Sorry Senator Warren, Climate Change Did Not Cause the Tornado that Devastated My Town

by Jon Fournier | August 16th, 2018

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Sorry Senator Warren, Climate Change Did Not Cause the Tornado that Devastated My Town

[cap­tion id=“attachment_108501” align=“alignright” width=“300”] Photo is from the Boston Globe arti­cle –Tor­nado strikes in Web­ster and Dud­ley, destroy­ing dreams among its dam­age – Taken by Craig F. Walker/​Globe staff[/caption]

On Sat­ur­day, August 4th, a tor­nado tore through the town of Web­ster Mass­a­chu­setts, doing exten­sive dam­age to the town’s Main Street. Two large build­ings were dam­aged so bad they were torn down within hours and another two large build­ings were so badly dam­aged they will be torn down in the very near future. It is a mir­a­cle there were no deaths and only one minor injury.

Web­ster Mass­a­chu­setts is my home town and the town I’m liv­ing in now. My house, which only lies 500 yards from where the edge of the tor­nado made its clos­est pass, was raked by out­flow winds that were about hur­ri­cane force. Con­sid­er­ing the tor­nado was 300 yards wide, it was a near miss. Com­pared to the 45 indi­vid­u­als whose homes were destroyed and lost every­thing, I was extremely fortunate.

On August 9th, a United States con­gres­sional del­e­ga­tion, con­sist­ing of Sen­a­tor Eliz­a­beth War­ren, Richard Neal, and Jim McGov­ern, held a closed door meet­ing with mem­bers of the town gov­ern­ment and local emer­gency offi­cials to dis­cuss relief efforts. After the meet­ing they met with the press. The local TV sta­tions broad­casted some of the press brief­ing. In those clips the del­e­ga­tion did what every con­gres­sional del­e­ga­tion does, talk about recov­ery efforts and bring­ing in money to help rebuild. The news broad­casts left out a large por­tion of what the three had to say. I found this tran­script of the full press brief­ing on Con­gress­man Richard Neal’s Web­site. This por­tion of the tran­script angered me a great deal:

All three law­mak­ers fur­ther raised con­cerns about the num­ber of tor­na­does that have touched down in the state in recent years, argu­ing that the storms under­score the impacts of cli­mate change.

This is a reminder that cli­mate change has real, tan­gi­ble impli­ca­tions,” War­ren said. “We’re watch­ing more severe weather, we’re watch­ing — over and over — these ‘never hap­pened before events’ or ‘hap­pens once every 100 years’ and now, they keep hap­pen­ing again and again and again. There are real costs to a chang­ing climate.”

War­ren added that such weather events are why the United States should be a leader on climate-​related issues.

This is not a time for us to turn our backs on the needs of cre­at­ing a sus­tain­able world for all of us,” she said.

It out­raged me that the three of them, with Sen­a­tor War­ren as the chief spokesman, used the tragedy that hap­pened in my town to push cli­mate change. It out­raged me that our United States Sen­a­tor would use this tragedy to blather on about non­sense that mas­quer­ades as sci­en­tific truth. It took me only two Google searches and five min­utes to com­pletely dis­credit all of her claims.

As you can see from this National Oceanic and Atmos­pheric Admin­is­tra­tion link, after peak­ing between 1990 and 2010, the num­ber of tor­na­does nation­wide has decreased. The past few years the num­ber of tor­na­does has been low. The pro­jected num­ber of tor­na­does for this year, based on the num­ber through June, will be below average.

Accord­ing to data from NOAA’s Storm Pre­dic­tion Cen­ter, dur­ing June, there were 166 pre­lim­i­nary tor­nado reports. This is below the 19912010 aver­age of 243 for the month. Tor­na­does occurred through­out the month, with almost every day expe­ri­enc­ing at least one tor­nado due to upper-​level lows and fronts mov­ing through the Great Plains and Mid­west. How­ever, there were no large-​scale out­breaks and no tornado-​related fatal­i­ties. For the year-​to-​date, there have been 596 pre­lim­i­nary tor­nado reports, below the aver­age of 818. Depend­ing on the final con­fir­ma­tion rate, the January-​June tor­nado count could be the low­est since 2002 when there were just 468 tornadoes.

A lot has been made of the fact that three tor­na­does in a short period touched down in Mass­a­chu­setts. Many news­cast­ers have accom­pa­nied Sen­a­tor War­ren in spec­u­lat­ing that this is proof of cat­a­strophic man caused cli­mate change. This arti­cle in the Boston Globe, of all places, dis­cred­its these claims.

The tor­nado that tore through Web­ster and Dud­ley on Sat­ur­day was the third twister to hit Mass­a­chu­setts within a 10-​day stretch.

That may seem like an alarm­ing sta­tis­tic, but so far this year, tor­nado activ­ity in the state is roughly in line with his­tor­i­cal trends.

This is really kind of typ­i­cal actu­ally,” said Bill Simp­son, mete­o­rol­o­gist at the National Weather Service’s bureau in Norton….On aver­age, between two and three tor­na­does hit Mass­a­chu­setts annu­ally, accord­ing to weather ser­vice records that date back to the 1950s.

Of course, the num­bers fluc­tu­ate year to year.

You can have years with none and then you can have years with six or eight tor­na­does,” Simp­son said.

This cli­mate change hys­te­ria is noth­ing more than an excuse to push social­ism and a gov­ern­ment takeover of more and more of our econ­omy through over­bear­ing reg­u­la­tions. Wind­mills and solar instal­la­tions are gigan­tic waste of money which require vast gov­ern­ment subsidies.

****If you would like to help those in town who lost every­thing, please check out this link on the offi­cial Web­ster Town Website.

Photo is from the Boston Globe article -Tornado strikes in Webster and Dudley, destroying dreams among its damage – Taken by Craig F. Walker/Globe staff

On Saturday, August 4th, a tornado tore through the town of Webster Massachusetts, doing extensive damage to the town’s Main Street.  Two large buildings were damaged so bad they were torn down within hours and another two large buildings were so badly damaged they will be torn down in the very near future.  It is a miracle there were no deaths and only one minor injury.

Webster Massachusetts is my home town and the town I’m living in now.  My house, which only lies 500 yards from where the edge of the tornado made its closest pass, was raked by outflow winds that were about hurricane force.  Considering the tornado was 300 yards wide, it was a near miss.  Compared to the 45 individuals whose homes were destroyed and lost everything, I was extremely fortunate.

On August 9th, a United States congressional delegation, consisting of Senator Elizabeth Warren, Richard Neal, and Jim McGovern, held a closed door meeting with members of the town government and local emergency officials to discuss relief efforts.  After the meeting they met with the press.  The local TV stations broadcasted some of the press briefing.  In those clips the delegation did what every congressional delegation does, talk about recovery efforts and bringing in money to help rebuild.  The news broadcasts left out a large portion of what the three had to say.  I found this transcript of the full press briefing on Congressman Richard Neal’s Website.  This portion of the transcript angered me a great deal:

All three lawmakers further raised concerns about the number of tornadoes that have touched down in the state in recent years, arguing that the storms underscore the impacts of climate change.

“This is a reminder that climate change has real, tangible implications,” Warren said. “We’re watching more severe weather, we’re watching — over and over — these ‘never happened before events’ or ‘happens once every 100 years’ and now, they keep happening again and again and again. There are real costs to a changing climate.”

Warren added that such weather events are why the United States should be a leader on climate-related issues.

“This is not a time for us to turn our backs on the needs of creating a sustainable world for all of us,” she said.

It outraged me that the three of them, with Senator Warren as the chief spokesman, used the tragedy that happened in my town to push climate change.  It outraged me that our United States Senator would use this tragedy to blather on about nonsense that masquerades as scientific truth.  It took me only two Google searches and five minutes to completely discredit all of her claims.

As you can see from this National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration link, after peaking between 1990 and 2010, the number of tornadoes nationwide has decreased.   The past few years the number of tornadoes has been low.  The projected number of tornadoes for this year, based on the number through June, will be below average.

According to data from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center, during June, there were 166 preliminary tornado reports. This is below the 1991-2010 average of 243 for the month. Tornadoes occurred throughout the month, with almost every day experiencing at least one tornado due to upper-level lows and fronts moving through the Great Plains and Midwest. However, there were no large-scale outbreaks and no tornado-related fatalities. For the year-to-date, there have been 596 preliminary tornado reports, below the average of 818. Depending on the final confirmation rate, the January-June tornado count could be the lowest since 2002 when there were just 468 tornadoes.

A lot has been made of the fact that three tornadoes in a short period touched down in Massachusetts.  Many newscasters have accompanied Senator Warren in speculating that this is proof of catastrophic man caused climate change.  This article in the Boston Globe, of all places, discredits these claims.

The tornado that tore through Webster and Dudley on Saturday was the third twister to hit Massachusetts within a 10-day stretch.

That may seem like an alarming statistic, but so far this year, tornado activity in the state is roughly in line with historical trends.

“This is really kind of typical actually,” said Bill Simpson, meteorologist at the National Weather Service’s bureau in Norton….On average, between two and three tornadoes hit Massachusetts annually, according to weather service records that date back to the 1950s.

Of course, the numbers fluctuate year to year.

“You can have years with none and then you can have years with six or eight tornadoes,” Simpson said.

This climate change hysteria is nothing more than an excuse to push socialism and a government takeover of more and more of our economy through overbearing regulations.  Windmills and solar installations are gigantic waste of money which require vast government subsidies.

****If you would like to help those in town who lost everything, please check out this link on the official Webster Town Website.

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