By John Ruberry

A major story broke last week, and while the mainstream media dutifully reported on it, there was no blanket coverage, unlike in the case of the guilty plea of Trump campaign hanger-on, George Papadopolous, one of the big catches of Robert Mueller’s Russian collusion probe.

What was that big breaking news? Recently-retired Senate Intelligence Committee staffer James Wolfe, who National Review’s Andrew McCarthy calls “a textbook swamp creature,” was arrested for allegedly lying to the FBI. Wolfe worked for the Senate Intelligence Committee for 29 years and he’s suspected of being a longtime leaker of classified information to reporters.

One of those journalists may have been Ali Watkins, 26, a Washington-based New York Times writer. As part of the Wolfe investigation, several years of telephone and email records belonging to Watkins were seized by federal investigators. The Committee to Protect Journalists says it fears the move “could be an opening salvo in an ongoing battle over reporters’ ability to protect their sources.”

Ah, about that source: In an article about the mainstream media uproar about the seizure, The Times, in the seventh paragraph of that piece, admitted about Watkins, “She and Mr. Wolfe had been in a three-year relationship, which drew the attention of prosecutors who were investigating unauthorized leaks from the Senate Intelligence Committee, including articles that Ms. Watkins had written for two previous employers, Politico and BuzzFeed News.” Yes, Little Red Watkins was inappropriately involved with the Big Bad Wolfe.

Oh, Wolfe is 57.

The Old Gray Lady also disclosed in that article that Watkins was informed in February that those electronic records of hers had been seized. After speaking to her attorney, Watkins decided not to tell the Times. Left undiscussed is whether she told anyone at the Times that she was involved in a relationship with Wolfe. Buzzfeed and Politico knew.

The mainstream media is comprised of phonies and frauds. Had Watkins been an FBI agent investigating Wolfe, they’d be calling for her dismissal. But Watkins is still on the job–on the same beat–which is federal law enforcement. No suspension, no transfer to the sports department or local school coverage for the Times for her.

Here’s the big question: Did the New York Times know that Watkins and Wolfe had that “relationship,” which I assume was of a sexual nature, before she was hired? Did they know before Wolfe’s indictment?

The media plays tough when it discovers blood in the water surrounding political figures, particularly ones it despises, such as President Donald Trump. But when a member their club is caught acting unethically it just circles the wagons and moves into protection mode.

Trump is right. The swamp needs to be drained. The Deep State needs to be dethroned.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Expert on Gud’s Laws, no clue on the types of DNA

It’s become practically a cliche in media and the left that to believe in religion is to be a “science denier”.  This conveniently forgets that that men of faith have been men of science for centuries and that the university system itself came from the Catholic church.

That’s why I think this story is going to get little or no play outside of faith or conservative circles:

Landmark new research that involves analyzing millions of DNA barcodes has debunked much about what we know today about the evolution of species.

In a massive genetic study, senior research associate at the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller University Mark Stoeckle and University of Basel geneticist David Thaler discovered that virtually 90 percent of all animals on Earth appeared at right around the same time.

More specifically, they found out that 9 out of 10 animal species on the planet came to being at the same time as humans did some 100,000 to 200,000 years ago.

The article goes into detail about how this was discovered, the full study itself has been published in the journal Human Evolution and is available here, it’s conclusion:

Science greedily seizes simplicity among complexities. Speciation occurs via alter native pathways distinct in terms of the number of genes involved and the abruptness of transitions [148]. Nuclear variance in modern humans varies by loci in part due to unequal selection [149] and the linkage of neutral sites to those that undergo differential selection. Complexity is the norm when dealing with variance of the nuclear ensemble [150-154]. It is remarkable that despite the diversity of speciation mechanisms and path ways the mitochondrial sequence variance in almost all extant animal species should be constrained within narrow parameters.
Mostly synonymous and apparently neutral variation in mitochondria within species shows a similar quantitative pattern across the entire animal kingdom. The pattern is that that most—over 90% in the best characterized groups—of the approximately five million barcode sequences cluster into groups with between 0.0% and 0.5% variance as measured by APD, with an average APD of 0.2%

Science being science further study of these results certainly is warranted and the conclusion based on the evidece that 90% of all species appeared at the same time in study is not the same as concluding that:

Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth all kinds of living creatures: cattle, creeping things, and wild animals of all kinds.” And so it happened: God made all kinds of wild animals, all kinds of cattle, and all kinds of creeping things of the earth. God saw how good it was.

Then God said: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, and the cattle, and over all the wild animals and all the creatures that crawl on the ground.”

Genesis 1:24-26

was the cause of these results, as our skeptical humanists friends will no doubt rightly tell us.  So by all means continue the research and let it go where it may.

But before you get your hopes up about debunking this study you might want to read what I thought was the most significant quote concerning this study the article at Tech Times:  (emphasis mine)

“This conclusion is very surprising,” says Thaler, “and I fought against it as hard as I could.” 

In other words this professor realizing what the conclusions from his data implied did all he could to debunk this unexpected conclusion short of altering the data itself, but being a scientist looking for results rather than a person seeking to validate his own opinions was forced to come to the conclusions published herein.

I have no idea if Professor Thaler is a disciple of Christ or a disciple of Moses but he is without a question a disciple of Feynman who said

It doesn’t matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn’t matter how smart you are. If it doesn’t agree with experiment, it’s wrong.

Or to put it another way, conventional wisdom is always correct right up until the moment it’s not.

Via Weirddave at Ace of Spade