controversial moment was when Trump said that his compromise immigration proposal includes eventual citizenship–not just legalization–for nearly two million illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as minors.

Troubling as that may be for many conservatives, the sight of Cory Booker and other Democrats sitting stone-faced when the president said we need a merit-based immigration system was a forceful reminder of how bad the alternative to the Trump administration is.

On foreign policy, President Trump was appropriately strong. Throughout the speech, he talked about guests who were heroic in various ways. This has become a tradition, but I don’t think I have seen it done more effectively than Trump did it tonight. The final guest was a North Korean escapee who waved his crutches to the cheering crowd. I think even the Democrats may have been on their feet for that one.

All in all, it was a terrific night for the good guys. Trump’s performance tonight was a reminder that his predecessor was not a very good public speaker. He never succeeded in stirring an audience as Trump did tonight. The Democrats can only hope that not a lot of swing voters were watching.

Update 4: There is no Update four!

Update 5: Comfortably smug gets it

Update 6: Chuck Todd doesn’t get it. “It’s hard to judge these speeches because we know it’s not him.” He’s actually arguing right now at 11:16 PM that he didn’t sound authentically Trump

Update 7: Now Andrea Mitchel is making the “Russia interfering in election 2018” We are now in the official meme of the Democrat to explain their defeat.

Update 8: The reason why the left is so upset via @CBSNEWS and @yougov

Democrats on twitter hardest hit

Update 9: Now you know why Democrats are crying: Russia Russia Russia!

and the Obama contrast via the daily caller and Drudge

A review of the president’s prepared remarks by The Daily Caller reveals he used the word “we” more than four times as many times as he said the word “I.”

President Trump used the word “I” 29 times in his speech, while using “we” 129 times. Another communal word used often by the president: “our,” which he used 104 times.

Update 10: Joy Reid doesn’t get it

Rick Santorum does “He was talking to the common man and…used examples and real people”. Notes that people watching will see that he’s not what the left has portrayed him for a year

Update 11: Hitting the sack but lets give the last words to John Sexton at Hotair who contrasts the Trump speech with the Kennedy response:

As for the speech itself, I heard someone on TV describe it as “dark” and that was my impression too. Kennedy’s vision of American bordered on dystopian at times. Where Trump was optimistic about our economy and our future as a nation, Kennedy seemed to deliver a message to a resistance that sees mostly cause for concern in America. I found it off-putting, but then I wasn’t the target audience. I’m sure this went over great with some Democrats.

And that’s the real secret here, Kennedy, MSNBC and Bernie Sanders were all speaking to their niche audiences. Like the opening speech of his campaign Trump wasn’t talking to the pundits or hoping for their approval he was talking to the public in general who understand exactly what he is saying. That’s why he’ll win.

Update 12 (the morning after)

Stacy McCain gets it:

Americans are dreamers, but Democrats were having their worst nightmare. Nancy Pelosi spent the night glum-faced, evidently fidgeting with her dentures, and one Democrat, Rep. Luis Gutierrez, walked out of the speech when Republicans began chanting, “USA! USA! USA!”

and he links to this tweet of a poll showing that while CNN doesn’t get it the people they polled did

and at PJ media Liz gets it as well: (emphasis mine)

My hot take: I thought the speech was very positive and “pro-America.” The President’s guests at the speech were a great way to tell the story he wanted to tell. The Democrats looked like sour pusses and bitchy babies but that’s no surprise since their political position is to sell misery and discord. Naturally, they revile the positive messages about America coming from the President. Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-MA), delivered the official response and was inexplicably put in front of a car which is a bad look for a Kennedy. Putting a rich white liberal from New England top respond to the SOTU is a funny way to win back the working class Americans that ditched the Dems in 2016, but whatever. The audience noticed he was slobbering or had abused his chapstick to the point of distraction. His response was dark and morose.

On the bright side for the left as a twitter wag noted yesterday a Kennedy was put in front of car and everyone made it out alive.

Update 13: Not surprisingly the ACLU doesn’t get it

Oh, the vapors!

ACLU Complains: Trump Said ‘America’ More Than 80 Times in His Speech; It’s ‘Exclusionary.’

Really. This is a thing the AMERICAN Civil Liberties Union is complaining happened during a speech about America.

Tonight, President Trump said the word ‘America’ more than 80 times in his speech. Yet, after a divisive first year, we hear and feel how exclusionary that ‘America’ is, with policies that have harmed so many vulnerable American communities. The ACLU stands ready to protect these communities, both in the courts and at the polls.

Maybe they should replace the A in ACLU with a different A-word.

Ever notice how the people claim to be offended by “America” or chants of “USA”  never wonder why people want to stay here?


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Finally might I suggest my book  Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift.

by baldilocks

Are the days of the famous University of Notre Dame mascot numbered? Some dude at ESPN hopes so.

During a debate Tuesday over the Cleveland Indian’s recent decision to drop their “Chief Wahoo” logo, ESPN “First Take” host Max Kellerman argued the Notre Dame Fighting Irish mascot is offensive as well.

Kellerman said he is personally thanked every time he visits a reservation for his public opposition to Native-American mascots in sports.

“When I go to Native-American reservations around the country to call fights, I am approached—I’ve received feathers [Ed.: really?] in honor and letters saying, ‘Thank you for your stance,'” he said.

Based on that anecdotal evidence, he dismissed a Washington Post survey that found nine out of 10 Native-Americans are not offended by team names like the NFL’s Washington Redskins. (…)

“Many Irish-Americans are not offended, but many are. And should that also change? The answer is yes, unequivocally yes,” Kellerman said, as his guest Will Cain groaned and facepalmed.

I’m with ya, Will.

As an honorary holder of the Irish Card – it’s the O thing – I have permission to speak on this: are you fecking kidding? Some of my best friends are straight-from-the island Irish! (Yes, I played that card, too.) I can’t wait to tell them about it. They will laugh their butts off.

Back when the Redskins were under fire for their mascot, someone asked me what I would do if a professional sports team decided to change its mascot to, say, the New England Zulu Nation.

Answer: buy a jersey.

All cheekiness aside, this is getting out of hand.

Next? To name a few …

Boston Celtics.

Minnesota Vikings.

New York Yankees.

My high school alma mater, the LA Romans. /gratuitous

And, definitely the LA Raiders and the Pittsburg Pirates. Pirates were and are often Muslim.

Watch and see.

(Thanks to Ed Driscoll)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!

Like almost everything, the Super Bowl has become as much a political event as a game.

DaTimes’ Frank Bruni, one of the most leftist columnists at the newspaper, has written an incredibly obnoxious analysis of The Big Game. The headline itself is a neck-snapper: “The Existential Hell of This Year’s Super Bowl.”

“Football, like Trumpism, likes to believe that it’s about working-class folks in the heartland. But this year’s Super Bowl, like the Trump administration, bows to the Acela corridor. It nearly brought together two teams from underexposed cities, Jacksonville and Minneapolis. Instead it brings together two teams from celebrated theaters of history in the Northeast. So much for the little guy,” Bruni opines.

This comes from someone who is so much a part of the Acela corridor that he can’t even see how effete his analysis is anymore. His main claim to fame is that he is the first openly gay columnist for DaTimes.

But there’s more from Bruni.

“During the 2016 campaign, the Patriots’ owner, Robert Kraft, attested to Trump’s fine character, while the Patriots’ coach, Bill Belichick, wrote privately to Trump to congratulate him for his perseverance, telling him, ‘Your leadership is amazing.’”

Failing in his politically correct assessment, Bruni then just gets nasty. “[W]hen he looks at the Patriots’ glamour-puss quarterback, Tom Brady, he sees a younger, less quizzically coifed version of himself, complete with a foreign-born model for a wife. Trust me on this. He just squints extra hard, sucks in his gut and begs Melania to answer to ‘Gisele’ for a while.”

As a resident of Philadelphia, I would like to see the Eagles win. The city has been starved for a champion since the Phils’ 2008 World Series victory. Villanova is in the suburbs so its national basketball championship doesn’t really count in the city.

Moreover, if the Eagles win, sports writers will be flummoxed again by quarterback Nick Foles praising God after a victory.

Nevertheless, the Eagles have a significantly high number of protestors during the national anthem. One of the team’s most prominent members, Malcolm Jenkins, pushed a policy for “emotional training” for cops, and the Philadelphia police have complained and the players’ sentiments. See https://www.cnsnews.com/blog/craig-bannister/nfl-network-air-eagles-players-call-emotional-intelligence-training-police

Even though my Philadelphia friends may disown me, I could live with a New England win, particularly since it would be politically incorrect among the “intellectual” elite.

Simply put, it’s a win-win for me in this existential hell! Sorry, Frank.

Rob Foldy/Getty Images

“All I was saying was that a losing team, plus bread and circuses, was better than a losing team and a long, still silence.”

Bill Veeck

While Tom Brady prepares for his eighth trip to the Superbowl in 16 years (not counting the season he spent injured) to close his season Tim Tebow who won a playoff game against the Steele’s before being crushed by Tom Brady’s Patriots in what would be his final NFL start is about to start a season in Major League Training camp:

Tim Tebow is about to receive his most significant exposure yet to top-level baseball competition. The Mets announced Friday that they have invited Tebow to Major League Spring Training, giving the former college and professional football star another opportunity to stride forward in his baseball career.

Tebow is among 13 non-roster invitees to Spring Training — a list that also includes blue-chip first-base prospect Peter Alonso (ranked as the Mets’ No. 7 prospect by MLB Pipeline) former Nationals catcher Jose Lobaton and Drew Smith, the reliever the Mets acquired for Lucas Duda last July.

Tebow put up respectable numbers last season in the minors and the taste of the Majors in spring training certainly can’t hurt his development and while he would be a longshot to make the Major league squad he will likely sell quite a few tickets this spring.

Of course there are those who have made a career hating Tebow for his unapologetic very public Christianity who aren’t going to be too happy and there are a few who figure that the Mets a planning on Tebow to financially salvage a season brimming with low expectations.

Taking that cynicism even further, you could see Tebow’s spring training invite as a test run of sorts for the Mets in preparation to bring him up for a promotional tour later in the season if the Mets are out of the playoff race and looking to sell some tickets in August and September.

Given it’s the job of teams to sell tickets there’s nothing wrong with that idea plus while his numbers in the NFL were never impressive his teams had a regular habit of winning games he started.

And if things don’t work out in the next two years with the Mets there’s always the Orlando team of the XFL in 2020.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT — My grown son and I have a tradition where each year we go see all the Oscar nominated movies: at least those in the main categories.  We don’t always master this completely.  Last year I don’t think there were any we wanted to see, but Usually we see most of them before Oscar night.

Hollywood has become so politicized and everyone has an agenda so I don’t usually even watch the awards ceremony itself.  I can’t stomach watching the Hollywood elite lecturing to me.  But I do enjoy watching movies, so there’s that.

Anyway, we haven’t seen too many yet this year.  So far we’ve seen Darkest Hour, Phantom Thread, Star Wars: the Last Jedi (is that even nominated for anything?  I have no idea…), and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Regardless of how the movie is, the point of this, and the fun of it, is that my grown kid and I get to spend the afternoon together doing something we both enjoy.

The first movie we saw in our quest this year was Darkest Hour.  I thought Gary Oldman was fabulous as Churchill and as soon as we walked out of the theater I looked at John and asked, “How is that not an Oscar winning performance?!”

He look at me as if I had two heads, blinked, and said, “Because Daniel Day Lewis.”

So the next movie we saw was Phantom Thread and I understood what he meant.  But my heart is still with Oldman.

Phantom Thread was lush; the costumes were beautiful, the settings elegant, and the story engaging.  And no question that Daniel Day Lewis was totally immersed in his character.

Our most recent film was Three Billboards and here I found my favorite.  Frances McDormand is simply an amazing actress and while I wanted her on screen every single frame, Woody Harrelson and Sam Parkman were terrific.  Parkman absolutely must win his category as supporting actor.  The movie is very dark but there are comic moments; the main reason to see this one is McDormand.  It’s definitely her best role since Fargo.

Next on our list is I, Tonya.  We are watching these in no order whatsoever; our decisions are based primarily on what is showing where and when.

After each movie we linger over a long lunch and share our thoughts and revise our predictions.

In the end, it doesn’t matter who wins what; I’ve already won by getting to spend a few hours each week with my grown kid and I’ve seen some great movies as well.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.