Common Core is Progressive Indoctrination

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Common Core is Progressive Indoctrination

Those who just just exam­ine the well pub­li­cized offi­cial guide­lines are likely to miss the pro­gres­sive indoc­tri­na­tion that is, some­times sub­tly, buried in the Com­mon Core cur­ricu­lum. This Town­hall arti­cle pro­vides a per­fect example.

Leg­is­la­tors and cit­i­zens and self-​professed school reform­ers should read a lit­tle more into the doc­u­ment. An inch and a half below the list­ing of the Pre­am­ble and First Amend­ment for the mid­dle school, we find rec­om­mended “Monk, Linda R. Words We Live By: Your Anno­tated Guide to the Con­sti­tu­tion.” That leads us to page 95 of Appen­dix B of the Com­mon Core Eng­lish Stan­dards (avail­able online), where we find this selec­tion from Monk:

But who are “We the Peo­ple”?
This ques­tion trou­bled the nation for cen­turies. As Lucy Stone, one
of America’s first advo­cates for women’s rights, asked in 1853,
“‘We the Peo­ple’? Which ‘We the Peo­ple’? The women were not
included.” Nei­ther were white males who did not own prop­erty,
Amer­i­can Indi­ans, or African Amer­i­cans — slave or free. Jus­tice
Thur­good Mar­shall, the first African Amer­i­can on the Supreme Court,
described the limitation:

For a sense of the evolv­ing
nature of the Con­sti­tu­tion, we need to look no fur­ther than the first
three words of the document’s pre­am­ble: ‘We the Peo­ple.’ When
the Found­ing Fathers used this phrase in 1787, they did not have in
mind the major­ity of Amer­i­can cit­i­zens … The men who gath­ered in
Philadel­phia in 1787 could not … have imag­ined, nor would they
have accepted, that the doc­u­ment they were draft­ing would one day be
con­strued by a Supreme court to which had been appointed a woman and
the descen­dant of an African slave.

Here is another exam­ple from that same text.

These two small prob­lems , (refer­ring to aspects of the appor­tion­ment clause) seem­ingly inno­cent words “among” and “Per­sons” quickly spi­ral out into the most vicious words of the appor­tion­ment clause: “adding three fifths of all other per­sons.” Other per­sons here meant other than free per­sons — that is, slaves. Thus, the more slaves a given state’s mas­ter class bred or bought, the more seats the state could claim in Con­gress, for every decade in perpetuity.

The Philadel­phia drafts­men
cam­ou­flaged this ugly point as best they could, euphemisti­cally
avoid­ing the S-​word and simul­ta­ne­ously intro­duc­ing the
T-​word — taxes — into the equation …

This is learn­ing about the Con­sti­tu­tion, Com­mon Care style.

Pro­gres­sive indoc­tri­na­tion is not just
lim­ited to the cur­ricu­lum, the train­ing a great many edu­ca­tors who
imple­ment Com­mon Core receive is also deeply biased, as doc­u­mented in
this National Review arti­cle titled Edu­ca­tion
as Reeducation

UnboundEd CEO Kate Ger­son opened the insti­tute, telling the assem­bled: “If you are under the impres­sion that there are good white peo­ple and bad white peo­ple, you’re wrong.” Ger­son informed her charges that racial biases are per­va­sive, uni­ver­sal, and some­thing “you can­not be cured from.”

For this rea­son, UnboundEd’s train­ing in read­ing and math instruc­tion is “grounded in con­ver­sa­tions about the roles that race, bias and prej­u­dice play in our schools and class­rooms.” Its Stan­dards Insti­tute pre­pares edu­ca­tors to be “Equity Change-​Agents.” To become one, par­tic­i­pants are told, they must first acknowl­edge that “we are part of a sys­tem­at­i­cally racist sys­tem of edu­ca­tion” and rec­og­nize that “we have par­tic­i­pated in this par­a­digm through instruc­tion and ped­a­gogy.” As its “Bias Toolkit” explains, UnboundEd sees its mis­sion as “dis­rupt­ing pat­terns of implicit bias, priv­i­lege, and racism in our­selves, our orga­ni­za­tion, and in the edu­ca­tion field.”

The con­fer­ence doc­u­mented in the National Review arti­cle was for edu­ca­tors from all States. Here is a descrip­tion of the orga­ni­za­tion that hosted the pre­sen­ta­tion. Edu­cat­ing edu­ca­tors to imple­ment Com­mon Core is what they do.

UnboundEd is not the brain­child of some edu­ca­tion school. Rather, it boasts an impres­sive list of reform-​minded “part­ners,” includ­ing the likes of Achieve­ment Net­work, The New Teacher Project, Lead­ing Edu­ca­tors, New Lead­ers, and Stu­dent Achieve­ment Part­ners — not count­ing the charter-​school net­works that ship teach­ers to its insti­tutes. As of 2017, UnboundEd had pock­eted more than $20 mil­lion in phil­an­thropy — includ­ing mil­lions from New Profit, the Carnegie Cor­po­ra­tion, and the Hewlett Foun­da­tion, and more than $11 mil­lion from the Gates Foundation…UnboundEd was born of EngageNY — an entity, sup­ported by mil­lions of dol­lars in Obama-​era Race to the Top funds, cre­ated to pro­vide Com­mon Core cur­ric­ula for New York’s class­rooms. In 2015, Ger­son and sev­eral col­leagues left EngageNY to start UnboundEd, seek­ing to train edu­ca­tors how to teach Com­mon Core read­ing and math.

This Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor arti­cle doc­u­ments how a sim­ple grade school gram­mar exer­cise was made into pro­gres­sive indoc­tri­na­tion. Keep in mind this exer­cise was writ­ten when Pres­i­dent Obama was in office and pro­gres­sives believed those on the right were being mean to him.

Here are the six sen­tences, the “wordy” sen­tence first and the gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect ver­sion sec­ond, exactly as sequen­tially pre­sented by Com­mon Core.

1. The job of a pres­i­dent is not easy.
A
president’s job is not easy.

2. The peo­ple of a nation do not always
agree.
A nation’s peo­ple do not always agree.

3. The choices of the pres­i­dent affect
every­one.
The president’s choices affect everyone.

4. He makes sure the laws of the coun­try
are fair.
He makes sure the country’s laws are fair.

5. The com­mands of gov­ern­ment offi­cials
must be obeyed by all.
Gov­ern­ment offi­cials’ com­mands must
be obeyed by all.

6. The wants of an indi­vid­ual are less
impor­tant than the well-​being of the nation.
An individual’s
wants are less impor­tant than the nation’s well-​being.

It is not until the fourth sen­tence that the lib­eral bias kicks in. Mak­ing sure laws are fair is not part of the president’s job descrip­tion, faith­fully car­ry­ing them out is. Num­ber 5 is dead wrong and about as unamer­i­can as it can be. Num­ber 6 is the polar oppo­site of one of this nations most impor­tant found­ing principles.

This Daily Caller arti­cle doc­u­ments an exam­ple of pro­gres­sive indoc­tri­na­tion buried in a Com­mon Core aligned math­e­mat­ics les­son by a com­pany called Illuminations.

Any math stu­dent who surfs over to the Info​please​.com biog­ra­phy of Ronald Rea­gan is in for a treat. The page duly explains that Reagan’s “‘sup­ply side’ eco­nomic pro­gram” of “tax cuts and sharp reduc­tions in gov­ern­ment spend­ing” led to “the worst reces­sion in 40 years” and a “con­stantly grow­ing bud­get deficit.” The roar­ing econ­omy and the huge plunge in both infla­tion and unem­ploy­ment that ensued rate nary a mention.

All of the exam­ples of pro­gres­sive indoc­tri­na­tion I included in this arti­cle make up a small per­cent­age of exam­ples I dis­cov­ered. I will do a sec­ond arti­cle on this sub­ject in which I will also include shock­ing indoc­tri­na­tion included in AP His­tory lessons.

Those who just just examine the well publicized official guidelines are likely to miss the progressive indoctrination that is, sometimes subtly, buried in the Common Core curriculum. This Townhall article provides a perfect example.

Legislators and citizens and self-professed school reformers should read a little more into the document. An inch and a half below the listing of the Preamble and First Amendment for the middle school, we find recommended “Monk, Linda R. Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution.” That leads us to page 95 of Appendix B of the Common Core English Standards (available online), where we find this selection from Monk:

But who are “We the People”? This question troubled the nation for centuries. As Lucy Stone, one of America’s first advocates for women’s rights, asked in 1853, “‘We the People’? Which ‘We the People’? The women were not included.” Neither were white males who did not own property, American Indians, or African Americans—slave or free. Justice Thurgood Marshall, the first African American on the Supreme Court, described the limitation:

For a sense of the evolving nature of the Constitution, we need to look no further than the first three words of the document’s preamble: ‘We the People.’ When the Founding Fathers used this phrase in 1787, they did not have in mind the majority of American citizens . . . The men who gathered in Philadelphia in 1787 could not . . . have imagined, nor would they have accepted, that the document they were drafting would one day be construed by a Supreme court to which had been appointed a woman and the descendant of an African slave.

Here is another example from that same text.

These two small problems , (referring to aspects of the apportionment clause) seemingly innocent words “among” and “Persons” quickly spiral out into the most vicious words of the apportionment clause: “adding three fifths of all other persons.” Other persons here meant other than free persons—that is, slaves. Thus, the more slaves a given state’s master class bred or bought, the more seats the state could claim in Congress, for every decade in perpetuity.

The Philadelphia draftsmen camouflaged this ugly point as best they could, euphemistically avoiding the S-word and simultaneously introducing the T-word—taxes—into the equation . . .

This is learning about the Constitution, Common Care style.

Progressive indoctrination is not just limited to the curriculum, the training a great many educators who implement Common Core receive is also deeply biased, as documented in this National Review article titled Education as Reeducation

UnboundEd CEO Kate Gerson opened the institute, telling the assembled: “If you are under the impression that there are good white people and bad white people, you’re wrong.” Gerson informed her charges that racial biases are pervasive, universal, and something “you cannot be cured from.”

For this reason, UnboundEd’s training in reading and math instruction is “grounded in conversations about the roles that race, bias and prejudice play in our schools and classrooms.” Its Standards Institute prepares educators to be “Equity Change-Agents.” To become one, participants are told, they must first acknowledge that “we are part of a systematically racist system of education” and recognize that “we have participated in this paradigm through instruction and pedagogy.” As its “Bias Toolkit” explains, UnboundEd sees its mission as “disrupting patterns of implicit bias, privilege, and racism in ourselves, our organization, and in the education field.”

The conference documented in the National Review article was for educators from all States. Here is a description of the organization that hosted the presentation. Educating educators to implement Common Core is what they do.

UnboundEd is not the brainchild of some education school. Rather, it boasts an impressive list of reform-minded “partners,” including the likes of Achieve­ment Network, The New Teacher Project, Leading Educators, New Leaders, and Student Achievement Partners — not counting the charter-school networks that ship teachers to its institutes. As of 2017, UnboundEd had pocketed more than $20 million in philanthropy — including millions from New Profit, the Carnegie Corporation, and the Hewlett Foundation, and more than $11 million from the Gates Foundation…UnboundEd was born of EngageNY — an entity, supported by millions of dollars in Obama-era Race to the Top funds, created to provide Common Core curricula for New York’s classrooms. In 2015, Gerson and several colleagues left EngageNY to start UnboundEd, seeking to train educators how to teach Common Core reading and math.

This American Spectator article documents how a simple grade school grammar exercise was made into progressive indoctrination. Keep in mind this exercise was written when President Obama was in office and progressives believed those on the right were being mean to him.

Here are the six sentences, the “wordy” sentence first and the grammatically correct version second, exactly as sequentially presented by Common Core.

1. The job of a president is not easy.
A president’s job is not easy.

2. The people of a nation do not always agree.
A nation’s people do not always agree.

3. The choices of the president affect everyone.
The president’s choices affect everyone.

4. He makes sure the laws of the country are fair.
He makes sure the country’s laws are fair.

5. The commands of government officials must be obeyed by all.
Government officials’ commands must be obeyed by all.

6. The wants of an individual are less important than the well-being of the nation.
An individual’s wants are less important than the nation’s well-being.

It is not until the fourth sentence that the liberal bias kicks in. Making sure laws are fair is not part of the president’s job description, faithfully carrying them out is. Number 5 is dead wrong and about as unamerican as it can be. Number 6 is the polar opposite of one of this nations most important founding principles.

This Daily Caller article documents an example of progressive indoctrination buried in a Common Core aligned mathematics lesson by a company called Illuminations.

Any math student who surfs over to the Infoplease.com biography of Ronald Reagan is in for a treat. The page duly explains that Reagan’s “‘supply side’ economic program” of “tax cuts and sharp reductions in government spending” led to “the worst recession in 40 years” and a “constantly growing budget deficit.” The roaring economy and the huge plunge in both inflation and unemployment that ensued rate nary a mention.

All of the examples of progressive indoctrination I included in this article make up a small percentage of examples I discovered. I will do a second article on this subject in which I will also include shocking indoctrination included in AP History lessons.