I speak to Barbara Golder Author of Dying for Compassion (part of the lady doc series) at the 2018 Catholic Marketing Network Trade Show in Lancaster PA

Her Web Site is here

You can buy her books here


The Catholic Marketing Network Interview Bloglist

Sept 3rd Voices of CMN 2018 Barbara Golder Author: Dying for Compassion

Sept 2nd Voices of CMN 2018 Barbara Kudwa Author of Finding God Anew

Sept 1st Voices of CMN 2018 Anne Feaster Co-Author of Spiritual Deceptions

Aug 31st Voices of CMN 2018 AJ Cattapan Author 7 Riddles to Nowhere

Aug 30th Voices of CMN 2018 Virginia Lieto Author Finding Patience

Aug 29th Voices of CMN 2018 Tony Agnesi: Author: A Storytellers Guide to Joyful Service

Aug 28th Voices of CMN 2018 Steven Ryan Author The Madonna Files and Mystic Post blog

Aug 27th Michael Manley Author: The Resurrection Network

Aug 26th Voices of CMN 2018 Maurice Prater Author: Saved by the Alphabet

Aug 25th Voices of CMN 2018 Catholic Author Marge Fenelon

Aug 24th: Voices of CMN 2018 Linda Rose Author: Strength for your Journey

Aug 23rd Voices at CMN 2018 Kevin Rush Author: The Lance and the Veil

Aug 22nd Voices of CMN 2018 Kendra Von Esh Author: Am I Catholic

Aug 21st Voices of CMN 2018 Jennifer Angelle Hugs from Heaven

Aug 20th Voices of CMN 2018 John and Claire Grabowski Authors of One Body

Aug 19th Voices of CMN 2018 Fr. Bill McCarthy Author: God Bless America

Aug 18th Voices of CMN 2018 Fr. Chris Alar Author: After Suicide

Aug 17th Voices of CMN 2018 Dr Hellen Hoffner Author Catholic Traditions and Treasures

Aug 16th Voices of CMN 2018 Chris Faddis Author: It is well Life in the Storm

Aug 15th Voices of CMN 2018 Bud McFarlane and Ginny Mooney on the Messiah mini series

Aug 14th Voices of CMN 2018 Virginia Pillars Author Broken Brain Fortified Faith

Aug 13th Voices of CMN 2018 David Tittle Musicians for Life new CD “It’s a Life”

Aug 12th Voices of CMN 2018 Novena for Our Nation Starting Aug 15th & Rosary Coast to Coast Oct 7th

Aug 11th Voices at the 2018 CMN Moria Noonan Co-Author: Spiritual Deceptions

Aug 10th Voices of CMN 2018 Lesliea Wahl Author: An Unexpected Role

Aug 9th Voices of CMN 2018 Gerard Hasenhuetti Compassionate Capitalism The Intersection of Economic Growth and Social Justice

Aug 8th
Voices at CMN 2018 Ruth Apollonia Author of Annabelle of Anchony

Voices at CMN 2018 Kimberly Cook My Hand in Yours Yours in Mine Catholic Authors

Aug 6th Voices at CMN 2018 August Turak Author: Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim and the Purpose of Life

Aug 5th Voices at CMN 2018 Fr. Edward Looney Author A Heart Like Mary’s

Aug 4th: Karina Fabian of the Catholic Writers Guild or A Preview of Blogging Attractions


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Tropical storm Gordon.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT – Last night as I was watching LSU’s trouncing of the Miami Hurricanes on television, I received a text message from a friend which included a screenshot of the new tropical storm in the Gulf, Gordon, with the question “Am I the only one who can feel a faster heartbeat and creeping anxiety over a pic like this?”

It’s an ongoing group text thread with five of us teachers and every one of us knew exactly what she meant.  I’d been watching that cone of probability all day long as it centered this storm right over New Orleans.

It’s only a tropical storm, it’s not a hurricane, and it’s probably not that big of a deal, but this is what living in Louisiana is like, especially after Katrina which was much in the news the past week with the thirteenth anniversary of that devastating storm.

Add to that the flooding along the south Louisiana coast with Harvey last year and, well, we can be forgiven if we look at tropical storm warnings a little differently than normal.

The New York Times has a story today about Hurricane Harvey and about how many poor neighborhoods in Houston are “slow to recover” :

A survey last month showed that 27 percent of Hispanic Texans whose homes were badly damaged reported that those homes remained unsafe to live in, compared to 20 percent of blacks and 11 percent of whites. There were similar disparities with income: 50 percent of lower-income respondents said they weren’t getting the help they needed, compared to 32 percent of those with higher incomes, according to the survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Episcopal Health Foundation.

And while Louisiana escaped the brunt of Hurricane Harvey, areas along the coast received up to twenty-two inches of rain which just added insult to injury after the devastating 2016 Louisiana floods.  In August 2016 much of south Louisiana received devastating rain totals as a slow-moving storm drenched the state and left many homes uninhabitable.

So, yes.  Whenever we see those weather graphics with those cones of probability slamming right into our fragile coast, we get a little nervous.

It doesn’t stop us in our tracks, though.  We are used to this.  It comes with the territory (literally!) and the flooding and storms are part of our routine.  We prepare, we wait, we watch, and sometimes the predictions are wrong.

But I do believe that Katrina changed things for us.  I’m in northwest Louisiana and so Katrina as a weather event didn’t affect me very much, but Katrina as a human drama certainly did.  I’ll never ever forget the haunted eyes of those refugee children in my classrooms.

With this little storm, Gordon, who is making its way over the coast this week and up into my corner of the state this time, what I worry about most is our very fragile coastline and vanishing wetlands.  I wonder why we have no better answers to protect them and I worry about places like Isle de Jean Charles, for example, that are already so endangered.  What must those people be thinking as they look at the weather forecast this week?

In the meantime, we celebrate our LSU Tigers’ performance last night, and I think I will go start a pot of gumbo and hope that the storm moves quickly through.

 

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport and is the author of Cane River Bohemia.  Follow her on Instagram @patbecker25.

Sheriff Bart: Oh, baby, you’re so talented… and they are so dumb.

Blazing Saddles 1974

Because I’m on vacation (it’s so odd to be somewhere an not waiting to interview someone or have to work) I’m not paying attention to things as closely as I might but I was rather shocked to see this headline at Hotair:

Reports: Trump Allies Furious About Shots Taken At Him During McCain’s Funeral, Want Him To Respond

This headline seemed completely counterintuitive to me and in the Hotair article Allahpundit said exactly what I was thinking:

Trump is better off shrugging off the jabs and declining to return them. He won. He has nothing left to prove. Meghan’s shots at him weren’t taken from a position of strength, like when Obama goofed on him to his face at the 2011 White House Correspondents Dinner while official Washington laughed. They were taken from a position of weakness, in a moment of grief both for her dad and for the sort of political sensibility he represented, which is now also passing from the scene. That may explain why Ivanka and Jared felt comfortable showing up. They weren’t outnumbered. It was everyone else in the room who’s outnumbered.

Or put simply the worst thing Trump could do is counterattack here since it would change the narrative to one that favors his political victory to one that does not.

As this was very obvious to me I went to the Politico article that it linked to read it for myself and I kept waiting for quotes from Trump allies demanding that he go online and respond.

I saw this:

As Washington mourned McCain, Trump’s people grew angry. Some even hoped for — but didn’t get — a blistering tweet from the president. And they privately chastised Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, Trump’s daughter and son-in-law, for attending the senator’s memorial service.

“@realDonaldTrump ran for @POTUS ONE time and WON,” tweeted Katrina Pierson, an adviser to Trump’s campaign. “Some people will never recover from that.”

and I saw this

His friends and allies fumed. Trump had endured a week of criticism for his handling of McCain’s death, but the eulogy from the late senator’s daughter Meghan was the last straw, according to three people close to the White House.

But I looked high and low and I didn’t see anyone advocating Trump going on the attack against his own interest nor did Politico name such a person and that’s when I figured it out.

The people upset that Trump didn’t attack aren’t Trump’s “Allies”, it’s Politico and Trump’s enemies.

I surmise that the #nevertrump left completely expected a Trump counterattack and actually felt freer about attacking him because they were sure they would be able to pivot any outrage to any counter attack that the President would make.

But Trump so far has been too smart to attack a woman upset at her father’s death and unless that changes it’s very likely that #mccainstone will be to #nevertrump in 2018 what Wellstone was to the Democrats in 2002.

I submit and suggest that Politico was trying to either trick Trump into changing his mind about responding or if that doesn’t work to try and create a new narrative with supporters of Trump being the villain that Trump refuses to be.

In other words, this entire story is fake news.

However this tweet is not

Apparently plan C for the left will be to normalize funerals as political events.  I’m sure this will play well with voters in swing states in 2018

How on earth does President Trump manage to get such stupid foes?



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