An Incomplete Plan

Readability

An Incomplete Plan

by baldilocks

Inter­est­ing promo.

Peo­ple often tell them­selves that they will start their new diet, new exer­cise régime, or their new life, tomor­row. Either they are too stressed with stuff today, or need one last day to relax before per­ma­nently mak­ing the change. Then tomor­row comes, and the cycle repeats.

He’s not wrong.

Not being con­nected enough with your future self means that you can­not work towards acquir­ing what is nec­es­sary to reach your poten­tial. Every­thing we aim to become comes with some costs. Fail­ure to under­stand the cur­rent costs of your ideal future is rob­bing your­self of future freedom.

When peo­ple are asked to think about their future selves, they almost always say who they will be tomor­row is bet­ter than who they are today. They think they will be richer, hap­pier, more suc­cess­ful, and more pro­duc­tive as life goes on. Peo­ple rarely think that some ter­ri­ble life event, or a grad­ual decline is likely to occur, even if they are not tak­ing steps to improve themselves.

The piece is mostly about how to put finan­cial self-​improvement into action.

It got me to think­ing. What if a per­son did every­thing sug­gested in the arti­cle and met each planned goal in the time allot­ted to him/​her on this earth?

That per­son would still have to leave the earth. And assum­ing that there’s no after­life, the only good rea­son to reach finan­cial goals is to live well for a few years then leave some­thing for the children.

I sup­pose I shouldn’t look for meta­phys­i­cal mus­ings in what is, essen­tially, a finan­cial plan­ning pro­mo­tional piece. But when I read the title address­ing the “enslave­ment” of one’s future self, I couldn’t help but think of that other future self – the one which will still exist in Heaven or in outer dark­ness when this ‘self’ appears to be gone.

And it seems to me that plan­ning for that future self is not only more impor­tant, but indispensable.

Because that’s the only thing you will take with you when you leave here.

(Thanks to Zero Hedge)

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-​GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!

by baldilocks

Interesting promo.

People often tell themselves that they will start their new diet, new exercise regime, or their new life, tomorrow. Either they are too stressed with stuff today, or need one last day to relax before permanently making the change. Then tomorrow comes, and the cycle repeats.

He’s not wrong.

Not being connected enough with your future self means that you cannot work towards acquiring what is necessary to reach your potential. Everything we aim to become comes with some costs. Failure to understand the current costs of your ideal future is robbing yourself of future freedom.

When people are asked to think about their future selves, they almost always say who they will be tomorrow is better than who they are today. They think they will be richer, happier, more successful, and more productive as life goes on. People rarely think that some terrible life event, or a gradual decline is likely to occur, even if they are not taking steps to improve themselves.

The piece is mostly about how to put financial self-improvement into action.

It got me to thinking. What if a person did everything suggested in the article and met each planned goal in the time allotted to him/her on this earth?

That person would still have to leave the earth. And assuming that there’s no afterlife, the only good reason to reach financial goals is to live well for a few years then leave something for the children.

I suppose I shouldn’t look for metaphysical musings in what is, essentially, a financial planning promotional piece. But when I read the title addressing the “enslavement” of one’s future self, I couldn’t help but think of that other future self – the one which will still exist in Heaven or in outer darkness when this ‘self’ appears to be gone.

And it seems to me that planning for that future self is not only more important, but indispensable.

Because that’s the only thing you will take with you when you leave here.

(Thanks to Zero Hedge)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!