Readability

The Ivory Tower and Truth

Over the past two weeks, I have seen first-​hand how acad­e­mia con­tin­ues to slide into the left­ist abyss.

A panel dis­cus­sion on 911 and a debate about Brett Kavanaugh under­lined how the ivory tower can neg­a­tively affect young minds.

The Depart­ment of Jour­nal­ism at Tem­ple Uni­ver­sity orga­nized the ses­sion on 9/​11, which was attended by about 100 peo­ple. I ini­tially agreed to par­tic­i­pate in the panel because of my long­time expe­ri­ence as a reporter in the Mid­dle East. But I relin­quished my role when one of my col­leagues objected to “three white men” as the only mem­bers of the group.

That’s aca­d­e­mic logic. Exper­tise doesn’t mat­ter; only diver­sity does except when it comes to diver­sity of opin­ion. Here is a report on the panel: https://​tem​ple​-news​.com/​t​e​m​p​l​e​-​c​o​m​m​u​n​i​t​y​-​r​e​m​e​m​b​ers-911-​at-​panel-​discussion/​

The pan­elists also made the fol­low­ing points:

–More peo­ple died in the Puerto Rican hur­ri­cane than on 9/​11, so there was no sig­nif­i­cant rea­son to com­mem­o­rate the events sur­round­ing the attack on the World Trade Cen­ter.
–The United States had slipped into “trib­al­ism” because Islam­o­pho­bia was ram­pant.
–Bush was bad; Trump is worse.

I have heard a lot of silli­ness in my time in the acad­emy, but this group was near the top of the pops.

Dur­ing the question-​and-​answer part of the pro­gram, I couldn’t resist try­ing to bring some bal­ance to the discussion.

Evil peo­ple want to do bad things to the United States, I said. They’re plan­ning them right now. For­tu­nately, secu­rity offi­cials and the U.S. mil­i­tary had stopped most of the bad peo­ple from doing bad things.

Let me under­line an impor­tant fact here. These are jour­nal­ism pro­fes­sors who are sup­posed to be teach­ing future reporters about accu­racy and facts. If the teach­ers believe this hokum, just imag­ine what they pass on to their students.

At least one stu­dent thanked me later for my com­ments. She intended to join the mil­i­tary upon grad­u­a­tion. At least I had touched one soul that day.

But there’s more. In my media law class, I ini­ti­ated a dis­cus­sion about the accu­sa­tions against Judge Kavanaugh.

For the vast major­ity of the stu­dents, it didn’t make any dif­fer­ence that the alleged inci­dent may have occurred 35 years ago. It didn’t make any dif­fer­ence that the alleged inci­dent hap­pened when both were teenagers. It didn’t make any dif­fer­ence that the accuser couldn’t remem­ber basic details. It didn’t make any dif­fer­ence that the accu­sa­tions might be polit­i­cally motivated.

Sim­ply put, in most of my stu­dents’ eyes, Kavanaugh is a bad guy.

It’s tough being a con­ser­v­a­tive in acad­e­mia, but I’ll con­tinue to fight the good fight!

Over the past two weeks, I have seen first-hand how academia continues to slide into the leftist abyss.

A panel discussion on 9/11 and a debate about Brett Kavanaugh underlined how the ivory tower can negatively affect young minds.

The Department of Journalism at Temple University organized the session on 9/11, which was attended by about 100 people. I initially agreed to participate in the panel because of my longtime experience as a reporter in the Middle East. But I relinquished my role when one of my colleagues objected to “three white men” as the only members of the group.

That’s academic logic. Expertise doesn’t matter; only diversity does except when it comes to diversity of opinion. Here is a report on the panel: https://temple-news.com/temple-community-remembers-9-11-at-panel-discussion/

The panelists also made the following points:

–More people died in the Puerto Rican hurricane than on 9/11, so there was no significant reason to commemorate the events surrounding the attack on the World Trade Center.
–The United States had slipped into “tribalism” because Islamophobia was rampant.
–Bush was bad; Trump is worse.

I have heard a lot of silliness in my time in the academy, but this group was near the top of the pops.

During the question-and-answer part of the program, I couldn’t resist trying to bring some balance to the discussion.

Evil people want to do bad things to the United States, I said. They’re planning them right now. Fortunately, security officials and the U.S. military had stopped most of the bad people from doing bad things.

Let me underline an important fact here. These are journalism professors who are supposed to be teaching future reporters about accuracy and facts. If the teachers believe this hokum, just imagine what they pass on to their students.

At least one student thanked me later for my comments. She intended to join the military upon graduation. At least I had touched one soul that day.

But there’s more. In my media law class, I initiated a discussion about the accusations against Judge Kavanaugh.

For the vast majority of the students, it didn’t make any difference that the alleged incident may have occurred 35 years ago. It didn’t make any difference that the alleged incident happened when both were teenagers. It didn’t make any difference that the accuser couldn’t remember basic details. It didn’t make any difference that the accusations might be politically motivated.

Simply put, in most of my students’ eyes, Kavanaugh is a bad guy.

It’s tough being a conservative in academia, but I’ll continue to fight the good fight!