Report from Louisiana: Landrieu Speaks about Confederate Monuments

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Report from Louisiana: Landrieu Speaks about Confederate Monuments

By: Pat Austin

SHREVE­PORT — New Orleans Mayor Lan­drieu is pub­li­ciz­ing his new book which is out March 20 and as the mayor blus­ters and pon­tif­i­cates all over the media, one can’t help but con­sider how he rel­ished the mon­u­ment drama as fuel for future book sales.

Last week he spoke to the press about his plans for the sites in New Orleans that pre­vi­ously held Con­fed­er­ate mon­u­ments. It’s been about a year since Lan­drieu had four mon­u­ments removed: the mon­u­ment at Lib­erty Place was taken in the dead of night. In the fol­low­ing days and weeks Lan­drieu also removed those of Jef­fer­son Davis, P.G.T. Beau­re­gard, and Robert E. Lee, leav­ing blighted pub­lic areas and empty pedestals in their place.

Dur­ing Mardi Gras, he placed a ring of porta-​potties around Lee Circle.

The whole issue still makes me angry when I think about it. My posi­tion has always been that these mon­u­ments rep­re­sent his­tory and to destroy pub­lic art does not change that his­tory or make it dis­ap­pear. Lan­drieu never engaged the oppos­ing side in any of his plans, an effort that cer­tainly would have been bet­ter for the city and reduced ten­sion. But that wouldn’t have sold as many books.

At these sites, Mayor Lan­drieu plans to place an Amer­i­can flag where the Jef­fer­son Davis mon­u­ment stood. As for Lee Cir­cle, he’s defer­ring that to oth­ers to decide. At the Beau­re­gard site, the City Park Improve­ment Asso­ci­a­tion will land­scape and clean up the area and the pedestal will be removed. Noth­ing will go where the Lib­erty Place mon­u­ment was.

Lan­drieu says that those com­pa­nies who didn’t make their equip­ment avail­able to him to remove the stat­ues were prac­tic­ing “indus­trial racism” and he con­tin­ues to insult the ances­tors of a great num­ber of southerners:

Really what these mon­u­ments were, were a lie,” Lan­drieu told Cooper on “60 Min­utes. “Robert E. Lee was used as an exam­ple to send a mes­sage to the rest of the coun­try, and to all the peo­ple that lived here, that the Con­fed­er­acy was a noble cause. And that’s just not true.”

It’s dif­fi­cult to know what to say to peo­ple who refuse to see both sides of his­tory. And I’m a lit­tle embar­rassed for him for being so blind and uninformed.

The entire mon­u­ment removal fiasco was ques­tion­able on many lev­els and many ques­tioned var­i­ous legal aspects of the project, includ­ing who paid for the removal, why city work­ers were used to remove the mon­u­ments, and who was behind the foun­da­tion that funded part of the removal.

He said the mon­u­ments belong in muse­ums but a year later they are still crated up in some city warehouse.

That Lan­drieu is kick­ing the can down the road with regard to the place­ment of the mon­u­ments them­selves should sur­prise no one. As Mike Bay­ham points out, Lan­drieu wants to go on his book tour as the guy who removed the mon­u­ments, “not rearranged them.”

But you can rest assured that when­ever (or if ever) Davis, et al leave the city ware­house, Lan­drieu will be bask­ing in the klieg lights of the media to crit­i­cize wher­ever they go, because that’s his racket and sole source of rel­e­vancy in the national media.

Instead of trans­fer­ring the stat­ues to an appro­pri­ate his­toric venue that would secure and main­tain them, New Orleans is going to be treated to a new round of acri­mo­nious bick­er­ing in shout­ing matches euphemisti­cally labeled “lis­ten­ing ses­sions”, with the fringes of both sides being promi­nently fea­tured by the media. Drag­ging things out ben­e­fits Landrieu’s national stature, though not the incom­ing New Orleans gov­ern­ment, which should be focused on the qual­ity of life mat­ters that will be left fes­ter­ing on their doorstep.

While New Orleans is one of the most his­toric, vibrant, and beau­ti­ful cities in the South, it has suf­fered greatly under Landrieu’s tenure. Crime has been out of con­trol and the mayor has made lit­tle effort to do any­thing about that. He is now a lame duck as he pre­pares to step aside for the new mayor elect, LaToya Cantrell, a Demo­c­rat who won the elec­tion with 60.4% of the vote.

One hopes that the incom­ing admin­is­tra­tion will deal with this issue with more finesse than Lan­drieu has done.

Here is the 60-​Minutes tran­script if you missed it.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreve­port; fol­low her on Insta­gram at @patbecker25 and Twit­ter at paustin110.

By: Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT — New Orleans Mayor Landrieu is publicizing his new book which is out March 20 and as the mayor blusters and pontificates all over the media, one can’t help but consider how he relished the monument drama as fuel for future book sales.

Last week he spoke to the press about his plans for the sites in New Orleans that previously held Confederate monuments.  It’s been about a year since Landrieu had four monuments removed: the monument at Liberty Place was taken in the dead of night. In the following days and weeks Landrieu also removed those of  Jefferson Davis, P.G.T. Beauregard, and Robert E. Lee, leaving blighted public areas and empty pedestals in their place.

During Mardi Gras, he placed a ring of porta-potties around Lee Circle.

The whole issue still makes me angry when I think about it.  My position has always been that these monuments represent history and to destroy public art does not change that history or make it disappear.  Landrieu never engaged the opposing side in any of his plans, an effort that certainly would have been better for the city and reduced tension.  But that wouldn’t have sold as many books.

At these sites, Mayor Landrieu plans to place an American flag where the Jefferson Davis monument stood.  As for Lee Circle, he’s deferring that to others to decide.  At the Beauregard site, the City Park Improvement Association will landscape and clean up the area and the pedestal will be removed.  Nothing will go where the Liberty Place monument was.

Landrieu says that those companies who didn’t make their equipment available to him to remove the statues were practicing “industrial racism” and he continues to insult the ancestors of a great number of southerners:

“Really what these monuments were, were a lie,” Landrieu told Cooper on “60 Minutes. “Robert E. Lee was used as an example to send a message to the rest of the country, and to all the people that lived here, that the Confederacy was a noble cause. And that’s just not true.”

It’s difficult to know what to say to people who refuse to see both sides of history.  And I’m a little embarrassed for him for being so blind and uninformed.

The entire monument removal fiasco was questionable on many levels and many questioned various legal aspects of the project, including who paid for the removal, why city workers were used to remove the monuments, and who was behind the foundation that funded part of the removal.

He said the monuments belong in museums but a year later they are still crated up in some city warehouse.

That Landrieu is kicking the can down the road with regard to the placement of the monuments themselves should surprise no one.  As Mike Bayham points out, Landrieu wants to go on his book tour as the guy who removed the monuments, “not rearranged them.”

But you can rest assured that whenever (or if ever) Davis, et al leave the city warehouse, Landrieu will be basking in the klieg lights of the media to criticize wherever they go, because that’s his racket and sole source of relevancy in the national media.

Instead of transferring the statues to an appropriate historic venue that would secure and maintain them, New Orleans is going to be treated to a new round of acrimonious bickering in shouting matches euphemistically labeled “listening sessions”, with the fringes of both sides being prominently featured by the media. Dragging things out benefits Landrieu’s national stature, though not the incoming New Orleans government, which should be focused on the quality of life matters that will be left festering on their doorstep.

While New Orleans is one of the most historic, vibrant, and beautiful cities in the South, it has suffered greatly under Landrieu’s tenure.  Crime has been out of control and the mayor has made little effort to do anything about that.  He is now a lame duck as he prepares to step aside for the new mayor elect, LaToya Cantrell, a Democrat who won the election with 60.4% of the vote.

One hopes that the incoming administration will deal with this issue with more finesse than Landrieu has done.

Here is the 60-Minutes transcript if you missed it.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport; follow her on Instagram at @patbecker25 and Twitter at paustin110.