Stacy McCain and Why we fight the culture war

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Stacy McCain and Why we fight the culture war

Yes­ter­day I was com­ing into the house after bring­ing my youngest to work. He was sched­uled for 5 pm to close but was called in early. He had been offered five extra hours but decided on tak­ing only three. I was a tad dis­ap­pointed that he didn’t take the full three hours until I got home and was engulfed by the very strong smell of pot which per­me­ated the air as a neighbor’s kids and their friends were spend­ing the after­noon get­ting them­selves high. In that moment I was reminded how lucky I am to have the sons I do. When I read this piece by Stacy McCain I was reminded again:

Even if we have been able to avoid the worst impacts of cul­tural deca­dence in our own lives, most of us have friends and rel­a­tives who’ve been directly affected by the unrav­el­ing of our social social fab­ric. Divorce, sui­cide, drug addic­tion, crim­i­nal vio­lence — the kind of stuff Tucker Carl­son was talk­ing about Wednes­day night — are both cause and effect of the down­ward spi­ral that has been destroy­ing Amer­i­can cul­ture for the past 50 years. My work involves con­stantly star­ing into the abyss, look­ing for the lat­est bizarre deviance to emerge in the years since our deca­dent elite opened the Pandora’s Box of athe­is­tic per­ver­sion. And I don’t know how to explain why this swirling cat­a­strophic col­lapse has left my own fam­ily unscathed, except to say that God answers prayer.

Being blessed with a good wife, and watch­ing our chil­dren grow into car­ing, respon­si­ble adults, is not some­thing I could ever deserve, and too often I take this evi­dence of God’s grace for granted.

I’ve met Stacy’s kids, and “good” is too weak an adjec­tive to describe his wife but there is more to it. When I see my sons carry them­selves as hon­or­able Catholic gen­tle­men I remem­ber my very devout mother who retired as they were born and were a strong pos­i­tive influ­ence in their lives until her death back in 2012. I give her a lot of credit in that depart­ment and yes­ter­day when talk­ing to one of my broth­ers who hap­pened to stop by we talked about the real­iza­tion of just how excep­tional our par­ents were.

Hav­ing been born in 1921 and 1924 and hav­ing lived through the great depres­sion and the sec­ond world war, one at home and the other in the Pacific my mother and father were very con­scious of the bless­ings God had showed upon them and hope that I and my wife have passed that con­scious­ness on to our sons.

But both I and Stacy had an advan­tage that our chil­dren do not have. We were brought up by peo­ple who lived in the Amer­i­can Chris­t­ian cul­ture of World War 2 and our own lives have strad­dled that era so that cul­ture and the ben­e­fits of it are an actual mem­ory for us rather than an abstract the­ory to be taught.

It’s a lot eas­ier to retain a cul­ture that you’ve lived in than a cul­ture that you’ve been taught. It’s not easy in this cur­rent cul­ture and I can’t imag­ine how it will be for our chil­dren and grand­chil­dren when we’re gone, but they’ll have it a lot bet­ter than those who have never even been taught at all.

So if you’ve ever won­dered why folks like Stacy McCain and I are so will­ing to fight a cul­ture war that many con­ser­v­a­tives elites have aban­doned now you know.



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Yesterday I was coming into the house after bringing my youngest to work. He was scheduled for 5 pm to close but was called in early. He had been offered five extra hours but decided on taking only three. I was a tad disappointed that he didn’t take the full three hours until I got home and was engulfed by the very strong smell of pot which permeated the air as a neighbor’s kids and their friends were spending the afternoon getting themselves high. In that moment I was reminded how lucky I am to have the sons I do. When I read this piece by Stacy McCain I was reminded again:

Even if we have been able to avoid the worst impacts of cultural decadence in our own lives, most of us have friends and relatives who’ve been directly affected by the unraveling of our social social fabric. Divorce, suicide, drug addiction, criminal violence — the kind of stuff Tucker Carlson was talking about Wednesday night — are both cause and effect of the downward spiral that has been destroying American culture for the past 50 years. My work involves constantly staring into the abyss, looking for the latest bizarre deviance to emerge in the years since our decadent elite opened the Pandora’s Box of atheistic perversion. And I don’t know how to explain why this swirling catastrophic collapse has left my own family unscathed, except to say that God answers prayer.

Being blessed with a good wife, and watching our children grow into caring, responsible adults, is not something I could ever deserve, and too often I take this evidence of God’s grace for granted.

I’ve met Stacy’s kids, and “good” is too weak an adjective to describe his wife but there is more to it. When I see my sons carry themselves as honorable Catholic gentlemen I remember my very devout mother who retired as they were born and were a strong positive influence in their lives until her death back in 2012. I give her a lot of credit in that department and yesterday when talking to one of my brothers who happened to stop by we talked about the realization of just how exceptional our parents were.

Having been born in 1921 and 1924 and having lived through the great depression and the second world war, one at home and the other in the Pacific my mother and father were very conscious of the blessings God had showed upon them and hope that I and my wife have passed that consciousness on to our sons.

But both I and Stacy had an advantage that our children do not have. We were brought up by people who lived in the American Christian culture of World War 2 and our own lives have straddled that era so that culture and the benefits of it are an actual memory for us rather than an abstract theory to be taught.

It’s a lot easier to retain a culture that you’ve lived in than a culture that you’ve been taught. It’s not easy in this current culture and I can’t imagine how it will be for our children and grandchildren when we’re gone, but they’ll have it a lot better than those who have never even been taught at all.

So if you’ve ever wondered why folks like Stacy McCain and I are so willing to fight a culture war that many conservatives elites have abandoned now you know.


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Choose a Subscription level
Of course one time Tip jar hits and always welcome too.
Either way it’s most appreciated.