Telling the story

by Ellen Kolb | April 26th, 2018

Readability

Telling the story

I hate the terms “ableism” and “implicit bias.” They smack of lin­guis­tic and polit­i­cal trendi­ness. But now comes Britain’s National Health Ser­vice to show us what those words mean, and sud­denly they’re men­ac­ing, not trendy.

As I write this, Alfie Evans still lives in spite of the best efforts of the NHS. I hope that he’s in the arms of his lov­ing par­ents. Even a child with dis­abil­i­ties who’s been writ­ten off by his doc­tors deserves that much. As for the peo­ple who are try­ing to rush this child to the exit doors, Pete has summed them up nicely.

Alfie’s fam­ily didn’t ask to be in a posi­tion of hav­ing to defend their child’s right to nutri­tion and hydra­tion, or to defend their own right to have cus­tody of their son. But they’re fight­ing back, pub­licly. They’re telling their son’s story. That’s the least and the most they can do.

When health care providers for a dis­abled child like Alfie deem that care is “futile,” and when the child’s par­ents are then denied the right to take their child to another facil­ity that has agreed to accept him, then I know the con­trol­ling ethic is “bet­ter dead than dis­abled.”

Don’t think this is a story from Britain that has no rel­e­vance here. When nutri­tion and hydra­tion are con­sid­ered to be med­ical treat­ments instead of ordi­nary care — and some states have writ­ten that into statute — the risk increases that what’s hap­pen­ing to Alfie could hap­pen to anyone’s dis­abled child or par­ent or part­ner.

It’s ask­ing a lot, for a fam­ily to sur­ren­der its pri­vacy as a child is dying or crit­i­cally ill. But no doc­tor or hos­pi­tal or insurer or judge should be able to count on that pri­vacy to screen them from scrutiny when it comes to deny­ing food and water to a dis­abled patient. When that per­fect storm of dis­abil­ity and bad law strikes, may we have the guts to tell our loved one’s story and to push back on the so-​called experts, as Alfie’s par­ents are doing.

Ellen Kolb is a writer and pro-​life activist. She cov­ers New Hamp­shire pub­lic pol­icy on the life issues at leav​en​forth​e​loaf​.com.

You can sup­port inde­pen­dent jour­nal­ism and DTG’s Mag­nif­i­cent Team by hit­ting DaTip­Jar. Thanks!

I hate the terms “ableism” and “implicit bias.” They smack of linguistic and political trendiness. But now comes Britain’s National Health Service to show us what those words mean, and suddenly they’re menacing, not trendy. 

As I write this, Alfie Evans still lives in spite of the best efforts of the NHS. I hope that he’s in the arms of his loving parents. Even a child with disabilities who’s been written off by his doctors deserves that much. As for the people who are trying to rush this child to the exit doors, Pete has summed them up nicely. 

Alfie’s family didn’t ask to be in a position of having to defend their child’s right to nutrition and hydration, or to defend their own right to have custody of their son. But they’re fighting back, publicly. They’re telling their son’s story. That’s the least and the most they can do.

When health care providers for a disabled child like Alfie deem that care is “futile,” and when the child’s parents are then denied the right to take their child to another facility that has agreed to accept him, then I know the controlling ethic is “better dead than disabled.”  

Don’t think this is a story from Britain that has no relevance here. When nutrition and hydration are considered to be medical treatments instead of ordinary care – and some states have written that into statute – the risk increases that what’s happening to Alfie could happen to anyone’s disabled child or parent or partner. 

It’s asking a lot, for a family to surrender its privacy as a child is dying or critically ill. But no doctor or hospital or insurer or judge should be able to count on that privacy to screen them from scrutiny when it comes to denying food and water to a disabled patient. When that perfect storm of disability and bad law strikes, may we have the guts to tell our loved one’s story and to push back on the so-called experts, as Alfie’s parents are doing.

Ellen Kolb is a writer and pro-life activist. She covers New Hampshire public policy on the life issues at leavenfortheloaf.com.  

You can support independent journalism and DTG’s Magnificent Team by hitting DaTipJar. Thanks!

Comments are closed.

Buy My Book!

Buy My Book!

Hit DaTipJar and Support Conservative Journalism & Opinion




Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,147 other subscribers

DH Gate Dot Com, Online Shopping

Cheap ecigarette from China - DHgate

Best Grassroots Blogs

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Catholic CD of the Month

Know your Catholic Faith

Da Pages

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Donald Trump Calls on DaTechGuy Worcester MA

 
%d bloggers like this: