My first race in eight years just might offer a lesson for you

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My first race in eight years just might offer a lesson for you

By John Ruberry

Get up off your arses men
Don’t let ‘em think you’re get­ting lazy
Get up out of your easy chairs
We gotta lot to do out there, well ain’t we.“
The Kinks, “Get Up.”

My Sun­day post here is a bit late because this morn­ing I ran a race – my first one since the 2010 Chicago Marathon.

I’ve been run­ning ten miles a day four times a week for a cou­ple of months now, so I’m in pretty good shape.

Although not race shape.

I had to dras­ti­cally cut down my run­ning eight years ago because of a torn menis­cus in my right knee paired with a stress frac­ture on my fight fibula.

Clearly I lean to the right.

So what race did I choose for my come­back? The World’s Largest Corn Maze 5K at the Richard­son Farm in Spring Grove, Illi­nois, just a few miles south of the Wis­con­sin border.

The race course has 250 turns. That’s over 80 turns per-​mile. Wow. What a great way to re-​tear a meniscus.

Even in Illi­nois few peo­ple are pay­ing atten­tion, so you prob­a­bly didn’t know that this is the Land of Lincoln’s bicen­ten­nial year. Illi­nois’ 200th birth­day was the theme of the maze, although I couldn’t ascer­tain that at ground level

Man, oh man, this was a tough race. Some of those turns were of the hair­pin vari­ety and there were some cir­cu­lar turns too. 250 turns? Why not just 200 Illi­nois bicen­ten­nial turns?

Yes, I fin­ished. And fin­ished well, com­ing in sec­ond place in my age group – 5559 – and gain­ing a medal for my effort.

This post might be turn­ing into a gloat­ing exer­cise, which is not my intent at all. For you, well, sea­soned guys and gals out there, there’s no need to believe that you are too old, tired, or banged-​up to par­tic­i­pate in ath­letic endeav­ors. Will you win an age group award in a race? Prob­a­bly not. Jim Fixx, who wrote the best sell­ing The Com­plete Book of Run­ning, fin­ished last in his first race. But since I started run­ning at an intense level, I feel bet­ter and I look better.

The same result might come your way.

And if you are young there is a les­son for you too. Now is the time to cre­ate healthy habits. I ran my first marathon when I was 28.

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs from Mor­ton Grove, Illi­nois at Marathon Pun­dit.

By John Ruberry

“Get up off your arses men
Don’t let ’em think you’re getting lazy
Get up out of your easy chairs
We gotta lot to do out there, well ain’t we.”
The Kinks, “Get Up.”

My Sunday post here is a bit late because this morning I ran a race–my first one since the 2010 Chicago Marathon.

I’ve been running ten miles a day four times a week for a couple of months now, so I’m in pretty good shape.

Although not race shape.

I had to drastically cut down my running eight years ago because of a torn meniscus in my right knee paired with a stress fracture on my fight fibula.

Clearly I lean to the right.

So what race did I choose for my comeback? The World’s Largest Corn Maze 5K at the Richardson Farm in Spring Grove, Illinois, just a few miles south of the Wisconsin border.

The race course has 250 turns. That’s over 80 turns per-mile. Wow. What a great way to re-tear a meniscus.

Even in Illinois few people are paying attention, so you probably didn’t know that this is the Land of Lincoln’s bicentennial year. Illinois’ 200th birthday was the theme of the maze, although I couldn’t ascertain that at ground level

Man, oh man, this was a tough race. Some of those turns were of the hairpin variety and there were some circular turns too. 250 turns? Why not just 200 Illinois bicentennial turns?

Yes, I finished. And finished well, coming in second place in my age group–55-59–and gaining a medal for my effort.

This post might be turning into a gloating exercise, which is not my intent at all. For you, well, seasoned guys and gals out there, there’s no need to believe that you are too old, tired, or banged-up to participate in athletic endeavors. Will you win an age group award in a race? Probably not. Jim Fixx, who wrote the best selling The Complete Book of Running, finished last in his first race. But since I started running at an intense level, I feel better and I look better.

The same result might come your way.

And if you are young there is a lesson for you too. Now is the time to create healthy habits. I ran my first marathon when I was 28.

John Ruberry regularly blogs from Morton Grove, Illinois at Marathon Pundit.