Series review: Portlandia

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Series review: Portlandia

By John Ruberry

When I came into office I took an oath, alright,” the mayor of Port­land (Kyle MacLach­lan) pro­claims in Port­landia. “The oath was to keep Port­land weird.”

And so he did.

The final episode of Port­landia, a sketch com­edy series focus­ing on the hip­sters who have taken over Port­land, Ore­gon, aired on Thurs­day. The IFC show stars Sat­ur­day Night Live alum­nus Fred Armisen and for­mer Sleater-​Kinney singer and gui­tarist Car­rie Brownstein.

Over the last cou­ple of decades Port­land has become one of America’s most lib­eral cities. Do you remem­ber the left-​wing talk radio net­work from the 2000s, Air Amer­ica? Its strongest mar­ket was Portland.

Most of the skits cen­ter on Armisen and Brown­stein, includ­ing their Fred and Car­rie char­ac­ters, eas­ily the least quirky of their Port­landia per­sonas, who are also the best friends – “my favorite Port­landers” – of MacLachlan’s “Mr. Mayor.” Nina and Lance (He plays her she plays him), strug­gle in their rela­tion­ship because they have almost noth­ing in com­mon. Chin-​bearded Spyke (more on him later) and Iris look to me to be the arche­typal Port­land cou­ple. The Weirdos, Vince and Jacque­line, a goth cou­ple, a kind of a Port­land ver­sion of Fred and Lily Mun­ster, face their own con­flict. How do they get noticed in an increas­ingly freaky Port­land? They choose a trip to the beach as their solu­tion to this prob­lem, which is delayed after their hearse breaks down. In another episode, they are falsely accused of a torch­ing a taxi­dermy store. Their lawyer is another weirdo, Paul Reubens, bet­ter known of course as Pee Wee Herman.

But my favorite char­ac­ters, and the most devel­oped, are the own­ers of the Women & Women First book store – Toni and Can­dace, with Armisen play­ing the lat­ter. The cou­ple seems to have reached “les­bian bed death” years ago. It’s dif­fi­cult to see what the well-​adjusted Toni sees in the caus­tic Can­dace, who at a diary read­ing at the store barks at a late comer, “We’ve already done our jour­nals – hers was abysmal, she refuses to con­tribute any­thing, and of ours, of course I think we won.”

Can a con­ser­v­a­tive enjoy Port­landia? Well, this one did.

Three years ago I briefly vis­ited Port­land where I dis­cov­ered on my own that yes, it is weird, and it is filled with passive-​aggressive peo­ple, just like these two Sub­aru dri­vers in the below clip. That make of car is enor­mously pop­u­lar in Port­land, by the way. They are afraid to offend but they do just that when they can’t decide who should pro­ceed first at a four-​way stop. “You, go,” one says, “No, you go.”

Dur­ing that Port­land sojourn I encoun­tered some goofs, who were prob­a­bly stoned, reclin­ing inside a van at a gas sta­tion – I had to return my rental car with a full tank of gaso­line before I dropped it off at the air­port and I was in a hurry. They were block­ing both sides of a lane of gas pumps. After I asked politely for them to move a cou­ple of times, unlike the char­ac­ters in the above clip, I quickly threat­ened to bash them if they didn’t imme­di­ately make room for me. They did indeed go.

Port­landia offers view­ers a daz­zlingly eclec­tic ros­ter of top tier guest stars and cameos, includ­ing some who appear more than once, includ­ing Ed Beg­ley Jr., Jeff Gold­blum, Steve Buscemi, and Kumail Nanjian.

Oth­ers who show up once or twice include Aimee Mann (as her­self try­ing to make ends meet as a house­cleaner because of the dif­fi­culty of earn­ing money as a musi­cian in the era of stream­ing music), Matt Groen­ing (a Port­land native), Michael Nesm­sith, Penny Mar­shall, the B-​52s, Tim Rob­bins, Heather Gra­ham, Mar­tina Navratilova, k.d. Lang, Jason Sudekis, Paul Simon, Brigitte Nielsen, Greg Louga­nis, Henry Rollins, Jeff Tweedy, Louis C.K. (eww!), Andy Richter, George Wendt, the Flam­ing Lips, Andy Sam­berg, Eddie Ved­der, Seth Mey­ers, Sarah MacLach­lan, and Lau­rie Metcalf.

Spe­cial men­tion needs to be given to Roseanne Barr, who stars in two episodes as Portland’s interim mayor – she is hired from a temp agency. Yes, Barr is an actress, duh, who takes on roles, but Barr’s turn to the right may have been fore­shad­owed in Port­landia because she attempts to gov­ern Port­land prag­mat­i­cally, in con­trast to the loop­i­ness of Mr. Mayor. After all, I believe it was radio talker Den­nis Prager who said, “Com­mon sense is con­ser­vatism.” As mayor, Barr sug­gests hav­ing fewer bike lanes, cof­fee out­lets that sell only cof­fee, movie the­aters with more than one screen, not as many stores for dogs, but more big box out­lets. In short, she wants Port­land to be a prac­ti­cal city.

I’ve been to a lot of places, but nothing’s like this,” she com­plains. “Everybody’s just lost in a dream world.”

And finally, I’d like to acknowl­edge the reg­u­lar but all but anony­mous sup­port­ing per­form­ers on the pro­gram who live in the Port­land area, IFC calls them the Cit­i­zens of Port­landia. They are the show’s answer to the John Ford Stock Com­pany. These actors, who arrive like old friends, include Henry Cot­trell, Kris­tine Levine, Angel Bouchet, Jede­diah Aaker, and Sam Adams, who plays Mr. Mayor’s assis­tant. He was the real mayor of Port­land from 20092012.

Sea­son 8 was the only batch of episodes filmed dur­ing the Don­ald Trump pres­i­dency and I expected Port­landia to skewer what lib­er­als, and yes, con­ser­v­a­tives, see as low-​hanging fruit ripe for the pluck­ing. Amaz­ingly, the Port­landia uni­verse remains a Trump-​free zone. Although Spyke – remem­ber him? – reforms his old punk band, Riot Spray, fronted by the afore­men­tioned Rollins with Nirvana’s Krist Novoselic play­ing bass, as a protest ges­ture against unspec­i­fied cor­rup­tion in gov­ern­ment. But he does so after first threat­en­ing to Iris to move to Canada.

In a jab at those dozens of celebri­ties who vowed to move north of the bor­der if Trump won the pres­i­dency, Iris replies, “Spyke, no one moves to Canada.”

Sea­sons 17 of Port­landia are avail­able on Netl­fix, all of the episodes can be found on Comcast’s On Demand. This pro­gram is not for the lit­tle ones as there is some brief nudity here and there and some foul language.

John Ruberry, who has never had a chin beard, reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

By John Ruberry

“When I came into office I took an oath, alright,” the mayor of Portland (Kyle MacLachlan) proclaims in Portlandia. “The oath was to keep Portland weird.”

And so he did.

The final episode of Portlandia, a sketch comedy series focusing on the hipsters who have taken over Portland, Oregon, aired on Thursday. The IFC show stars Saturday Night Live alumnus Fred Armisen and former Sleater-Kinney singer and guitarist Carrie Brownstein.

Over the last couple of decades Portland has become one of America’s most liberal cities. Do you remember the left-wing talk radio network from the 2000s, Air America? Its strongest market was Portland.

Most of the skits center on Armisen and Brownstein, including their Fred and Carrie characters, easily the least quirky of their Portlandia personas, who are also the best friends–“my favorite Portlanders”–of MacLachlan’s “Mr. Mayor.” Nina and Lance (He plays her she plays him), struggle in their relationship because they have almost nothing in common. Chin-bearded Spyke (more on him later) and Iris look to me to be the archetypal Portland couple. The Weirdos, Vince and Jacqueline, a goth couple, a kind of a Portland version of Fred and Lily Munster, face their own conflict. How do they get noticed in an increasingly freaky Portland? They choose a trip to the beach as their solution to this problem, which is delayed after their hearse breaks down. In another episode, they are falsely accused of a torching a taxidermy store. Their lawyer is another weirdo, Paul Reubens, better known of course as Pee Wee Herman.

But my favorite characters, and the most developed, are the owners of the Women & Women First book store–Toni and Candace, with Armisen playing the latter. The couple seems to have reached “lesbian bed death” years ago. It’s difficult to see what the well-adjusted Toni sees in the caustic Candace, who at a diary reading at the store barks at a late comer, “We’ve already done our journals–hers was abysmal, she refuses to contribute anything, and of ours, of course I think we won.”

Can a conservative enjoy Portlandia? Well, this one did.

Three years ago I briefly visited Portland where I discovered on my own that yes, it is weird, and it is filled with passive-aggressive people, just like these two Subaru drivers in the below clip. That make of car is enormously popular in Portland, by the way. They are afraid to offend but they do just that when they can’t decide who should proceed first at a four-way stop. “You, go,” one says, “No, you go.”

During that Portland sojourn I encountered some goofs, who were probably stoned, reclining inside a van at a gas station–I had to return my rental car with a full tank of gasoline before I dropped it off at the airport and I was in a hurry. They were blocking both sides of a lane of gas pumps. After I asked politely for them to move a couple of times, unlike the characters in the above clip, I quickly threatened to bash them if they didn’t immediately make room for me. They did indeed go.

Portlandia offers viewers a dazzlingly eclectic roster of top tier guest stars and cameos, including some who appear more than once, including Ed Begley Jr., Jeff Goldblum, Steve Buscemi, and Kumail Nanjian.

Others who show up once or twice include Aimee Mann (as herself trying to make ends meet as a housecleaner because of the difficulty of earning money as a musician in the era of streaming music), Matt Groening (a Portland native), Michael Nesmsith, Penny Marshall, the B-52s, Tim Robbins, Heather Graham, Martina Navratilova, k.d. Lang, Jason Sudekis, Paul Simon, Brigitte Nielsen, Greg Louganis, Henry Rollins, Jeff Tweedy, Louis C.K. (eww!), Andy Richter, George Wendt, the Flaming Lips, Andy Samberg, Eddie Vedder, Seth Meyers, Sarah MacLachlan, and Laurie Metcalf.

Special mention needs to be given to Roseanne Barr, who stars in two episodes as Portland’s interim mayor–she is hired from a temp agency. Yes, Barr is an actress, duh, who takes on roles, but Barr’s turn to the right may have been foreshadowed in Portlandia because she attempts to govern Portland pragmatically, in contrast to the loopiness of Mr. Mayor. After all, I believe it was radio talker Dennis Prager who said, “Common sense is conservatism.”  As mayor, Barr suggests having fewer bike lanes, coffee outlets that sell only coffee, movie theaters with more than one screen, not as many stores for dogs, but more big box outlets. In short, she wants Portland to be a practical city.

“I’ve been to a lot of places, but nothing’s like this,” she complains. “Everybody’s just lost in a dream world.”

And finally, I’d like to acknowledge the regular but all but anonymous supporting performers on the program who live in the Portland area, IFC calls them the Citizens of Portlandia. They are the show’s answer to the John Ford Stock Company. These actors, who arrive like old friends, include Henry Cottrell, Kristine Levine, Angel Bouchet, Jedediah Aaker, and Sam Adams, who plays Mr. Mayor’s assistant. He was the real mayor of Portland from 2009-2012.

Season 8 was the only batch of episodes filmed during the Donald Trump presidency and I expected Portlandia to skewer what liberals, and yes, conservatives, see as low-hanging fruit ripe for the plucking. Amazingly, the Portlandia universe remains a Trump-free zone. Although Spyke–remember him?–reforms his old punk band, Riot Spray, fronted by the aforementioned Rollins with Nirvana’s Krist Novoselic playing bass, as a protest gesture against unspecified corruption in government. But he does so after first threatening to Iris to move to Canada.

In a jab at those dozens of celebrities who vowed to move north of the border if Trump won the presidency, Iris replies, “Spyke, no one moves to Canada.”

Seasons 1-7 of Portlandia are available on Netlfix, all of the episodes can be found on Comcast’s On Demand. This program is not for the little ones as there is some brief nudity here and there and some foul language.

John Ruberry, who has never had a chin beard, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.