God Was Right

Readability

God Was Right

Again

by baldilocks

The tide is turn­ing in the “Believe Her” Wars.

John Doe and Jane Roe met at a fra­ter­nity party. The two, both referred to with com­mon legal pseu­do­nyms, danced and drank. Then they went upstairs to John’s room, where they had sex. Two days later, Jane filed a sex­ual mis­con­duct charge against John, con­tend­ing that she had been too drunk to con­sent. John disagreed.

After sev­eral months of inves­ti­ga­tion, the Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan found for Jane. John was forced to with­draw from the uni­ver­sity, just 13.5 cred­its shy of graduating.

But then John took a step that is becom­ing more com­mon among stu­dents who believe they have been harmed by tough poli­cies aimed at com­bat­ing cam­pus sex­ual assault. He hired a lawyer and took the uni­ver­sity to court, main­tain­ing his inno­cence and charg­ing the school had denied him even the rudi­ments of due process, specif­i­cally the right to ques­tion or cross-​examine his accuser.

And in the pre­lim­i­nary legal skir­mish­ing that has taken place so far, a fed­eral appeals court thun­der­ously rejected the university’s motion to dis­miss John’s lawsuit.

When it comes to due process, the ‘oppor­tu­nity to be heard’ is the con­sti­tu­tional min­i­mum,” Judge Amul Tha­par wrote in a major­ity deci­sion. “If a stu­dent is accused of mis­con­duct, the uni­ver­sity must hold some sort of hear­ing before impos­ing a sen­tence as seri­ous as expul­sion or sus­pen­sion, and … that hear­ing must include an oppor­tu­nity for cross-​examination.”

This is a very inter­est­ing piece. How­ever, every time I read some­thing related to the “con­sent wars” I can’t help but think, “if more peo­ple would train their sons and daugh­ters in chastity, sobri­ety, and self-​control, we’d see far fewer accu­sa­tions and law­suits.” Not to men­tion fewer unwanted preg­nan­cies and STDs.

Left­ists tell us that absti­nence is impos­si­ble, but their “solu­tions” lead to dead ends, some­times lit­er­ally in the cases of abortion.

I’m hes­i­tant to sug­gest that we revert to the time when young women were socially shamed for unchastity — while men were not — or when shot­gun wed­dings were the rule rather than the excep­tion. (Do those ever hap­pen any­more in the United States?)

I won­der, how­ever, if any of these men and women, in the after­math of the “hook-​up,” the rape accu­sa­tion, the expul­sion, and the law­suit ever think,

Maybe I should lead my life dif­fer­ently from now on, accord­ing to a dif­fer­ent stan­dard. A dif­fer­ent prin­ci­ple. Because this one really blew up in my face.

I hope so. That’s called repen­tance; doing a 180 and walk­ing in the oppo­site direction.

It can be done. I know.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-​GoDaddy host

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Again

by baldilocks

The tide is turning in the “Believe Her” Wars.

John Doe and Jane Roe met at a fraternity party. The two, both referred to with common legal pseudonyms, danced and drank. Then they went upstairs to John’s room, where they had sex. Two days later, Jane filed a sexual misconduct charge against John, contending that she had been too drunk to consent. John disagreed.

After several months of investigation, the University of Michigan found for Jane. John was forced to withdraw from the university, just 13.5 credits shy of graduating.

But then John took a step that is becoming more common among students who believe they have been harmed by tough policies aimed at combating campus sexual assault. He hired a lawyer and took the university to court, maintaining his innocence and charging the school had denied him even the rudiments of due process, specifically the right to question or cross-examine his accuser.

And in the preliminary legal skirmishing that has taken place so far, a federal appeals court thunderously rejected the university’s motion to dismiss John’s lawsuit.

“When it comes to due process, the ‘opportunity to be heard’ is the constitutional minimum,” Judge Amul Thapar wrote in a majority decision. “If a student is accused of misconduct, the university must hold some sort of hearing before imposing a sentence as serious as expulsion or suspension, and … that hearing must include an opportunity for cross-examination.”

This is a very interesting piece. However, every time I read something related to the “consent wars” I can’t help but think, “if more people would train their sons and daughters in chastity, sobriety, and self-control, we’d see far fewer accusations and lawsuits.” Not to mention fewer unwanted pregnancies and STDs.

Leftists tell us that abstinence is impossible, but their “solutions” lead to dead ends, sometimes literally in the cases of abortion.

I’m hesitant to suggest that we revert to the time when young women were socially shamed for unchastity — while men were not — or when shotgun weddings were the rule rather than the exception. (Do those ever happen anymore in the United States?)

I wonder, however, if any of these men and women, in the aftermath of the “hook-up,” the rape accusation, the expulsion, and the lawsuit ever think,

Maybe I should lead my life differently from now on, according to a different standard. A different principle. Because this one really blew up in my face.

I hope so. That’s called repentance; doing a 180 and walking in the opposite direction.

It can be done. I know.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar for his new not-GoDaddy host

Or hit Juliette’s!