On Loyalty

Readability

On Loyalty

[cap­tion id=“attachment_108425” align=“aligncenter” width=“300”] Same old story.[/caption]

by baldilocks

Since yes­ter­day, the lat­est in Don­ald Trump news is that for­mer White House aide and Appren­tice star Omarosa Manigault-​Newman is about to pub­lish a book — title: Unhinged – a tell-​all on the Trump Admin­is­tra­tion. One of her accu­sa­tions is that Don­ald Trump repeat­edly used the n-​word on the Appren­tice set and that there is cel­lu­loid proof of it. Her sto­ries have been incon­sis­tent.

There’s so much sor­did­ness com­ing off this story that I can smell it from here and I have no desire to recap the ping-​pong ball rev­e­la­tions that pop up every few minutes.

This story does, how­ever, have me think­ing about a cou­ple of con­cepts whose time has long past.

Loy­alty. Allegiance.

Out­side of our mil­i­tary, there are very few who give these con­cepts, these virtues any con­sid­er­a­tion at all, much less try to incor­po­rate them into deal­ings with oth­ers. I said this ten years ago.

Peo­ple who have been called into mil­i­tary ser­vice or vol­un­teer for it seem to have a more vis­ceral under­stand­ing of what dis­loy­alty indi­cates — whether life and limb are at stake or not. (…)

Out­side of the spir­i­tual con­se­quences [of betrayal], why are oath-​breakers so hated? Because when you act deci­sively in any endeavor, you’re expect­ing those who promise to assist [you] to do just that.

I’ve got your back.” That expres­sion isn’t slang. It’s a short form of say­ing that you’re pro­tect­ing another’s blind side — the back side; the “six” — of an ally, whether it’s a sub­or­di­nate, a supe­rior or an equal. Your liege (related to the word ‘alle­giance’) is depend­ing on you to indeed pro­tect that back side; and when, instead, you turn around and stab him in that side, you become a thing to be despised by friend and foe alike. Or at least that’s how it used to be.

Because, after all, who could trust a per­son who would do such a thing? Every­one keeps their lit­eral or fig­u­ra­tive front side to such a per­son for quite some time; she “bears watch­ing.” Earthly redemp­tion can only some­times be had and that’s after many deeds of repen­tance and the pas­sage of time.

But break­ing a trust seems to be no big deal anymore.

And that is what galls me about this Omarosa sit­u­a­tion — yes, even more that the alle­ga­tion of the usage of the n-​word. Don­ald Trump has given this woman a job, not once, but twice. And, she does this?

I guess I shouldn’t be shocked, but it’s more than shock­ing. It’s like watch­ing a drunken woman curse out a room full of din­ner guests and then barf all over the food on the din­ner table. You just want to turn away and get out the door.

On Twit­ter, I’ve spec­u­lated that Manigault-​Newman might be play­ing a role for the pres­i­dent; that she’s keep­ing media eyes focused on her, and off the Admin­is­tra­tion. If that turns out to be so, both she and the pres­i­dent should win Oscars.

But I’m begin­ning to doubt that. Occam’s Razor.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-​GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!

Same old story.

by baldilocks

Since yesterday, the latest in Donald Trump news is that former White House aide and Apprentice star Omarosa Manigault-Newman is about to publish a book — title: Unhinged — a tell-all on the Trump Administration. One of her accusations is that Donald Trump repeatedly used the n-word on the Apprentice set and that there is celluloid proof of it. Her stories have been inconsistent.

There’s so much sordidness coming off this story that I can smell it from here and I have no desire to recap the ping-pong ball revelations that pop up every few minutes.

This story does, however, have me thinking about a couple of concepts whose time has long past.

Loyalty. Allegiance.

Outside of our military, there are very few who give these concepts, these virtues any consideration at all, much less try to incorporate them into dealings with others. I said this ten years ago.

People who have been called into military service or volunteer for it seem to have a more visceral understanding of what disloyalty indicates — whether life and limb are at stake or not. (…)

Outside of the spiritual consequences [of betrayal], why are oath-breakers so hated? Because when you act decisively in any endeavor, you’re expecting those who promise to assist [you] to do just that.

“I’ve got your back.” That expression isn’t slang. It’s a short form of saying that you’re protecting another’s blind side—the back side; the “six”—of an ally, whether it’s a subordinate, a superior or an equal. Your liege (related to the word ‘allegiance’) is depending on you to indeed protect that back side; and when, instead, you turn around and stab him in that side, you become a thing to be despised by friend and foe alike. Or at least that’s how it used to be.

Because, after all, who could trust a person who would do such a thing? Everyone keeps their literal or figurative front side to such a person for quite some time; she “bears watching.” Earthly redemption can only sometimes be had and that’s after many deeds of repentance and the passage of time.

But breaking a trust seems to be no big deal anymore.

And that is what galls me about this Omarosa situation — yes, even more that the allegation of the usage of the n-word. Donald Trump has given this woman a job, not once, but twice. And, she does this?

I guess I shouldn’t be shocked, but it’s more than shocking. It’s like watching a drunken woman curse out a room full of dinner guests and then barf all over the food on the dinner table. You just want to turn away and get out the door.

On Twitter, I’ve speculated that Manigault-Newman might be playing a role for the president; that she’s keeping media eyes focused on her, and off the Administration. If that turns out to be so, both she and the president should win Oscars.

But I’m beginning to doubt that. Occam’s Razor.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!