Movement

Readability

Movement

by baldilocks

I plan on com­ing back to Cal­i­for­nia after my upcom­ing Odyssey, but it’s easy to under­stand why this is hap­pen­ing.

Richer Amer­i­cans are mov­ing to the coasts while poorer fam­i­lies are relo­cat­ing to the Rust Belt as part of a national gen­tri­fi­ca­tion trend that is divid­ing the haves and have-​nots geo­graph­i­cally, accord­ing to a new study.

The phe­nom­e­non is called ‘income sort­ing’ by a researcher at Build​Zoom​.com, and it means that the peo­ple who move to more expen­sive metrop­o­lises like New York and Los Ange­les are increas­ingly wealthy, while those who are mov­ing into more depressed inland cities are mak­ing less money than those who are leav­ing them behind.

What we are see­ing hap­pen­ing is the pop­u­la­tion being sep­a­rated into the haves and the have-​nots,’ study author Issi Romem said. ‘The haves are increas­ingly being con­cen­trated in the expen­sive coastal cities.’

The study uses San Fran­cisco as an exam­ple, but costs are only part of the prob­lem there, as we know.

The prob­lem is exac­er­bated by high hous­ing costs in coastal cities, where demand is high, sup­ply is low and ‘home­buy­ers and renters in these met­ros com­pete with each other over a smaller hous­ing stock, bid­ding up prices, and push­ing out those who are the least finan­cially able,’ the study said.

The result is that lower income peo­ple are then deterred from mov­ing to those cities, fur­ther exac­er­bat­ing the prob­lem and cre­at­ing a never-​ending cycle of ris­ing prices for the wealthy who are left behind. Even­tu­ally these cities could become unaf­ford­able for all but the wealth­i­est Americans.

The rea­son I stayed here after los­ing my house in 2014 is the same rea­son I’m com­ing back after my trip: to be close to my church. And God has pro­vided for me.

But I can’t blame any­one else for quit­ting CA and all the other social­ist utopias around the nation. The Rust Belt is here.

And, per­son­ally, I think that many of the rich will wake up and leave, too. Or be trapped in the gilded cages.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-​GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!

by baldilocks

I plan on coming back to California after my upcoming Odyssey, but it’s easy to understand why this is happening.

Richer Americans are moving to the coasts while poorer families are relocating to the Rust Belt as part of a national gentrification trend that is dividing the haves and have-nots geographically, according to a new study.

The phenomenon is called ‘income sorting’ by a researcher at BuildZoom.com, and it means that the people who move to more expensive metropolises like New York and Los Angeles are increasingly wealthy, while those who are moving into more depressed inland cities are making less money than those who are leaving them behind.

‘What we are seeing happening is the population being separated into the haves and the have-nots,’ study author Issi Romem said. ‘The haves are increasingly being concentrated in the expensive coastal cities.’

The study uses San Francisco as an example, but costs are only part of the problem there, as we know.

The problem is exacerbated by high housing costs in coastal cities, where demand is high, supply is low and ‘homebuyers and renters in these metros compete with each other over a smaller housing stock, bidding up prices, and pushing out those who are the least financially able,’ the study said.

The result is that lower income people are then deterred from moving to those cities, further exacerbating the problem and creating a never-ending cycle of rising prices for the wealthy who are left behind. Eventually these cities could become unaffordable for all but the wealthiest Americans.

The reason I stayed here after losing my house in 2014 is the same reason I’m coming back after my trip: to be close to my church. And God has provided for me.

But I can’t blame anyone else for quitting CA and all the other socialist utopias around the nation. The Rust Belt is here.

And, personally, I think that many of the rich will wake up and leave, too. Or be trapped in the gilded cages.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-GoDaddy host!

Or hit Juliette’s!