School Daze

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School Daze

As the fall semes­ter starts, I face the some­what vex­ing prob­lem of con­vinc­ing many stu­dents that what they have learned is mostly wrong.

Unlike some of my col­leagues, I try to keep my polit­i­cal views out of the classroom.

What I do, how­ever, is point the class toward diver­gent points of view, such as con­ser­v­a­tive ones that they prob­a­bly have never heard before.

In my media law class, for exam­ple, we talked about the nom­i­na­tion of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, start­ing with term, “Borked.” It is some­what ironic that Anthony Kennedy replaced Robert Bork as a nom­i­nee, and Cavanaugh will replace Kennedy.

For­tu­nately, the sound and the fury the Democ­rats mus­tered won’t stop Cavanaugh from get­ting to the pres­ti­gious bench. But I tired to tamp down the non­sense that the Democ­rats have put forward.

The class will ana­lyze the role of a “free and respon­si­ble press” — some­thing I hope they will take with them whether they go into jour­nal­ism or not.

In my inter­na­tional report­ing class, we dis­cussed the role of immi­gra­tion in Amer­i­can soci­ety — a topic the media and the Democ­rats have man­aged to mud­dle badly.

For exam­ple, I explained the var­i­ous paths to tem­po­rary and per­ma­nent visas and the appro­pri­ate way to citizenship.

We ana­lyzed the var­i­ous immi­grants who come to the United States and Philadel­phia. I asked what is the largest group of immi­grants com­ing to the city. The answer: China.

This week’s topic is ter­ror­ism. Unbe­knownst to them will be what many con­ser­v­a­tives know: the war on ter­ror­ism has been effec­tive. Al-​Qaeda and the self-​proclaimed Islamic State are unable to mount any sig­nif­i­cant attacks against U.S. cit­i­zens and inter­ests out­side of the country.

I hope that the stu­dents will get some use­ful infor­ma­tion from my years in the Mid­dle East and China with­out the defeatist polit­i­cal slant they’ve heard elsewhere.

As always, it will be an inter­est­ing ride. It’s time to buckle up!

As the fall semester starts, I face the somewhat vexing problem of convincing many students that what they have learned is mostly wrong.

Unlike some of my colleagues, I try to keep my political views out of the classroom.

What I do, however, is point the class toward divergent points of view, such as conservative ones that they probably have never heard before.

In my media law class, for example, we talked about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, starting with term, “Borked.” It is somewhat ironic that Anthony Kennedy replaced Robert Bork as a nominee, and Cavanaugh will replace Kennedy.

Fortunately, the sound and the fury the Democrats mustered won’t stop Cavanaugh from getting to the prestigious bench. But I tired to tamp down the nonsense that the Democrats have put forward.

The class will analyze the role of a “free and responsible press”—something I hope they will take with them whether they go into journalism or not.

In my international reporting class, we discussed the role of immigration in American society—a topic the media and the Democrats have managed to muddle badly.

For example, I explained the various paths to temporary and permanent visas and the appropriate way to citizenship.

We analyzed the various immigrants who come to the United States and Philadelphia. I asked what is the largest group of immigrants coming to the city. The answer: China.

This week’s topic is terrorism. Unbeknownst to them will be what many conservatives know: the war on terrorism has been effective. Al-Qaeda and the self-proclaimed Islamic State are unable to mount any significant attacks against U.S. citizens and interests outside of the country.

I hope that the students will get some useful information from my years in the Middle East and China without the defeatist political slant they’ve heard elsewhere.

As always, it will be an interesting ride. It’s time to buckle up!