10 Thoughts Under my Fedora: Risk and Rewards in Blog Exiles, Policing, School Shootings, Cultural Decay et/al

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10 Thoughts Under my Fedora: Risk and Rewards in Blog Exiles, Policing, School Shootings, Cultural Decay et/al

The return of my blog from GoDaddy’s exile is still pretty new and the first thing I’ve noticed is the drop in daily traf­fic, illus­trated by the graphic above. In the world of the inter­net being away for a week can have a crip­pling effect It’s going to take a while for the peo­ple who stopped by daily to dis­cover I’m back and for blog­gers to fig­ure out there is some­thing to link to again. That’s been the most dis­cour­ag­ing part of the entire exer­cise. I still remain amazed at the level of indif­fer­ence to my sit­u­a­tion, par­tic­u­larly from the peo­ple I spoke to vs those I chat­ted with, but when your rat­ings as an employee are mea­sured by raw stats vs actual cus­tomer sat­is­fac­tion it’s not a sur­prise. In the 7 con­tacts I had with the GoDaddy peo­ple I encoun­tered a sin­gle per­son who con­veyed to me the idea that they really wanted to get me back up and run­ning, but appar­ently such efforts risk the ire of oth­ers who might be forced into effort and thus are not popular.

I’m going to find a com­pany to whom my busi­ness, small as it is, means something.


This is actu­ally a good par­al­lel to a piece that ran in Pow­er­line about the attempt of a San Fran­cisco van rental com­pany to get local police to show an inter­est in one of their stolen vans that they, the van com­pany, acci­den­tally came across and fol­lowed it until it parked within sight of a police sta­tion. The story is told in a series of tweets by the van com­pany owner. The unwill­ing­ness of police to get involved, even to the point of just stand­ing near them when they con­fronted the thieves, is a great exam­ple of the same issue as the GoDaddy Busi­ness. Why take a risk in vio­lat­ing the strict pro­to­cols imposed by the lib­eral city fathers when such vio­la­tions can risk a solid job with a good pen­sion? Much eas­ier to make the peo­ple you are sup­pos­edly tasked with serv­ing and pro­tect­ing jump through hoops instead.

The story elicited this com­ment from one of their read­ers who moved to SF from the lib­eral bas­tion of Boston:

I moved to the Bay area 18 months ago from Boston… In the past 18 months I have had my car bro­ken into (lap­top, other items stolen) and then in Decem­ber our home was bur­gu­lar­ized.. The police response to the car breakin was pathetic… I called them after com­ing back to my car and find­ing my win­dow smashed (10 min­utes, car parked on a busy street 7:00am rush hour traf­fic) and their response was “fill out a report online”… When our home was bur­gu­lar­ized we again called the police; they showed up a day and a half after we called… at that point we had put the house back toge­hter and were going to send some­one to fin­ger­print the win­dow where they accessed the house… 3 days later after being told they were com­ing (calls at 4:00am) no one showed. The police report still hasn’t been sent to us; the paper­work they were using still has Kamala Har­ris listed as AG and my taxes are OUT OF CON­TROL. I hope to be part of the mass exit in the next 2436 months. If you’re con­tem­plat­ing mov­ing to San Fran­cisco… Don’t. Don’t do it.

Not many things will pierce the lib­eral bub­ble for peo­ple. But this type of thing will.


I didn’t hear about the lat­est school shoot­ing until I was dri­ving home from work in the wee hours of the morn­ing and the con­text I heard it from was Steve Kerr’s rant about the NRA. We keep hear­ing a lot from a lot of celebri­ties blam­ing the NRA every sin­gle time there is a shoot­ing, even though the shoot­ers never seem to be an NRA mem­bers. How­ever there are a few peo­ple who actu­ally gets what’s going on:

If you think it’s bad now, just wait until the gen­er­a­tion whose babysit­ter is an iPhone is in high school. You can hardly walk around Wal Mart these days with­out trip­ping over a tod­dler in a trance star­ing at a screen.

The high school kids who shot rifle in school in 1985 were taught right and wrong. They were taught what to do with their rifle in school, and what not to do. If they got out of line, all the other stu­dents and the coach would have come down on them hard. There were no safe spaces, and that was a good thing.

Cul­ture is a pow­er­ful force for good. When good behav­ior is nor­mal­ized and deviant destruc­tive behav­ior is ostra­cized, shamed and mar­gin­al­ized, you get more good behavior.

That’s J. Chris­t­ian Adams at PJ media as he talks about the fact that thirty years ago you had gun clubs in schools and some­how you didn’t have mass shoot­ings. I won­der why? Per­haps the teach­ers are afraid of being thought judg­men­tal if they bring up such facts.


This actu­ally brought to mind Valentine’s Day/​Ash Wednes­day. Yes­ter­day the wife ended up going to mass at our parish school where our Pas­tor cel­e­brated Mass for the stu­dents and got our Ashes. A few hours later I got to work and noticed some­thing miss­ing. 20 years ago I would have expected to see at least a half dozen such peo­ple at my work­place and plenty in the pub­lic dur­ing the day wear­ing ashes. Forty years ago the major­ity of the peo­ple around me would have been wear­ing ashes that day, but at work that day there wasn’t a sin­gle other per­son with ashes on their head and only a cou­ple of peo­ple on the shift rec­og­nized what the ashes were. Sev­eral came up to me to tell me I had a stain on my head (in fair­ness one of them was an Iraqi who likely isn’t famil­iar with Chris­tian­ity). On that very same day I lis­tened as an oth­er­wise sen­si­ble young lady insist to another that Mike Pence wanted to put les­bians like her in con­cen­tra­tion camps and pooh poohing my call­ing out such insanity.

CK Chester­ton famously wrote that mod­ern reform­ers often rush to do away with things with­out under­stand­ing the pur­pose they serve Our friends on the left have spent two gen­er­a­tions De-​Christianizeing our cul­ture never not­ing the ben­e­fits it pro­duced for the pub­lic. Only now two gen­er­a­tions later are peo­ple see­ing the price this deci­sion car­ried. I sub­mit and sug­gest yesterday’s events in Florida, those events in San Fran­cisco and even my issues with GoDaddy are exam­ples of this cost.


Roger Simon spots another such exam­ple of this price as he tells the tale of an inci­dent at an Ivy League University:

Fear of phys­i­cal con­tact on the part of stu­dents? Where have we heard that before? Park­land, per­haps? At least the Florida school had the gump­tion to throw Cruz out, even if the author­i­ties did not fol­low up as they should have and averted the car­nage. The stu­dent — of color or not — who stood up inches from Pro­fes­sor Rosen and yelled “FUCK YOU” should have been thrown out of Prince­ton that very day never to return.

Prince­ton — in the cur­rent Ivy League tra­di­tion — did a bunch of noth­ing. First Yale at Hal­loween, then Dart­mouth in its library, now Prince­ton — our sup­pos­edly great­est uni­ver­si­ties have become our great­est cen­ters of adult abdi­ca­tion, espe­cially on the part of their admin­is­tra­tions. Who will be sur­prised if vio­lence comes next?

This abdi­ca­tion of adult and, quite often, parental respon­si­bil­ity is ram­pant in today’s Amer­ica. This is not just due to the run­away epi­demic of polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness in our cul­ture and its easy dis­par­age­ment of tra­di­tional val­ues. It is the Chi­nese Cul­tural Revolution-​style vio­lence that this behav­ior engen­ders. The Prince­ton stu­dents ter­ri­fied to defend Pro­fes­sor Rosen in his class were not all that dif­fer­ent from the pan­icked Park­land stu­dents flee­ing Cruz. The Prince­to­ni­ans were scared for their lives to pipe up.

Why risk get­ting in trou­ble by con­fronting a poten­tially vio­lent stu­dent, par­tic­u­larly one of color, and risk being branded as a hate mon­ger, much eas­ier to can­cel the speech, can­cel the class and say no more about it, after all you don’t want to risk stem­ming the flow of the money com­ing in do you?


There are in fact moments when adults seem to cry enough. One of those took place when an Ore­gon school dis­trict decided to can­cel Valentine’s day

The Bethel School Board’s response is a typ­i­cal gov­ern­ment reac­tion to find­ing out peo­ple don’t like some­thing they did. Most boards hate hear­ing crit­i­cism and label it “threat­en­ing” so they don’t have to con­tinue lis­ten­ing. This is a com­mon tac­tic used by elected offi­cials to avoid hear­ing from angry con­stituents. Some will even go so far as to break state law to avoid hear­ing from vot­ers. It appears that the Bethel School Dis­trict may have done just that. The very first rule of the Ore­gon Open Meet­ings Act states clearly that all pub­lic meet­ings are to be open to the pub­lic and pro­vide accom­mo­da­tions. If there isn’t enough space, the board is respon­si­ble for find­ing space and hear­ing each citizen’s con­cern. The Bethel board’s refusal to pro­vide space, even when warned ahead of the meet­ing that they needed to, could be a vio­la­tion of state law. Fur­ther, attempt­ing to shut down a meet­ing before pub­lic com­ment has been made is also a vio­la­tion of state law. Thank­fully, the board decided to resched­ule the meet­ing for later in the week in a big­ger loca­tion, but not before attempt­ing to get away with not nam­ing a new date. The crowd refused to let that hap­pen and forced them to name a date and time. Sev­eral par­ents are still con­cerned they will change the venue with­out notice.
Con­trary to the board’s claims of unruli­ness and dis­or­der, this meet­ing was a clas­sic exam­ple of democ­racy in action. Board mem­bers tend to for­get that they work for the peo­ple and a strong reminder is often needed to get them back on track. The par­ents of the Bethel School Dis­trict are doing what every Amer­i­can should be doing: hold­ing elected offi­cials account­able for their actions. If par­ents don’t stand up against the onslaught of anti-​Americanism and the destruc­tion of our tra­di­tions and cul­ture we will soon have no tra­di­tions left.

The real ques­tion though is how many of these par­ents will be show­ing up on elec­tion day to vote these ras­cals out, or will that be too much trouble?

One of the things that Polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness does is try to play the risk reward card on peo­ple to change their behav­ior, sug­gest­ing that the risk of pub­lic oppro­brium for a pub­lic action or expres­sion is not worth the reward of free speech or action. While this is a hor­ri­ble dan­ger at times it is the source of incred­i­ble amuse­ment as illus­trated by this

The per­son who sent out this tweet is an edu­cated citien, here is her twit­ter profile

Senior Edi­tor & Plan­e­tary Evan­ge­list, The Plan­e­tary Soci­ety. Plan­e­tary sci­en­tist, writer, pub­lic speaker. Writ­ing a book on Curios­ity mis­sion. Aster­oid 274860.

You know what’s really funny? She doesn’t sound any dif­fer­ent from Richard Rus­sell howl­ing against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and the hor­ror of black and white peo­ple attend­ing social events together.

Democ­rats ever the party of segregation.


I’m still laugh­ing at the offi­cial por­traits of Barack and Michelle Obama that were unveiled last week. There were in one respect a per­fect rep­re­sen­ta­tion of the pair’s time in office. A lot of hype but not a lot of sub­stance. While in that regard it’s an amus­ing diver­sion he was still the pres­i­dent of the United states and he and the first lady deserve than they got, not for the sake of them­selves but for the sake of the office.


One other thing about Valentine’s Day falling on Ash Wednes­day. It’s often for­got­ten that Valentine’s Day is actu­ally the feast day of St. Valen­tine who was mar­tyred that day by the Roman Emperor Claudius II

Under the rule of Claudius the Cruel, Rome was involved in many unpop­u­lar and bloody cam­paigns. The emperor had to main­tain a strong army, but was hav­ing a dif­fi­cult time get­ting sol­diers to join his mil­i­tary leagues. Claudius believed that Roman men were unwill­ing to join the army because of their strong attach­ment to their wives and families.

To get rid of the prob­lem, Claudius banned all mar­riages and engage­ments in Rome. Valen­tine, real­iz­ing the injus­tice of the decree, defied Claudius and con­tin­ued to per­form mar­riages for young lovers in secret.

When Valentine’s actions were dis­cov­ered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Valen­tine was arrested and dragged before the Pre­fect of Rome, who con­demned him to be beaten to death with clubs and to have his head cut off. The sen­tence was car­ried out on Feb­ru­ary 14, on or about the year 270.

Leg­end also has it that while in jail, St. Valen­tine left a farewell note for the jailer’s daugh­ter, who had become his friend, and signed it “From Your Valentine.”

I sus­pect this Catholic Priest would have approved Catholics main­tain­ing the Ash Wednes­day fast on his feast day. My solu­tion was to pick up Chi­nese food after work and eat with daw­ife after midnight.


Finally CPAC is only a week away and I’ll be there with both of my sons, they’ll be hit­ting the city while I hit the inter­view trail and maybe sell a book or two. If you are going to be there I’d love to see you and if you want to be inter­viewed con­tact me and we’ll set up a time. And don’t for­get to ask for a can­noli while they last.


If you’d like to con­tinue to sup­port inde­pen­dent jour­nal­ism, and help defray the costs of mov­ing this site and the pay­less week via CPAC please con­sider hit­ting DaTip­Jar here.



Con­sider sub­scrib­ing. If we can get 92 more sub­scribers at $20 a month I can do this full time with­out worry.


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Finally might I sug­gest my book Hail Mary the Per­fect Protes­tant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excel­lent Gift.

The return of my blog from GoDaddy’s exile is still pretty new and the first thing I’ve noticed is the drop in daily traffic, illustrated by the graphic above.  In the world of the internet being away for a week can have a crippling effect  It’s going to take a while for the people who stopped by daily to discover I’m back and for bloggers to figure out there is something to link to again.  That’s been the most discouraging part of the entire exercise.  I still remain amazed at the level of indifference to my situation, particularly from the people I spoke to vs those I chatted with, but when your ratings as an employee are measured by raw stats vs actual customer satisfaction it’s not a surprise.  In the 7 contacts I had with the GoDaddy people I encountered a single person who conveyed to me the idea that they really wanted to get me back up and running, but apparently such efforts risk the ire of others who might be forced into effort and thus are not popular.

I’m going to find a company to whom my business, small as it is, means something.


This is actually a good parallel to a piece that ran in Powerline about the attempt of a San Francisco van rental company to get local police to show an interest in one of their stolen vans that they, the van company, accidentally came across and followed it until it parked within sight of a police station.  The story is told in a series of tweets by the van company owner.  The unwillingness of police to get involved, even to the point of just standing near them when they confronted the thieves, is a great example of the same issue as the GoDaddy Business.  Why take a risk in violating the strict protocols imposed by the liberal city fathers when such violations can risk a solid job with a good pension?  Much easier to make the people you are supposedly tasked with serving and protecting jump through hoops instead.

The story elicited this comment from one of their readers who moved to SF from the liberal bastion of Boston:

I moved to the Bay area 18 months ago from Boston… In the past 18 months I have had my car broken into (laptop, other items stolen) and then in December our home was burgularized.. The police response to the car breakin was pathetic… I called them after coming back to my car and finding my window smashed (10 minutes, car parked on a busy street 7:00am rush hour traffic) and their response was “fill out a report online”… When our home was burgularized we again called the police; they showed up a day and a half after we called… at that point we had put the house back togehter and were going to send someone to fingerprint the window where they accessed the house… 3 days later after being told they were coming (calls at 4:00am) no one showed. The police report still hasn’t been sent to us; the paperwork they were using still has Kamala Harris listed as AG and my taxes are OUT OF CONTROL. I hope to be part of the mass exit in the next 24 – 36 months. If you’re contemplating moving to San Francisco… Don’t. Don’t do it.

Not many things will pierce the liberal bubble for people.  But this type of thing will.


I didn’t hear about the latest school shooting until I was driving home from work in the wee hours of the morning and the context I heard it from was Steve Kerr’s rant about the NRA.  We keep hearing a lot from a lot of celebrities blaming the NRA every single time there is a shooting, even though the shooters never seem to be an NRA members.  However there are a few people who actually gets what’s going on:

If you think it’s bad now, just wait until the generation whose babysitter is an iPhone is in high school.  You can hardly walk around Wal Mart these days without tripping over a toddler in a trance staring at a screen.

The high school kids who shot rifle in school in 1985 were taught right and wrong.  They were taught what to do with their rifle in school, and what not to do.  If they got out of line, all the other students and the coach would have come down on them hard.  There were no safe spaces, and that was a good thing.

Culture is a powerful force for good.  When good behavior is normalized and deviant destructive behavior is ostracized, shamed and marginalized, you get more good behavior.

That’s J. Christian Adams at PJ media as he talks about the fact that thirty years ago you had gun clubs in schools and somehow you didn’t have mass shootings. I wonder why?  Perhaps the teachers are afraid of being thought judgmental if they bring up such facts.


This actually brought to mind Valentine’s Day/Ash Wednesday.  Yesterday the wife ended up going to mass at our parish school where our Pastor celebrated Mass for the students and got our Ashes.  A few hours later I got to work and noticed something missing.  20 years ago I would have expected to see at least a half dozen such people at my workplace and plenty in the public during the day wearing ashes.  Forty years ago the majority of the people around me would have been wearing ashes that day, but at work that day there wasn’t a single other person with ashes on their head and only a couple of people on the shift recognized what the ashes were.  Several came up to me to tell me I had a stain on my head (in fairness one of them was an Iraqi who likely isn’t familiar with Christianity).   On that very same day I listened as an otherwise sensible young lady insist to another that Mike Pence wanted to put lesbians like her in concentration camps  and pooh poohing my calling out such insanity.

CK Chesterton famously wrote that modern reformers often rush to do away with things without understanding the purpose they serve  Our friends on the left have spent two generations De-Christianizeing our culture never noting the benefits it produced for the public.  Only now two generations later are people seeing the price this decision carried.  I submit and suggest yesterday’s events in Florida, those events in San Francisco and even my issues with GoDaddy are examples of this cost.


Roger Simon spots another such example of this price as he tells the tale of an incident at an Ivy League University:

Fear of physical contact on the part of students? Where have we heard that before?  Parkland, perhaps?  At least the Florida school had the gumption to throw Cruz out, even if the authorities did not follow up as they should have and averted the carnage. The student — of color or not — who stood up inches from Professor Rosen and yelled “FUCK YOU” should have been thrown out of Princeton that very day never to return.

Princeton — in the current Ivy League tradition — did a bunch of nothing.  First Yale at Halloween, then Dartmouth in its library, now Princeton — our supposedly greatest universities have become our greatest centers of adult abdication, especially on the part of their administrations.  Who will be surprised if violence comes next?

This abdication of adult and, quite often, parental responsibility is rampant in today’s America.  This is not just due to the runaway epidemic of political correctness in our culture and its easy disparagement of traditional values.  It is the Chinese Cultural Revolution-style violence that this behavior engenders.  The Princeton students terrified to defend Professor Rosen in his class were not all that different from the panicked Parkland students fleeing Cruz. The Princetonians were scared for their lives to pipe up.

Why risk getting in trouble by confronting a potentially violent student, particularly one of color, and risk being branded as a hate monger, much easier to cancel the speech, cancel the class and say no more about it, after all you don’t want to risk stemming the flow of the money coming in do you?


There are in fact moments when adults seem to cry enough.  One of those took place when an Oregon school district decided to cancel Valentine’s day

The Bethel School Board’s response is a typical government reaction to finding out people don’t like something they did. Most boards hate hearing criticism and label it “threatening” so they don’t have to continue listening. This is a common tactic used by elected officials to avoid hearing from angry constituents. Some will even go so far as to break state law to avoid hearing from voters. It appears that the Bethel School District may have done just that. The very first rule of the Oregon Open Meetings Act states clearly that all public meetings are to be open to the public and provide accommodations. If there isn’t enough space, the board is responsible for finding space and hearing each citizen’s concern. The Bethel board’s refusal to provide space, even when warned ahead of the meeting that they needed to, could be a violation of state law. Further, attempting to shut down a meeting before public comment has been made is also a violation of state law. Thankfully, the board decided to reschedule the meeting for later in the week in a bigger location, but not before attempting to get away with not naming a new date. The crowd refused to let that happen and forced them to name a date and time. Several parents are still concerned they will change the venue without notice.
 
Contrary to the board’s claims of unruliness and disorder, this meeting was a classic example of democracy in action. Board members tend to forget that they work for the people and a strong reminder is often needed to get them back on track. The parents of the Bethel School District are doing what every American should be doing: holding elected officials accountable for their actions. If parents don’t stand up against the onslaught of anti-Americanism and the destruction of our traditions and culture we will soon have no traditions left.

The real question though is how many of these parents will be showing up on election day to vote these rascals out, or will that be too much trouble?

One of the things that Political correctness does is try to play the risk reward card on people to change their behavior, suggesting that the risk of public opprobrium  for a public action or expression is not worth the reward of free speech or action.  While this is a horrible danger at times it is the source of incredible amusement as illustrated by this

The person who sent out this tweet is an educated citien, here is her twitter profile

Senior Editor & Planetary Evangelist, The Planetary Society. Planetary scientist, writer, public speaker. Writing a book on Curiosity mission. Asteroid 274860.

You know what’s really funny? She doesn’t sound any different from Richard Russell howling against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and the horror of black and white people attending social events together.

Democrats ever the party of segregation.


I’m still laughing at the official portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama that were unveiled last week. There were in one respect a perfect representation of the pair’s time in office. A lot of hype but not a lot of substance.   While in that regard it’s an amusing diversion he was still the president of the United states and he and the first lady deserve than they got, not for the sake of themselves but for the sake of the office.


One other thing about Valentine’s Day falling on Ash Wednesday.  It’s often forgotten that Valentine’s Day is actually the feast day of St. Valentine who was martyred that day by the Roman Emperor Claudius II

Under the rule of Claudius the Cruel, Rome was involved in many unpopular and bloody campaigns. The emperor had to maintain a strong army, but was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. Claudius believed that Roman men were unwilling to join the army because of their strong attachment to their wives and families.

To get rid of the problem, Claudius banned all marriages and engagements in Rome. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret.

When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Valentine was arrested and dragged before the Prefect of Rome, who condemned him to be beaten to death with clubs and to have his head cut off. The sentence was carried out on February 14, on or about the year 270.

Legend also has it that while in jail, St. Valentine left a farewell note for the jailer’s daughter, who had become his friend, and signed it “From Your Valentine.”

I suspect this Catholic Priest  would have approved Catholics maintaining the Ash Wednesday fast on his feast day.  My solution was to pick up Chinese food after work and eat with dawife after midnight.


Finally CPAC is only a week away and I’ll be there with both of my sons, they’ll be hitting the city while I hit the interview trail and maybe sell a book or two.  If you are going to be there I’d love to see you and if you want to be interviewed contact me and we’ll set up a time.  And don’t forget to ask for a cannoli while they last.


If you’d like to continue to support independent journalism, and help defray the costs of moving this site and the payless week via CPAC please consider hitting DaTipJar here.



Consider subscribing.  If we can get 92 more subscribers at $20 a month I can do this full time without worry.


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Finally might I suggest my book  Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift.